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Watch Brian Williams report Allison Williams' 'Peter Pan Live' news

Brian Williams is a bit of a cool dad (or as Hannah Horvath of Girls might put it, a “kewl dad”): He’s up with the rhymes the kids are throwing around these days, and hey, he’s even chill when watching his daughter, Allison Williams, replicate sex on Girls. (Let’s all take a moment to imagine him visiting the set, asking, “You guys need anything? Some snacks? Condoms? Let me know!”)

So when the news broke yesterday that his daughter had been cast in NBC’s Peter Pan Live, it was time for Williams to prove his real cool-dad cred. He didn’t let on that Allison  was his daughter, but (how could you resist?) he did drop a childhood photo of her already in costume.

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Let's cast everyone from 'Girls' in NBC's 'Peter Pan'

That collective “whaaaaa?!” you heard around 9:40 a.m. this morning was the sound of the internet learning that NBC had cast Girls star Allison Williams as the title role in its upcoming production of Peter Pan Live.

On its surface, the decision seems, well, kind of bizarre. Think about it for a minute, though, and you may get where NBC is coming from: Williams is a practiced, experienced singer, and she’s also long harbored dreams of voicing a Disney character someday. (This Pan musical is different from Disney’s animated take, but it’s just as much of a family-friendly classic.) She’s also got the wide-eyed, gamine quality of a young Mary Martin or Cathy Rigby, the two actresses who have most famously played this version of Pan in the past.

That said: For anyone who watches Girls, it’s going to be pretty tough to get over the cognitive dissonance of watching judgmental, aimless Marnie flitting around in tights, belting about how she’s gotta crow. Which is why we should take this opportunity to imagine an even weirder parallel universe in which a) the characters on Girls are real and b) they’ve all been cast in a live TV production of Peter Pan. Here’s who’d be playing who. (Since he joined the production before Williams did, this cast list assumes that Christopher Walken is still on board as Captain Hook—even though I’m sure we’re all yearning to see Brian Williams take over the part now.) READ FULL STORY

'Heroes Reborn': Here's who we want back

Will we get the Heroes we deserve?

NBC has promised that Tim Kring’s new project, Heroes Reborn, will be a 13 episode event series — a standalone story that’s both set in the same world as and distinct from the previous four-season Heroes series. Still, after hearing yesterday’s announcement that HRG (ahem, Mr. Bennet) will return on the show—as well as NBC Entertainment President Jennifer Salke’s tease last February that “we won’t rule out the possibility of some of the show’s original cast members popping back in”—we can’t help but hope that some of our old favorites will put in an appearance.

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'America's Got Talent': Five non-singing acts who definitely 'got it'

After eight seasons, it’s no longer a question whether America’s Got Talent. (American Idol, and The Voice, and The X-Factor also kind of answered that already.) But what makes NBC’s summer staple so special is that singing’s only one among many talents that can be displayed. Though host Nick Cannon arguably gave the night’s best performance by pretending to be a contestant named Larry the Mime who went off on the judges and audience (“Boo yourself!”), there were many great acts actually eligible for the million dollar prize. And sure, a few of them were singers — but you can find people just like them on any other reality competition. Here are 5 of the best premiere auditions from acts that didn’t just hit the right notes: READ FULL STORY

'Chicago P.D.': The highs and lows of season 1

What started as the Chicago Fire spin-off quickly turned into a show all its own. And I can say that confidently as someone who actually watched Chicago P.D. before I went back and started Fire.

The world of Voight, the sometimes-dirty cop, and his Intelligence Unit was one of doing whatever it took to catch a criminal, and even more so, doing whatever it took to get revenge. And after a season finale cliffhanger that made viewers question everything they knew about Voight, it’s time to look back at the season as a whole — what got us hooked and what we could’ve done without. READ FULL STORY

'Revolution' series finale: Let's talk about it!

WARNING: This post contains spoilers for the season 2 finale, “Declaration of Independence.” If you haven’t watched, proceed at your own risk.

