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Tag: Movies (81-90 of 5361)

I'm Still Not Over... the Ferris wheel scene from 'Mighty Joe Young'

Of all the Super Bowl commercials to make me cry, I never suspected that watching an M&M get kidnapped would push me over the edge. And yet, when I saw Rade Serbedzija threatening to chop up the yellow M&M, I was simultaneously paralyzed with fear and overcome with sadness. But why?

Surprisingly, this wasn’t about my irrational love of chocolate. It was about Serbedzija. I knew his face, and it only took me seconds to place him. He was the evil poacher from Mighty Joe Young! Just like that, my tears made sense.

Mighty Joe Young tells the story of Jill, who, as a young child, witnesses poachers killing her mother (along with a mother gorilla). She then promises her mom that she will take care of the baby gorilla who was also orphaned in the hunt. Flash-forward 12 years, and Joe — the gorilla — has outgrown his fellow gorillas due to a genetic abnormality. Thanks to his size, he’s not accepted by other gorillas and spends most of his time hanging out with Jill (played by Charlize Theron). At this point, if you’re thinking that this sounds a lot like King Kong, you’re not far off. However, instead of climbing the Empire State Building, Joe climbs a Ferris wheel. But I’ll get to that.
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Sienna Miller is contrite, topless in 'Esquire UK'

Why did Sienna Miller fall off Hollywood’s radar shortly after the 2009 release of G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra? The answer’s simple, according to Miller herself: “I sabotaged things,” she says. “I burnt a lot of bridges.”

There’s more blunt honesty where that came from in Miller’s big Esquire UK interview, the magazine’s latest cover story. (And yes, the article also includes a very tasteful, black-and-white topless photoshoot.)

In between a fair amount of purple prose (“[we] talked to each other, and at each other, and occasionally over each other about feminism and social media and the press and public morality and twerking, obviously…Some of this into my voice recorder, some of it into the wind”), Miller gives a lot of insight into her rocky career, which started to slump when her private life became more interesting than her professional life — and Miller freely admits that she’s got nobody to blame for that but herself. (Although according to interviewer Alex Bilmes, Miller does concede “that she certainly wouldn’t have been treated in this way were she a man.” Maybe there’s a Katherine Heigl comparison to be made here?)

The trouble began when 2004’s Alfie remake was released — and 22-year-old Miller suddenly skyrocketed to fame, due to her roles as both the film’s costar and Jude Law’s girlfriend. “I was really naive,” she recalls to Bilmes. “Not green as grass — I was by no means an innocent — but I had faith in the goodness of everyone. I was very open. And that led me into all sorts of situations that backfired.”

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Throwback Thursday: What was your favorite snow day movie as a kid? -- VIDEO

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In my childhood, snow days meant putting on a shirt, a sweatshirt, some hand-me-down snow overalls, a jacket, a scarf, gloves, a hat, two pairs of socks, and boots before heading outside and enjoying a day of freedom. After snow ball fights and a potential injury or two, my brother and I would head back inside, leaving a puddle at the front door where our boots and overalls now sat on the floor. Then, there was hot chocolate, some food, and one round of clothes in the dryer before we were back out in the cold.

However, at some point in the middle of the day (but definitely by day’s end), there had to be some relaxation time. And in my household, that meant movie time. Like most kids, my brother and I had our favorite movies that we would watch over and over, and on a snow day, it was usually The NeverEnding Story. I always felt that snow was a little magical, so there was no better movie to incorporate into a snow day. Plus, I always wanted a dragon.

The NeverEnding Story follows a young boy named Bastian Bux as he starts to read a book, titled The NeverEnding Story, and eventually finds himself within Fantasia, the fantasy world within the book. There, he finds an Empress, a young warrior, and most importantly, a luckdragon named Falkor. It was a world of adventure, crazy creatures, and endless possibility. I remember there being an underlying message about letting a child’s imagination live and whatnot, but the biggest thing I took away from the film was the fact that I one day wanted to have a pet dragon that loved me and that I could ride around forever.

Watch the 1984 trailer below:
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Will 'Magic: The Gathering' make movie magic? Let's take a look at the history of game films

If you’re already mourning the end of Peter Jackson’s Hobbit saga later this year, not to fear: Twentieth Century Fox acquired the rights to adapt trading-card game Magic: The Gathering into a film, and the studio claims it will be as big as any J.R.R. Tolkien adaptation.

