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Tag: Oscars (41-50 of 603)

Inside the Best Picture nominees: A deep dive into 'The Wolf of Wall Street'

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Name: The Wolf of Wall Street

Release date: Dec. 25, 2013

DVD release date: March 25, 2014

Run time: 2 hours, 59 minutes

Box office: Opening weekend: $18.4 million; Total domestic box office: $113 million; Worldwide gross to date: $338.5 million

Rotten Tomatoes score: 77 percent READ FULL STORY

Oscar Season: The Musical! What would this year's Best Picture nominees be like on Broadway? -- VIDEO

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Though Frozen was nominated for two Oscars this year, including Best Animated Feature and Best Original Song, the crop of nine Best Picture nominees doesn’t include a musical.

But what would happen if you took the nine very different films and made them into a musical? You would get some hilarious high-kicking results. From The Wolf of Wall Street cursing on beat to an American Hustle bathroom showdown reminiscent of Rent, it’s clear some of these musical ideas work better than others. Like most Oscar-related parodies that have been happening lately, 12 Years a Slave is respectfully not given a full production number. But if you ever wanted to see Dallas Buyers Club‘s Ron Woodroof do a kick-line next to Philomena, you are in luck! Watch below: READ FULL STORY

'August: Osage County' QuickDraw: Things turn dark at stick-figure dinner -- VIDEO

Julia Roberts and Meryl Streep both snagged Oscar nominations for their roles in the dramedy August: Osage County, but if you haven’t seen it yet and want to be up to date, just watch our QuickDraw of the film. Watch the clip below to see a light family dinner transform into some Jerry Springer Show-type drama: READ FULL STORY

Inside the Best Picture Nominees: A deep dive into '12 Years a Slave'

Name: 12 Years a Slave

Release date: Oct. 18, 2003 (limited); Nov. 8, 2013 (wide)

DVD release date: March 4, 2014

Run time: 134 minutes

Box office: Opening weekend, wide release: $6.675 million; domestic total: $49.133 million; international total: $78.9 million (as of Monday, Feb. 24)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 96 percent READ FULL STORY

Inside the Best Picture nominees: A deep dive into 'American Hustle'

Name: American Hustle

Release date: Dec. 13, 2013 (limited), Dec. 20 (wide)

DVD release date: Unknown

Run time: 138 minutes

Box office: Opening weekend: $740,455 (USA); Domestic: $144.13 million; International: $72.28 million (as of Monday, Feb. 24)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 93 percent READ FULL STORY

'Philomena': Alexandre Desplat discusses inspiration for Oscar-nominated score

EW was on the scene Sunday night as the Beverly Hills Hotel played host to an intimate Q&A session with Academy Award-winning composer Alexandre Desplat. The famed French composer touched on some of his more notable bodies of work, and also discussed his inspiration for his work on this year’s Best Original Score nominee Philomena.

One of the most surprising things Desplat revealed about his latest Oscar-nominated score is that it took him merely two days to compose what would end up being the theme for Philomena. Despite the short turnaround, the composer also revealed to moderator and president of the Society of Composers & Lyricists, Ashley Irwin, that he struggled to come up with a score that would do Philomena the film and Philomena the person justice. READ FULL STORY

The greatest Best Actor race? Where does this year's class rank in Oscar history?

This year’s Best Actor race is shaping up to be one of the greatest of all time. And by greatest, I mean both the most competitive and also the most outstanding, in the sense that each nominee is excellent — hypothetical winners in almost any other year. They also reflect the depth of superb male performances in 2013. Consider: Tom Hanks (Captain Phillips), Robert Redford (All Is Lost), Joaquin Phoneix (Her), Oscar Isaac (Inside Llewyn Davis), and Michael B. Jordan (Fruitvale Station) all missed the cut.

EW’s Owen Gleiberman recently analyzed this year’s Best Actor race, calling it the most “fiercely, thrillingly white-hot competitive” race in memory. Matthew McConaughey is the presumed front-runner for his transformative performance as an HIV patient in Dallas Buyers Club. He’s won most of the pre-Oscar prizes, and the media is still enamored with the McConaissance that has him tackling challenging projects after more than a decade of playing shirtless dudes. Chiwetel Ejiofor breaks your heart as Solomon Northup in the epic 12 Years a Slave, an unforgettable movie experience that depends almost entirely on his graceful performance. Leonardo DiCaprio — who’s never won an Oscar despite being Hollywood’s most famous face for 15 years — is making a strong late push for his performance as a crooked financier on The Wolf of Wall Street. Bruce Dern would become the oldest Best Actor winner if he takes home the prize for his stoic role in Nebraska as an aging man who sets out to collect his dubious sweepstakes winnings. And Christian Bale, an Oscar winner who is likely on the short list of greatest working actors in their prime, is the so-called long-shot for his amazing performance as a 1970s scam artist who gets in over his head with crooked pols and the FBI. It truly is a murderer’s row: three glamorous Hollywood leading man in the prime of their careers, one old-timer conjuring up screen magic to remind audiences of his greatness, and one completely mesmerizing performance from an English actor who finally received the leading role that was equal to his obvious talents.