To be completely honest, Revolution’s second season was what its first season should have been: dark, gritty, and edgy. I will say this, though — as much as the show had its ups and downs, it really did attempt to reinvent and revitalize itself by taking notice of what didn’t quite work during the first season (spoiler alert: pretty much everything.) Season two was a vast improvement over season one, the kind of growth that, if this was 15-20 years ago, would have been considered normal. And as much as Revolution was unlikely to get renewed, I really think it could have continued to improve if given the chance to have a third season.

But sadly, that’s not the case, which meant that tonight’s season finale was really a series finale. Let’s see what we ended up with. READ FULL STORY

NBC's 'The Music Man Live': Let's cast it!

Dammit, NBC — why’d you have to announce an upcoming live version of The Music Man that likely won’t premiere until 2015? How are we supposed to get excited for Peter Pan Live when we know that this is on the horizon?

No disrespect to the Lost Boys, but Meredith Willson’s 1957 classic is a much better show than the 1954 stage version of Pan. (So long as Mary Martin isn’t involved, anyway.) The songs are catchier, the book is wittier, the production numbers are more fun — and there’s much less chance of high-wire mishaps, which actually might make Pan the more exciting of the two. Also worth noting: Because many of Pan‘s lead roles are children, dream-casting that special is a lot less fun than dream-casting The Music Man.

So even though we’ll have to wait at least a year (and probably longer) for any confirmation on who’s going to play Harold Hill, Marian the Librarian, and the assorted other citizens of River City, Iowa, let’s take this opportunity to ignore Pan and go full-steam ahead on NBC’s next live musical. Here are a few folks that would shine in the Cast — with a capital C, and that rhymes with P, and that stands for POOL.

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A colt named after Tony Danza? Kentucky Derby horses with pop culture ties

UPDATE: Danza finished in the money in third place behind 2014 Kentucky Derby winner California Chrome and second-place finisher Commanding Curve.

ORIGINAL POST: There’s more pop-watching at this year’s Kentucky Derby than just spying celebrities wearing fancy, oversized hats and sipping Mint Juleps.

For instance, Danza (pictured), described as a “tough colt,” is named for Who’s the Boss actor Tony Danza. The horse’s father is named Street Boss, and a round of brainstorming led owners to the names Who’s the Boss, then Tony Micelli, Danza’s character on the show. Neither name was approved; they settled on simply Danza.

“It’s thrilling,” the human Danza told ABC News. “Wish my father was around to see this — he was a horse player and this would have been big.”

Another horse also received its name from a TV star: Uncle Sigh is a riff on Si Robertson, the wily uncle on the reality series Duck Dynasty. The colt’s owner is reportedly a fan of the A&E show. READ FULL STORY

'Parks and Rec': Paul Schneider, a.k.a. Mark Brendanawicz, has no plans to return to Pawnee

Bad news, Mark Fan-danawiczes: Even though this Pawneean lives in Indiana’s greatest town, the chances of him paying another visit to the Parks department are slim to none.

Scratching your head right about now? Here’s a refresher: Way back when Parks and Recreation first premiered, Leslie Knope’s number one crush was hunky city planner Mark, played by indie film actor Paul Schneider. Mark was basically the Hoosier State’s answer to The Office‘s Jim Halpert — wry, boyish, bored to death by his job but forced by sitcom laws to spend all his free time with his co-workers. He never exactly jelled with the rest of the show’s cast, especially after Parks morphed from an Office clone into its own sweetly optimistic thing in season 2 — and, at the end of the series’ first full year, Mark and Schneider both left Parks for good. READ FULL STORY

Tracy Morgan wants David Letterman's job -- VIDEO

Watch your back, Jimmy Fallon: One of your former Saturday Night Live co-stars is gunning for David Letterman’s job.

Tracy Morgan stopped by the Today show Thursday morning, where he told Matt Lauer he’s launching a new campaign: To become CBS’s next late night host. “Jimmy Fallon needs some competition,” he explained. Hold up, everyone. Let’s not dismiss this too quickly — Morgan’s show sounds amazing.

The band: “It would be different every night. It might be Drake one night, it might be Sly and the Family Stone [the next].”

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