Can they actually do it? Who knows. There aren’t many forerunners in the tabletop-game-to-film genre, but here are some that show just how well — er, maybe “well” isn’t the best word to use — these types of movies have fared in the past. Let’s hope 20th Century Fox can make some movie Magic. (Sorry.)
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I'm Still Not Over... Beckett's monologue in 'Away We Go'

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Away We Go is a heartwarming comedy that follows a young couple (played by John Krasinski and Maya Rudolph) as they travel the nation trying to decide where they should live and raise their first child. After coming out in 2009, the film quickly made its way into both my heart and (perhaps more importantly) my DVD collection. From the adorable relationship between Krasinski and Rudolph to the plethora of hilarious guest stars — Allison Janney! Jeff Daniels! Maggie Gyllenhaal! — there isn’t a thing I would change about this film.

Away We Go is full of memorable scenes as the couple hops from state to state visiting “friends” disguised as incredibly quirky people who do things like sleep in the same bed as their children and despise strollers. However, there is one visit in particular that is engrained in my mind (in a good way). In fact, this is one film where I can pinpoint my favorite 56 seconds, which usually isn’t quite so easy. READ FULL STORY

On the scene at the Golden Globes: See our photos (and Vines!)

From that burst sewage pipe to a press room stuffed with dazed, slightly tipsy celebrity winners — not to mention the after parties — EW was there to capture all the magic of this year’s Golden Globes. Want to see Bradley Cooper giving us a thumbs-up, Tatiana Maslany giving us her best red carpet twirl, pals Taylor Swift and Jennifer Lawrence strutting their stuff together, and much, much more? Scroll on — and check out EW’s Instagram page for even more stills.

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Help us solve the mystery! Who's your favorite Sherlock Holmes? -- POLL

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle first introduced Sherlock Holmes to the world in his 1887 novel A Study in Scarlet. Since then, the London-based detective best known for his logic, use of disguises, and overall ability to solve just about anything has been portrayed on screens both big and small. From Basil Rathbone’s 1930’s version of the character, featuring his signature pipe, to Benedict Cumberbatch’s recent adaptation, every Sherlock has a little something different to offer its audience.

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This Week's Cover: David Fincher shoots 'Gone Girl' EW cover with Ben Affleck

When Entertainment Weekly approached Twentieth Century Fox about getting an exclusive inside look at the making of Gone Girl, an adaptation of Gillian Flynn’s 2012 smash best-selling novel due in theaters Oct. 3, the studio came back with a surprising reply: Director David Fincher was offering to shoot the cover himself. Not being crazy enough to turn down the Oscar-nominated provocateur who directed The Social Network, we said yes. Fincher dreamed up the image, which features Ben Affleck as Nick Dunne curled around his wife, Amy, played by Rosamund Pike. The result is an unsettling portrait of love gone demented. READ FULL STORY

Cheers to 2013! Ring in the new year with pop culture-inspired cocktails

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This New Year’s Eve, celebrate in style with themed cocktails based on some of 2013’s most memorable pop-culture moments. Once we pop the cork on our cultural cocktails below, it’ll be likely “We Can’t Stop.” In fact, if you “Take Back the Night” with these themed libations, you’ll be having less than a 20/20 Experience… you’ll probably be seeing “Blurred Lines” (hey hey hey!).  READ FULL STORY

Shia LaBeouf continues to plagiarize apologies

I have just about had it with this troll. Shia LaBeouf — or as I find it easier and more reasonable to call him for some reason, Shia Beowulf — will not stop fake-apologizing on Twitter IN THE WORDS OF OTHER PEOPLE. Since admitting he plagiarized Daniel Clowes’ comic Justin M. Damiano in a short film, LaBeouf has been lifting his fake-apology language from Eliot Spitzer, Russell Crowe, BP CEO Tony Hayward, Alec Baldwin, Shepard Fairey, Mark Zuckerberg, and perhaps the most trustworthy source of all: Yahoo Answers. And he’s at it again with three new snippets of terrible performance art today.

Who’s Actual Plagiarist Shia LaBeouf copying now? Let’s check it out (and then please never follow up on him ever again)! READ FULL STORY

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