So is this the greatest “class” of Best Actor nominees in history? And if not, where does it rank? Today, on Sirius radio, EW’s Darren Franich, Lanford Beard, and I nominated the best Best Actor races in Oscar history. Darren selected 1968, the year Rod Steiger took home the trophy for In the Heat of the Night, edging Warren Beatty (Bonnie & Clyde), Dustin Hoffman (The Graduate), Paul Newman (Cool Hand Luke), and Spencer Tracy (Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner). Lanford chose 2006, the year Philip Seymour Hoffman won for Capote, with Terrence Howard (Hustle & Flow), Heath Ledger (Brokeback Mountain), Joaquin Phoenix (Walk the Line), and David Strathairn (Good Night, and Good Luck) in the mix.

Click below for one guy’s top 10 all-time Best Actor races, with the main criteria being iconic performances and legendary actors. Feel free to disagree in the comments. READ FULL STORY

Inside the Best Picture Nominees: A deep dive into 'Nebraska'

Name: Nebraska

Release date: Nov. 15, 2013

DVD release date: Feb. 25

Run time: 1 hour, 50 mins

Box office: Opening weekend: $140,401; Total domestic box office: $16.5 million; Worldwide gross to date: $17.7 million

Rotten Tomatoes score: 92 percent READ FULL STORY

Inside the Best Picture nominees: A deep dive into 'Her'

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Name: Her

Run time: 2 hours, 6 minutes

DVD release date: Unknown

Box office: Domestic — $23.5 million, Foreign — $4.1 million

Rotten Tomatoes score: 94 percent

Her movie math: (Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind + Smart House) x (Like Crazy + Lost in Translation)

Tweetable description: A man and his wife break up and he turns to his sultry-voiced OS for love — and finds it.

What Chris Nashawaty said : “Jonze’s satiric, brave-new-world premise is undeniably clever, but it’s also a bit icy emotionally. He clearly has a lot on his mind about how seductive technology is and how much easier life would be if we could insulate ourselves from messy human emotions. But in the end, those ideas end up appealing to your head more than your heart.”

Number of Oscar nods: 5 — Best Picture, Best Original Score, Best Original Song for Karen O’s “The Moon Song,” Best Production Design, Best Original Screenplay

Her‘s Oscar history: Her writer and director Spike Jonze got a Best Director nod for 1999’s Being John Malkovich. Producer Megan Ellison is in the Best Picture running with not only Her, but also American Hustle, and she was part of the team nominated for their work with Zero Dark Thirty, when the film was nominated for Best Picture last year.

What it has won thus far: Jonze’s screenplay has fared well: It’s won 13 different awards, including a Golden Globe last month.

Why it should win: Her is a look at our future — not too subtle, but also not so overwhelmingly out-there that we can’t connect with it. That’s an accomplishment in itself. But more than that, it’s a new kind of love story that veers away from Notebook-like sentimentality in favor of just plain, raw emotion. It’s enjoyable to watch (the colors! the music! the voices!), and it makes you honestly consider humans’ relationship with technology.

Why it shouldn’t win: At its core, Her is a story about heartbreak and love, and that’s relatable to anyone. But it’s also a movie about heartbreak and love, which seems trivial compared to some of the other nominees — say Dallas Buyers Club or 12 Years a Slave  — that revolve around life-or-death drama and use individuals to show how they were affected by real-life, widespread issues like AIDS and slavery. It’s hard to say that what is essentially a romantic comedy deserves to win when those are its competitors.

Vegas Odds: 150/1, according to Las Vegas Sports Betting

Best line: Anything the hilarious foul-mouthed video game alien says. Plus, when Theodore (Joaquin Phoenix) shares his totally understandable fear: “Sometimes I think I have felt everything I’m ever gonna feel, and from here on out, I’m not gonna feel anything new. Just lesser versions of what I’ve already felt.”

Worst line: When Theodore tells his friend Amy (Amy Adams) that he’s dating his OS and when he gets self-conscious about it, she replies: “I think anybody who falls in love is a freak. It’s a crazy thing to do. It’s kind of like a form of socially acceptable insanity.” Sure, it’s a cute line, but it also sounds like something you’d see written over a “romantic” photo on Tumblr. Pass.

Inside the Best Picture nominees: A deep dive into 'Gravity'

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Name: Gravity

Release date: Oct. 4, 2013

DVD release date: Feb. 25

Run time: 1 hour, 31 mins

Box office: Opening weekend: $55.8 million; Total domestic box office: $268.4 million; Worldwide gross to date: $701.0 million

Rotten Tomatoes score: 97 percent

Gravity movie math: (2001: A Space Odyssey + Apollo 13) x (Moon + Alien)

Tweetable description: Two astronauts get lost in space after their shuttle is riddled by high-speed debris. Time is running out. But the view is fantastic.

READ FULL STORY

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