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Tag: Movies (41-50 of 5363)

The first ever 'Road House' fight chart! (Pain don't hurt?)

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I wrote about Road House’s upcoming 25th anniversary in the new issue of Entertainment Weekly for one simple reason — Road House is awesome. Possibly the finest piece of cinematic work put forth in the entire twentieth century. And I’m not just saying that because I share the same name as Patrick Swayze’s shirtless and mulleted bar bouncer.

There are many extraordinary things about this movie — the extraordinary amount of times Swayze gets shirtless for no apparent reason. The extraordinarily confusing pieces of Yoda-like philosophy that Swayze dispenses that sound cool but really don’t make a lick of sense. And, above all, the extraordinary amount of violence on display. And not, like, building exploding type violence — although, yes, two buildings do explode in Road House — but rather old-school fist-on-face violence. Or kick-in-chest violence. Or pretty much any combination of body part violence you can think of. READ FULL STORY

The 20 Best Summer Blockbusters of All Time: 'Jurassic Park'

More than two decades later, and we still can’t look at a cup of water the same.

Just as the rippling water in that now iconic scene signaled the T. rex’s grand entrance, so did Jurassic Park usher in a new era of cinematic innovation. Making a reality of so many childhood dreams, it marries moviemaking wizardry and emotional complexity to electrifying effect. Park also straddles a number of genres (action-adventure, family, thriller, and sci-fi, to name a few) on top of its ready-made merchandising and theme-park ride potential, ultimately offering something for everyone. But the leaps and bounds made by director Steven Spielberg and Oscar-winning special affects artist Stan Winston aren’t solely accountable for the film becoming a global phenomenon.

At its core, Spielberg told EW’s Tim Stack and Keith Staskiewicz, Park is also “a helluva yarn.” Screenwriter David Koepp improved on Michael Crichton’s 1990 novel about the foolhardy hubris of eccentric mogul John Hammond (Richard Attenborough), who built a theme park after recreating dinosaurs from DNA extracted from an amber-preserved mosquito. During the first — and last — tour of Jurassic Park, a bit of corporate espionage by a crusty computer programmer (Seinfeld‘s Wayne Knight) causes the power to go out, which allows the prehistoric predators to run amok and terrorize the park’s inaugural guests: child-averse paleontologist Dr. Alan Grant (Sam Neill) and his paleobotanist girlfriend Dr. Ellie Sattler (Laura Dern), snarky- yet-stylish math wonk Dr. Ian Malcolm (Jeff Goldblum), and Hammond’s grandkids Lex (Ariana Richards) and Tim (Joseph Mazzello).

Without further ado, let’s continue EW’s Summer Blockbuster Month with a start-to-finish thrill ride and an undeniable game-changer. Open the gates to the utterly dino-mite (sorry, couldn’t resist) Jurassic Park!

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'Pretty Woman' was originally titled '3000', and other high-profile movies that changed their names

The decision to change the last Hobbit film’s name got us thinking about big movie name changes that have happened over the years, and whether those changes actually helped or hurt the film. We’ve rounded up 23 of the most memorable changes to decide if the films were named correctly, or if they had it right the first time:

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'Friday the 13th': We rank the movies to prep for the upcoming TV show

Horny camp counselors around the world, beware! Jason Voorhees is coming to television. According to DeadlineFriday the 13th producer Sean S. Cunningham has inked a deal to develop an hour-long show based around everybody’s favorite hockey mask-clad machete wielder.  READ FULL STORY

This guy is going to collect every VHS copy of 'Speed' in the world (also, he's taller)

Have you ever loved a movie so much that you just had to own every single copy of it? More specifically, have you ever had such a targeted and specific love for a movie that you had to own every single copy of it on VHS? Because Ryan Beitz has.

If you don’t recognize the name, allow me to formally introduce you to the guy who has made it his goal to collect every single VHS copy of Speed and then create his own Speed bus. And in case you’re wondering, yes. He’s taller than you. (Get it?)

As of right now, Beitz owns more than 500 copies of the Keanu Reeves-Sandra Bullock hit on VHS, and he’s not stopping there. However, his drive has less to do with a love of the film and more to do with life, quantity, Freud, Miley Cyrus, and life again. READ FULL STORY

Theme park ride-based movies: Will 'It's a Small World After All' follow the trend?

Bad news: Walt Disney World ride “It’s a Small World” is reportedly getting its own movie. Good news: Uh…

“Small World” has a nice enough premise — ride a brightly colored boat through the world’s countries, learning about their cultures through cutesy animatronic puppets and song. But as for movie potential? We’re not so sure about that. READ FULL STORY

A Peeps movie might be in the works, and we've got a few ideas

Peeps: You either love them or you hate them. Unless, of course, you’ve never had them, which should probably be a crime.

But in case you don’t know, the Easter-themed candy consists of a marshmallow that’s covered in colored sugar crystals and most often formed into the shape of either a chick or a bunny. We know, based solely on that description, it seems obvious that this classic candy should star in a Hollywood movie, but up to now, it’s never been done. However, that might change!

According to Deadline, Adam Rifkin has optioned film and TV rights to the fancy marshmallow treats for what could be a “Lego Movie-esque family epic set the night before a Peeps diorama contest, when a wayward Peep gets misplaced and must adventure through the fantasy lands of different-themed dioramas before the contest’s judging begins.” Ah yes, the tale of the lost Peep. It is a classic, I must admit. But what if this movie went another direction? What other things would make for a good Peep movie? We’ve got some ideas: READ FULL STORY

Rebel Wilson posts the first photo from the set of 'Pitch Perfect 2'

I hope you have your pitch pipes ready, because things are about to get aca-mazing.

Rebel Wilson tweeted out the first photo from the set of Pitch Perfect 2, and even though it doesn’t feature Anna Kendrick or any of those Barden Bellas uniforms, it’s full of familiar faces. Specifically, Wilson is joined by Ester Dean, Brittany Snow, Kelley Jakle, Alexis Knapp, Hana Mae Lee, and the film’s director, Elizabeth Banks.

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From Michael Bay to Eminem, here are creators who've (sort of) apologized for their work

When you create something for public consumption, you’re putting yourself in a very fragile position. For example, creating a popular television show means handing your beloved characters over to the world for weekly scrutinizing. Then again, it also means handing them over for weekly adoration. But no matter how beloved a show, movie, album, or book might be, no creator is perfect. And by default, no creator’s work is perfect.

That being said, there are few times in the world of pop culture where a creator has come forth and apologized for a large piece of work. Do rappers often have to apologize for certain lyrics? Yes. Are there controversial moments in television episodes that get addressed immediately? Of course. But looking back at an entire season of television or a film and saying “sorry” to fans is a rarity in this business. And in honor of Aaron Sorkin’s recent apology to fans of The Newsroom, we’ve rounded up some other notable apologies. And you know what? We’re not sorry about it.

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'Tales From Beyond The Pale' trailer invites you to have a screaming good time -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

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In the mood for some scare-ification? Then we heartily, bloodily, and spookily recommend you check out the Tales From Beyond The Pale Season 2 box set, which is released today. A series of horror-themed audio plays, TFBTP is the brainchild of terror auteurs Larry Fessenden (Beneath) and Glenn McQuaid (I Sell the Dead) who, according to press release-legend, conceived the idea during “a fog-drenched car ride with nothing beyond the windshield but a horizon-less void.”

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