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Tag: Netflix (21-30 of 72)

Netflix experiments with DVD-style extras for 'House of Cards,' 'Orange Is the New Black': 10 things we want to see

The success of Netflix’s original series has brought up many questions TV viewers had never had to ask before: Will these shows be included in the Emmy race? Will we be able to get the season on DVD? And most importantly, what does it really mean to binge-watch something?

At this point, those questions have been answered: “Yes,” “yes, if you really want to,” and “a serious lack of sleep.” Now Slashfilm reports that Netflix has thought up an answer to another unknown: What about all those fun DVD extras we typically get when we fork over $40 for a season of our favorite show? Answer: You just might get them for Netflix originals.

Netflix is reportedly thinking about experimenting with bonus features for their original series — think House of Cards and Orange Is the New Black. The jury’s still out on what, precisely, that might mean — but in the meantime, here’s what we’d want to see:

More Scandal re-enactments: Watching Taystee and Crazy Eyes re-enact the scene between Olivia and Eli Pope in Scandal‘s season 3 opener was like a dream come true for fans of both shows (they like Scandal too!?). Nothing’s better than watching two Tv worlds collide. Can we get some more, please?

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Shonda Rhimes loves herself a 'human bomb' scene

Thursday’s Scandal, in which a woman wearing a bomb vest takes nine people hostage, instantly reminded us of Shonda Rhimes’ mega-memorable bomb scare from Grey’s Anatomy — a two-episode weep fest in the middle of 2006′s season 2. Thanks to the magic of Netflix and my raging insomnia, I stayed up to re-watch “It’s the End of the World” and “As We Know It” — effectively shooting a bazooka into my heart. It was an accident! I feel fine.

I highly recommend revisiting these eps at a more reasonable hour, if only to remind yourself, while sobbing, that ugh, Grey’s Anatomy used to be SO. GOOD. (Video below.) READ FULL STORY

Do you hate 'Breaking Bad' spoilers on Twitter? You should probably thank Netflix

Whether you’re just now starting to binge-watch Breaking Bad as a whole or you’re  just a few hours behind on the latest episode, Netflix is making sure you don’t find out Walt’s fate before you’re ready.

Netflix, which houses Breaking Bad‘s entire library, has launched a Spoiler Foiler to block all tweets that could potentially spoil anything Breaking Bad-related. By going to the website and logging on to your Twitter account from there, the Spoiler Foiler filters out any tweets with the words “breaking” or “bad” in them. So, it could technically filter out a tweet having nothing to do with the show, but that’s probably worth the risk.
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Laura Prepon may be off 'Orange Is the New Black.' What does this mean for the show?

Repeat after me: It’s only a rumor. It’s only a rumor. It’s only a rumor.

That said, diehard fans of Netflix’s addictive Orange Is the New Black had reason to panic yesterday, when word broke that Laura Prepon may appear in only one episode of the dramedy’s next season.

As of now, neither Netflix nor Prepon’s publicist has confirmed Buzzfeed’s report — or responded to EW’s requests for comment. While this might mean the post isn’t accurate, it also might be as good as a statement affirming Prepon’s departure. After all, if the actress were sticking around OITNB, someone would be quick to shut the exit story down. (When Buzzfeed wrote last month that Prepon would not return as a series regular in season 2, Netflix said the site’s report was “not accurate.”)

So as much as I’d like to stick my fingers in my ears and loudly shout Taystee’s freestyle rap, it might be time to start dealing with this — and wondering what it might mean for OITNB as a whole. (Spoilers for season 1 follow, obviously.)
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Kevin Spacey gives an impassioned plea in support of the Netflix model -- VIDEO

According to Kevin Spacey, in the future there will be no differentiation between films and television.

In a speech at the Guardian Edinburgh International Television Festival, the Oscar-winning actor told the audience of television executives that it’s all just content to him and to consumers as well. Words like “film” and “television” are signifiers that are useful only to “agents, and managers, and lawyers who use these terms to conduct business deals,” he said. The people, he added, just want stories, and it’s their responsibility to give it to them.

Spacey thinks the consumer should be able to watch what they want, when they want to, and the success of his original Netflix series House of Cards proves it. He spoke out against the network model of requiring a pilot before ordering a series. Spacey went to Netflix, he says, because he and director David Fincher didn’t want to audition. “We wanted to start to tell a story that would take a long time to tell. We were creating a sophisticated, multi-layered story with complex characters who would reveal themselves over time, and relationships that would need space to play out,” he said.

Below is an edited version of Spacey’s speech. Check it out:

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Your Netflix Instant Queue isn't gone, but it is different: Meet My List

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By now, Netflix users understand that the streaming service is constantly evolving, but adding more movies is one thing. Taking away a person’s Instant Queue is quite another.

But don’t fret. Netflix hasn’t really taken away your Instant Queue as much as they have replaced it with something they think will be a lot more helpful to your user experience. Meet My List, a place for you to collect all of the titles you’ve found and enjoyed on Netflix. My List will appear as a row or gallery on your homepage, with the titles Netflix thinks you’re most likely to want to watch at the beginning of the list. And yes, it will appear across all of your devices.

However, if you don’t like the look of your list, you can go in and manually change the order, etc. But the less you use it, the further down on your screen it drops, so don’t be neglectful. And last but not least, the new My List feature will include special tags for things like TV shows with new seasons available or a movie that is about to expire on Netflix. Nifty, right?

Watch a tutorial on My List below: READ FULL STORY

Psst, Netflix is onto you: Introducing taste profiles

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Revelation #1: Netflix knows you’ve been sharing your username.

Revelation #2: They’re not even mad!

Revelation #3: They also understand how irritated you get when your account keeps recommending Cerebral Seattle-Set Emmy-Winning Comedies with Largely Pun-Based Scripts because your dumb boyfriend won’t stop watching Frasier on your iPad — ahem — and they’ve finally come up with a solution.

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'Orange Is the New Black': Why I stopped watching after three episodes

Since everyone seems to be obsessed with Orange Is the New Black, I gave the new Netflix series a try the other night. Prone to binge-watching, I sat through three episodes before I decided to stop. Probably forever.

Look, I’m glad OITNB exists — it is, afterall, a show about women, written mostly by women, which revolves around something other than the two main characters “will they or won’t they” relationship. But that doesn’t mean I have to enjoy it. Here’s why I’m not watching anymore. (Warning: Spoilers to follow.) READ FULL STORY

'Orange Is the New Black': Let's talk about that crazy ending

[Big, fat SPOILER ALERT for those who somehow haven't torn through all of OITNB yet.]

My first thought, upon finishing the first season of Orange Is the New Black just moments ago: “Holy s%&*#!”

My second thought: “Thank Pennsatucky’s sweet baby Jesus we’re getting a season 2.”

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Let's talk 'Orange Is the New Black': Are you watching?

Orange Is the New Black may have a tough row to hoe come awards season. It’s more of a pure dramedy than almost any other current “television” series, give or take some Girls: Watch any given episode, and you’ll find cringe humor, serious character study, black comedy, heart-wrenching pathos, and, whenever Jason Biggs is onscreen, broad yuppie skewering. (Perhaps not coincidentally, these last bits are by far the least successful aspect of the show — though Biggs himself turned out to be a pretty good actor, American Pie movies be damned.)

But while Orange is tough to classify on paper, its tone is remarkably consistent — wry, confident, cynical without being hard to watch (at least most of the time). That appealing mix, coupled with its unique subject matter (the goings-on at a minimum security women’s prison), is why I’ve barely wanted to stop watching since I fired up the first episode last Friday.
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