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Tag: Sci-Fi (21-30 of 630)

'Walking Dead' sketches to be auctioned off for charity -- EXCLUSIVE

Is it possible that zombies can be a force for good? Apparently so. Last year, Walking Dead writer Robert Kirkman’s comic imprint Skybound and the Hero Initiative charity gave over 100 blank Walking Dead #100 covers to assorted comic-industry notables for them to sketch their own undead-oriented illustrations. Today it was announced that the covers will be on display together at a free, one-night-only, Hero Initiative-benefiting show and auction held at L.A.’s GUSFORD gallery on Friday, May 31.

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The Greatest TV Couple of All Time? EW Staff Pick: Peter and Olivia

As Kurt and Blaine battle it out with the Doctor and Rose in EW’s Greatest TV Couple of All Time championship, we’re unveiling our favorite couples who didn’t advance as far as we would have liked. Here’s the case for Peter and Olivia of Fringe.

The question EW has been asking in polls throughout this tournament is “Whose love is stronger?” In Round 2, voters favored Gossip Girl‘s Chuck and Blair over Peter and Olivia by a 10.6 percent margin. But I have to argue that only the strongest love – like that shared between Olivia and Peter – can weather storms of cosmic proportions this Fringe couple faced for five seasons. READ FULL STORY

'Orphan Black' series premiere react: Attack of the clone(s)

Judging by last night’s premiere, it’s a little confusing why the new Canadian series Orphan Black should be sandwiched between Doctor Who and Nerdist as part of BBC America’s Supernatural Saturdays. Most of the series opener served as a showcase for Tatiana Maslany, who played one character figuring out how to impersonate another. It felt a bit more like an identity swap dramedy than the sci-fi conspiracy thriller we were promised. But that’s forgivable, because we’re just getting started.

We didn’t waste any time getting to the moment that sets off the whole series. Sarah (Maslany) waits for a train that will shuttle her away from her checkered past. But as she waits, she spots a woman who looks exactly like her — and who jumps in front of the train to her death. Sarah impulsively decides to take on the deceased woman’s personality, and most of the fun in this episode comes from watching Sarah winging it as she tries to be Beth, whose life turns out to be even more complicated than Sarah’s. As Beth, Sarah has to figure out how to act like a cop who’s the subject of a messy internal investigation. And she also has to pretend be Dylan Bruce’s girlfriend, which must be so hard.

If you’ve read the logline for Orphan Black — and if you haven’t, spoilers ahead! — you know that Sarah has many more ringers out there, who are actually clones. I suspect once the Sarahs start to multiply, that’s when the show will really start getting fun. But right now, the highlight is definitely Maslany, who so far mostly has to look flustered and falsely confident in assuming her new identity. The low point is Sarah’s gay foster brother Felix (Jordan Gavaris), who shoots off some mood-lightening quips but embodies a number of ugly stereotypes.

Are you going to keep watching for more clones? Does anyone else think that Alia Shawkat and Tina Majorino are Maslany’s real-life ringers? Speaking of which, how does Orphan Black stack up against Ringer?

Follow @EWStephanLee on Twitter.

Read more:
‘Orphan Black': Watch the first three minutes of BBC America’s newest thriller — EXCLUSIVE VIDEO
David Tennant and Billie Piper to return for ‘Doctor Who’ 50th anniversary
Chris Hardwick previews ‘Nerdist’ on BBC America. Plus, EXCLUSIVE CLIPS

'Star Trek': Leapin' lizards, it's Gorn Day -- FIRST LOOK

Pssst. Hey. Yeah, you. You wanna see some Gorn?

Star Trek: The Video Game arrives April 23 with big ambitions and a complicated heritage, but really, the thing we want know about the most is the Gorn. To recap, the Gorn are a nasty race of reptilian brutes who were famously introduced on the original Star Trek television series in “Arena,” the classic episode that first aired in January 1967. You might remember the epic battle between Capt. James T. Kirk (the T stands for “torn-shirt”) and the syrup-slow captain of a Gorn ship (played by some dude in a rigid rubber suit). Classic stuff whether you love it this much or hate it this much or can in fact no longer tell the difference.

The Gorn get their widest Starfleet spotlight ever with the new game — it creates a fuller portrait of this cold-blooded conqueror race — and that’s why we’ve decided that today is Gorn Day and the first installment of Get to Know Your Gorn series…

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'Doctor Who' meets 'The Dude' in amazing fake trailer for 'The Big Whobowski' -- VIDEO

I love Doctor Who like the British time travel show’s fourth Time Lord loves handing out jelly babies and I love The Big Lebowski like the Dude loves drinking “Caucasians.” And if that previous sentence didn’t read like incomprehensible gibberish then I wager you will love this fake trailer for The Big Whobowski, a mash-up of Doctor Who and the Big Lebowski in which “El Duderino” makes way for “the 4th Doctor,” the Brigadier stands in for Walter Sobchak, and the roles of the “nihilists” are portrayed, appropriately, by Cybermen.

