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Tag: Musicals (11-20 of 113)

Head into the studio with Zach Braff recording 'Bullets Over Broadway' -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

Who’s sitting on top of the world? Zach Braff, who’s loving life while making his Broadway debut in the quick-tapping musical comedy Bullets Over Broadway.

Braff stars in the adaptation of the 1994 Woody Allen film as David Shayne, a playwright whose first big Broadway endeavor is underscored by gangsters, divas, talentless chorus girls, and a rising number of dead bodies. The score is based entirely on period standards from the early 20th century.

The cast of Bullets (which includes Tony nominee Nick Cordero, Betsy Wolfe, Marin Mazzie, and Masters of Sex’s Helene Yorke) hit the recording studio on April 14 at Manhattan’s MSR Studios to lay down the new album, available on June 10 from Masterworks Broadway.

Below, check out EW’s exclusive look behind the scenes at the recording session and find out from Braff himself why he’s rolling along, just rolling along. READ FULL STORY

Tony Awards: See every musical performance

There’s plenty of Tony Awards coverage to go around—you can peruse through EW’s list of the best and worst moments, or re-live Sunday’s ceremony through our live blog—but, let’s be real. Everyone just wants to see the performances.

Worry no more. Here are all of this year’s musical performances from the 68th Tony Awards.

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'Hair' at the Hollywood Bowl: Kristen Bell, Amber Riley, Hunter Parrish lead cast

The Hollywood Bowl’s yearly A-list musical production has cobbled together another star-packed cast for this year’s mounting of Hair, directed and choreographed by Adam Shankman.

Kristen Bell (Frozen) will lead the cast as Sheila, alongside Hunter Parrish (Weeds) as Claude, Amber Riley (Glee) as Dionne, Jenna Ushkowitz (Glee) as Jeanie, and Beverly D’Angelo (who starred in the 1979 film version of Hair) as Mom. Shankman’s Instagram announcement also includes Broadway vet Benjamin Walker, recording artist Mario, and 2 Broke Girls star Beth Behrs among the cast. READ FULL STORY

Hear Zach Braff and the cast album of Woody Allen's 'Bullets Over Broadway' -- FIRST LISTEN

It’s not every day that a new Broadway musical pulls its score entirely from early-century period standards — but that’s exactly what Woody Allen opted to do for the stage adaptation of his 1994 crime comedy Bullets Over Broadway.

The show is currently enjoying an open run at Broadway’s St. James Theatre, where bullets are flying, gangsters are tapping, untalented actresses are being murdered, and alcoholic leading ladies are making passes at Zach Braff.

Bullets’ original Broadway cast recording will be released digitally on June 3 and in stores on June 10, but you can get in touch with your gun moll side with EW’s exclusive first listen of the album. The 22-song track list boasts recognizable tunes like “Let’s Misbehave,” “Tain’t Nobody’s Biz-ness If I Do,” and the musical’s show-stopping, food-related anthem “The Hot Dog Song.”

Take a listen to the brand new cast album of Bullets Over Broadway below. READ FULL STORY

Firsts & Worsts: Andy Karl on meeting Stallone and the 'Rocky' fan who hates him

Andy-Karl.jpg

Every actor has to start somewhere — and when it comes to theater performers, their roots are often similar, right down to the roles they cut their teeth on or the songs they first used at an audition.

Rocky star Andy Karl has roamed the Broadway musical boards for years, from playing the sexy UPS guy in Legally Blonde to Wicked‘s Fiyero and Jersey Boys‘ Tommy DeVito. It’s only natural, then, that Karl becomes the second star in Entertainment Weekly’s Firsts & Worsts series, which charts the early theater stories of some of your favorite stage actors. (Lady Day‘s Audra McDonald kicked things off last week.) READ FULL STORY

NBC's 'The Music Man Live': Let's cast it!

Dammit, NBC — why’d you have to announce an upcoming live version of The Music Man that likely won’t premiere until 2015? How are we supposed to get excited for Peter Pan Live when we know that this is on the horizon?

No disrespect to the Lost Boys, but Meredith Willson’s 1957 classic is a much better show than the 1954 stage version of Pan. (So long as Mary Martin isn’t involved, anyway.) The songs are catchier, the book is wittier, the production numbers are more fun — and there’s much less chance of high-wire mishaps, which actually might make Pan the more exciting of the two. Also worth noting: Because many of Pan‘s lead roles are children, dream-casting that special is a lot less fun than dream-casting The Music Man.

So even though we’ll have to wait at least a year (and probably longer) for any confirmation on who’s going to play Harold Hill, Marian the Librarian, and the assorted other citizens of River City, Iowa, let’s take this opportunity to ignore Pan and go full-steam ahead on NBC’s next live musical. Here are a few folks that would shine in the Cast — with a capital C, and that rhymes with P, and that stands for POOL.

