PopWatch Entertainment Weekly's PopWatch Blog

Tag: In Memoriam (61-70 of 326)

Fan-made 'Parks and Recreation' movie trailer seeks Li'l Sebastian killer -- VIDEO

“A small Indiana town is flipped upside down when their beloved hero goes missing.”

That’s the logline for a fan-made Parks and Recreation movie trailer, which uses clips from various episodes to turn the death of everyone’s favorite miniature horse, Li’l Sebastian, into a thriller. It’s funnier than the Alex Cross trailer (intentionally!). Watch it below. READ FULL STORY

The voice of Smurfette, Lucille Bliss, has died

Lucille Bliss, who provided the voices for the cartoon characters Smurfette, Crusader Rabbit, and Rags died of natural causes on Nov. 8 in Costa Mesa, Calif., the Los Angeles Times reports. She was 96.

The animation voice actress’ career spanned over 60 years; she was working as recently as last month. In addition to her groundbreaking double role in Crusader Rabbit (as the title character and Rags) and her most recognizable role in The Smurfs (as Smurfette), Bliss also gave voice to the stepsister Anastasia in Disney’s 1950 film Cinderella and the original Elroy in the 1960s TV series The Jetsons. Her smaller projects included The Flintstones and Star Wars spinoffs and video games. READ FULL STORY

Tom Hanks and Jay Leno remember Michael Clarke Duncan -- VIDEO

“For of all sad words of tongue or pen,
The saddest are these: ‘It might have been!’”

Jay Leno quoted this moving couplet from John Greenleaf Whittier’s Maud Muller at Michael Clarke Duncan’s memorial service yesterday, getting choked up as he pondered what the Academy Award-nominated actor might have experienced if he hadn’t passed away on Sept. 3.

Leno wasn’t the only star who turned out to remember Duncan — according to People, Bones and The Finder creator Hart Hanson, The Green Mile author Stephen King, Holly Robinson Peete, David Boreanaz, Emily Deschanel, and Duncan’s Green Mile costar Tom Hanks were also among the mourners.

Even though the occasion was incredibly sad, speakers threw in a few bits of levity here and there.  READ FULL STORY

Celebrities tweet reactions to Neil Armstrong's death

Neil Armstrong, who became the first man to walk on the moon in 1969, died today at age 82. Following Armstrong’s final departure from this world, celebrities have taken to Twitter to honor the late astronaut’s memory and to commemorate his heroism.

Many of the reactions on the micro-blogging site come from entertainers known for their sci-fi work, like Tron actor Bruce Boxleitner and Moon director Duncan Jones, whose fictional journeys beyond Earth’s orbit have undeniably been influenced by the real-life explorer. Stardust author Neil Gaiman tweeted a photo of himself, Armstrong and fellow writer Neal Stephenson, remarking on his blog, “I spent a couple of days in Neil Armstrong’s company. He was as nice, as modest and as wise as anybody could have hoped for. If you ever wondered what my face looks like when I’m going, ‘This is really happening, and I am the luckiest man in the world,’ it looks a lot like it does in this photo.”

Read on for more reactions to Armstrong’s passing: READ FULL STORY

From the EW Archive: 'Phyllis Diller gets the last laugh,' May 2005

Image credit: NBC/Getty Images

Comedian Phyllis Diller died today in her Los Angeles home. EW’s Jessica Shaw profiled “the most celebrated female stand-up in history” in 2005 when the actress was still breaking ground at 87: She had penned a new memoir, Like a Lampshade in a Whorehouse, and landed a role on a fall TV pilot, The Book of Daniel. Diller’s wit was as sharp as ever, despite her failing health.

Phyllis Diller isn’t feeling so hot right now. She’s flung herself back in a black stretch limo, forcing deep breaths in and out of her mouth, weakened from a recent bout with pneumonia. Just two hours ago, things were not looking so dire for the comedy pioneer, who just published her autobiography, Like a Lampshade in a Whorehouse. Diller had joined her friends General Hospital‘s Anne Jeffreys and socialite Louise Danelian at the Colleagues Spring Luncheon, an annual charity fashion show in Beverly Hills, where the median age hovered around a very tight-skinned 80. The well-preserved posse gossiped about the diamond-dripping donors between sips of Perrier and discussed AARP-friendly topics like menopause, the perils of driving, and the difficulties of falling asleep in old age. Clad in a self-designed, Pepto-Bismol-colored, machine-washable, zigzag-hemmed dress, Diller, 87, eagerly flashed a toothy smile (all real!) to photographers who’d tired of snapping Betsy Bloomingdale and Mr. Blackwell.