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'Star Trek' is born again (and Gorn again) with new video game

It’s the kind of paradox that Mr. Spock finds fascinating — and the type of unmet challenge that Capt. James T. Kirk can’t resist: No franchise has a longer history with video game fans than Star Trek, but to today’s Xbox 360 and Playstation 3 audiences it’s a brand that might as well be lost in space.

That may change with the April 23 release of Star Trek: The Video Game (available for Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 as well as a Microsoft Windows PC version), which seeks a new commercial frontier for a brand that is heavy on heritage but light on contemporary credibility. The project also represents a traditional Hollywood power boldly going where it has never gone before: Star Trek: The Video Game represents the first major console game ever financed and released by Paramount Pictures, a historic studio that had licensed properties out in the burgeoning marketplace.

“For us it represents a huge investment in Star Trek,” says Brian Miller, Paramount’s senior vice president of brand marketing and the executive producer of the game. “We’re all gamers and we wanted to make sure the game was a triple-A game, something Star Trek deserves and frankly may not have gotten for the last several decades.”

During a limited test session on the Paramount lot, the game (which was developed by Digital Extremes of Unreal and Bioshock fame) was dynamic and engaging and as aesthetically satisfying as the 2009 film that provides its foundation. That film, directed by J.J. Abrams, presented (for the first time on screen) a new ensemble in the classic roles introduced by the 1966-69 television series. That new crew — led by Chris Pine (Kirk), Zachary Quinto (Spock), Zoe Saldana (Lt. Nyota Uhura), Karl Urban (Dr. Leonard “Bones” McCoy), John Cho (Lt. Hikaru Sulu), Anton Yelchin (Ensign Pavel Chekov), and Simon Pegg (Chief Engineer Montgomery “Scotty” Scott) – all lend their voices to the game.

This crew ensemble is the first Trek crew to grow up in the full-swing video game era and they were engaged in a big way by the possibilities of the project. Some, such as the irrepressible Pegg, were eager to come to recording sessions with improv and extra energy. It had been watching Abrams and the cast at work on the 2009 film, in fact, that inspired Paramount to set a new course into the video game universe.

NEXT: A game as Trek canon?

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'Star Trek's original Green Girl the subject of Kickstarter documentary

At first mention, today’s pop-culture connoisseurs might not recognize the name Susan Oliver, the Peyton Place actress who was a guest-star staple on popular primetime television in the 1960s and ’70s. But if you’re an old-school Star Trek fan, you most definitely remember her work from the show’s first — ultimately rejected — pilot episode, in which she played the original Green Girl, the seductive emerald-skinned Orion who was the rhythmic, writhing incarnation of Capt. Pike’s deepest fantasy. (See video below.) She made quite an impression on Pike and millions of adolescent boys who watched the series, which later incorporated her performance into the show’s end credits after it was recycled into a subsequent episode. In fact, when J.J. Abrams rebooted the franchise in 2009, Chris Pine’s Kirk had a one-nighter with a similarly sexy Orion, a nostalgic nod to Oliver’s original character.

But there was much more to Oliver than her brief fling with Star Trek, and an independent filmmaker is raising money on Kickstarter to complete a documentary about her life — titled, of course, The Green Girl. READ FULL STORY

'Walking Dead' website to launch this Sunday

the-walking-dead-logo

For a bunch of slow-moving, reanimated corpses The Walking Dead sure are an industrious bunch. Between the original comic, the TV show, the video games, the novel prequels, and the assorted merch — including the just-announced jawless walker bank — it’s getting difficult to keep track of all the developments in Walking Dead overlord Robert Kirkman‘s zombie-verse. But help is at hand!  It was announced today that Kirkman and his Image Comics imprint Skybound are launching a new website, TheWalkingDead.com.

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'Star Trek' retro poster campaign tackles classic episodes 'Amok Time' and 'Day of the Dove' -- FIRST LOOK

Amok Time” is a classic episode in the Star Trek canon, surely best known for inspiring… the name of the legendary pop group T’Pau. (It’s also the one where Spock goes back to Vulcan for an ill-fated mating ritual, and winds up fake-killing Kirk.) The season 2 premiere from 1967 has now inspired a pretty cool new piece of artwork by talented Trek fan Juan Ortiz. It’s the latest work in Ortiz’s series of retro movie-style posters commissioned by CBS Studios and Quantum Mechanix. READ FULL STORY

Nominated for Nothing: Why the Academy should go back in time to honor 'Looper'

Just about every year, brilliant movies are utterly ignored by the Oscars. The Searchers, Groundhog Day, Breathless, King Kong, Casino Royale, Touch of Evil, Caddyshack, Mean Streets, The Big Lebowski — the Academy has a long history of overlooking comedies, action movies, horror flicks, hard-boiled genre pics, artsy foreign films, and documentaries that aren’t about World War II. This year, we’ll be taking a closer look at films that were too small, too weird, or perhaps simply too awesome for the Academy Awards. These are the Non-Nominees.

The Film: Looper, writer-director Rian Johnson’s head-twisty sci-fi tale of Joe, a mob assassin (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) who kills marks sent back from the future — until one day his future self (played by Bruce Willis) zaps back from the past as Joe’s latest mark. Then things get really freaky.  READ FULL STORY

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