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Tonys 2014: Let's talk about those snubs and surprises...

With the nominations for the 2014 Tony Awards finally upon us, the race has been blown wide open in one of the most nail-biting stage seasons in recent memory. Although Tuesday’s nominations announcement narrows down the pack to a manageable four or five candidates for Broadway’s highest honors, there’s an overwhelming feeling of absence when it comes to some of the bigger names who didn’t make the cut this year.

Snub: England’s the New Hollywood
All The Way’s Bryan Cranston and Of Mice and Men’s Chris O’Dowd are the marquee names in the race for Best Actor in a Play, but somebody’s got to be left out, and this year the Tony nominators eschewed the rest of the A-list—Zachary Quinto in The Glass Menagerie, Denzel Washington in A Raisin in the Sun, and Daniel Radcliffe in The Cripple of Inishmaan, to name a few—for British actors like Samuel Barnett and Mark Rylance. In fact, the love bestowed on classical productions like Twelfth Night (tied for most-nominated play with Glass Menagerie) demonstrates the powerful momentum of gorgeous Shakespearean revivals in a season dominated by mega Hollywood names.

Surprise: Sally’s Out, Janis is In
Last week’s final meeting of the Tony administration committee decided that the revival of Cabaret—a carbon copy of the Tony-winning 1998 production—was eligible. But did it even matter? The show was passed over for Best Musical Revival and on most other  fronts, except for Linda Emond and Danny Burstein’s much-deserved featured acting noms. Three-time Oscar nominee Michelle Williams got no love for her Sally Bowles. In the Best Actress in a Musical category already stacked with intimidating names like Sutton Foster and Idina Menzel, recognition instead went to newcomer Mary Bridget Davies of the long-since-shuttered A Night With Janis Joplin. READ FULL STORY

Broadway's 'Rocky': Go behind the scenes of the climactic fight scene -- EXCLUSIVE

Much like the pugilist champ at its center, Rocky is proving a power player on Broadway. Its numbers keep going up, and more and more people are becoming ringside fans of the Philly palooka Rocky Balboa (Andy Karl) and his shy, pet-store employee girlfriend-in-waiting Adrian (Margo Seibert) all over again, after the great successes of Sylvester Stallone and company in the Oscar-winning 1976 movie. (Stallone is a book writer on this show, and could very likely be a Tony nominee this coming Tuesday, along with several others involved.)

But the ringside mention earlier is nothing short of completely literal, as director Alex Timbers (Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson) and scenic designer Christopher Barreca devised a regulation-size boxing ring for the 15-minute, climactic bout between Rocky Balboa and Apollo Creed (Terence Archie), in which a sizable portion of the orchestra patrons are (quite ingeniously) repurposed so that the ring may become a four-sided, true-to-life event for the audience. What results is one of the most eye-popping bits of stagecraft ever created, with no shortage of fun details (check out all that blood!).

In the exclusive three-minute feature below, watch as director Timbers and his fearless cast and crew explain how they went about making what seemed impossible in concept to a fully-realized reality for 1,500 attendees per evening. (And they managed to do it with far less event than another recent mega-musical, as well.) READ FULL STORY

Meet the new Mormons: Ben Platt and Nic Rouleau are on a mission in Broadway’s biggest musical

Nic Rouleau couldn’t get a ticket to The Book of Mormon.

Like the stories you’ve no doubt heard about the wildly popular, box office-busting Broadway show, tickets are one of New York’s hottest commodities, and they have been since the record-breaking musical opened just three years ago. So Rouleau turned to the show’s daily lottery system — about 2 dozen tickets offered raffle-style to eager patrons, 98 percent of whom will leave disappointed — and lucked his way into the Eugene O’Neill Theatre that way. READ FULL STORY

Anne Hathaway debuts as a lounge singer on 'Jimmy Fallon' -- VIDEO

Let’s start with the good: Anne Hathaway sounded great when she stopped by the Tonight Show Tuesday to sing old-timey versions of hip hop songs, accompanied by Jimmy Fallon on piano. (Like an earlier installment of this series featuring Ariana Grande, the bit was technically introduced as “Broadway versions” of rap tunes — but that just seems inaccurate.)

The not-so-good: The bit maybe isn’t exactly…funny? It’s too bad for Hathaway, who could use a silly viral video right about now. That said, elsewhere on the show she gave a charming interview, explaining to Fallon how those pictures where she looks like she’s drowning in the ocean were blown entirely out of proportion, thanks to paparazzi.

We’re all guilty here, guys. Watch the Princess of Genovia perform below:

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