READ FULL STORY

Tony Scott: Hollywood reacts to the filmmaker's sudden passing

The news of filmmaker Tony Scott’s sudden and unexpected death due to an apparent suicide sent shockwaves through Hollywood as the news broke on Sunday night. Over his 30-plus year career, Scott had amassed a tremendous number of collaborators, from his feature film work as a director (Top GunTrue RomanceCrimson Tide) and producer (The GreyThe A-Team), to his more recent efforts with his older brother Ridley as a TV producer (The Good WifeNumb3rs). Many of Scott’s friends, colleagues, and fans throughout the world of entertainment took to Twitter to express their feelings and thoughts about Scott, and his passing. You can read them below: READ FULL STORY

Whitney Houston in 'Sparkle': How will she rank among these posthumous performers?

Nobody wants to join the list of actors whose last movies were released after they died — but you’ve got to admit that the company is good. And as of today, that unfortunate club has another illustrious member: Whitney Houston, star of the Jordin Sparks vehicle Sparkle. (Not to be confused with Marian Carey’s Glitter, though both are lustrous tales of up-and-coming singers.)

EW’s Owen Gleiberman wasn’t a huge fan of Sparkle; he gave the film a B- in EW this week, calling it “an overheated mediocrity.” He does, however, praise Houston, applauding her “gravelly conviction” in his review. “This could have been the first step not merely in a comeback but in a major re-invention,” he continues. “She had the instincts of a superb character actress.”

So Whitney’s last movie isn’t exactly Oscar material — but could she still enter the pantheon of stars who gave especially memorable posthumous performances? Let’s take a look at some of her competition:

READ FULL STORY

Our favorite Sherman Hemsley TV moments -- VIDEO

Sherman Hemsley died Tuesday at age 74, but his turns on screen as George Jefferson will live on. He made a career out of one iconic character. As EW’s TV critic Ken Tucker wrote Tuesday: “Hemsley took a part that could have been clownish and exaggerated — George Jefferson, the braying entrepeneur striving to, as the show’s theme song said, ‘move on up’ — and made George a vital, three-dimensional character, and an important advance in the depiction of black characters in sitcoms.”

From appearing in commercials in character, to guest turns as Judge Robertson on The Fresh Prince of Bel Air and shaking it up on Soul Train, he played up George (and in particular his dance moves) at every turn. Check out some of our favorite clips of Hemsley from The Jeffersons and beyond on screen below:  READ FULL STORY

What 'When Harry Met Sally...' was really about, according to Nora Ephron

In 1990, the year after When Harry Met Sally… hit theaters, Nora Ephron’s script was released as a paperback book with an 11-page introduction written by Ephron detailing how the film came about. The beauty of the Internet: You can read that intro when you “search inside this book” on Amazon. She details how director Rob Reiner told her he wanted to do a movie about two people who become friends and decide not to have sex because it would ruin the friendship, and, of course, it inevitably does. She describes in great detail the things Reiner and his producing partner Andrew Scheinman shared with her as they spent days discussing men (the way they wanted to go home as soon as sex was over, the excuses they would make up to leave). She explains how she realized Reiner — who was divorced at the time and reveling in his depression as much as Harry ultimately would — was the character she should write about. Because Harry had that “dark side,” Sally had to be light — more like Ephron (who, yes, just liked food the way she liked it).  READ FULL STORY

Rainn Wilson, Morgan Spurlock and others tweet tributes to the late Ray Bradbury

With the news that Fahrenheit 451 author Ray Bradbury passed away Tuesday night at age 91, celebrity admiration has been rolling in on Twitter all day.

Not surprisingly, the Twitterverse is alive with those admiring him and his work–particularly his sci-fi brilliance and commitment to reading. Check out a round-up of Tweets below: READ FULL STORY

Latest Videos

Advertisement

From Our Partners

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP