PopWatch Entertainment Weekly's PopWatch Blog

Tag: I'm Just a Geek (31-40 of 727)

Throwback Thursday: Remember when 'Zenon' told us we would all live on space stations by now?

Remember back in the day when the “21st century” was some dangerous and amazing place? Computers would take over the world! We’d all live in space! Cars would fly! Well, we can’t technically say that won’t happen by the end of the century, but now that we’re more than a decade into things, we can’t help but wish some of those theories had already come true.

Example A) Everything about Disney’s 1999 film Zenon: Girl of the 21st Century. The fact that we aren’t currently wearing sparkly tights, living in a space station, and saying “stellar” at the end of every other sentence is unacceptable. Is this not the 21st century? Because Disney taught us that by this point, being “grounded” should mean being sent to Earth, because gravity is the WORST punishment ever.

Also, pop stars should be named things like Protozoa, and they should sing catchy jams like this:
READ FULL STORY

'Kick-Ass 2': The female superhero arc we need stuck in the sequel we don't want

While watching Kick Ass 2, what captivated me most was Hit-Girl’s arc. No longer a precocious kid sidekick to Nicolas Cage’s ex-cop vigilante Big Daddy, Hit-Girl (Chloë Grace Moretz) also known as Mindy Macready is now a teenager training and fighting crime while avoiding the fearsome torture that is high school.

Her storyline solidifies her as a progressive, well-rounded character — a female superhero who isn’t overtly sexualized but is in control of her own journey to adulthood. It’s a shame that there aren’t more characters in superhero movies like her — or even more characters like her in the otherwise not ass-kickingly awesome Kick-Ass sequel. READ FULL STORY

The 'Stranger' tease: Five theories about J.J. Abrams' newest pop culture mystery

jj-abrams-video.jpg

J.J. Abrams cast a meaty hook into the Web waters on Aug. 19, a teaser for a new entertainment project that we may or may not know anything about. The mystery box angler loves using this kind of bait: “Stranger” is reminiscent of his puzzling promo stuff for Super-8 or the crypto-content that the Lost brain trust used to feed fans during hiatus. (Remember “The Last Supper” ads prior to season 6?) Decoding this kind of stuff isn’t for everyone. And for some, it annoys as much as it amuses. Regardless: We’re biting. Because we are easily amused, and because we ran out of Breaking Bad analysis to read, and because no one  knows how to bait a hook quite like J.J. Abrams. We love how he turns marketing hype into storytelling fun. What’s “Stranger” about? Five theories — none of which involve Star Wars Episode VII (we assume it’s still wayyy too early for that). READ FULL STORY

J.J. Abrams releases mysterious new teaser trailer -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

J.J. Abrams just released to EW a teaser (video below) for a new project from Bad Robot. What project? We asked, but he’s not telling. At least not yet. Is it a new film? A TV series? A digital endeavor? Let the speculation begin! (And let us know what you think.) READ FULL STORY

'Doctor Who': In a parallel universe, could Bill Nighy be the Doctor?

In an interview with The Express, veteran actor Bill Nighy shared that he was contacted to play the TARDIS-traveling Time Lord for the latest series of Doctor Who but turned the offer down. “I will say that I was approached,” said Nighy to The Express. “But I didn’t want to be the Doctor. No disrespect to Doctor Who or anything, I just think that it comes with too much baggage.”

Peter Capaldi, known for his swear-tastic performance as Malcolm Tucker in the political comedy The Thick of It, was just chosen as the Twelfth Doctor. It’s unclear whether Nighy recently turned down the offer, though, so he might not have been in competition with Capaldi, but a different Doctor. Nighy praised the choice of Capaldi for the role, continuing in The Express, “He’s a marvellous actor. He’ll be very good as the Doctor. He’ll bring a lot of wit and dry humour. He’s elegant and he looks great.”

Nighy briefly appeared on Doctor Who, making a cameo as Dr. Black, a bow tie-rocking art historian, who encounters the Doctor (Matt Smith) and companion Amy Pond (Karen Gillan). In the episode, titled “Vincent and the Doctor,” the Doctor and Amy bring new friend Vincent Van Gogh (Tony Curran) to a gallery exhibition of his work at Paris’ Musée d’Orsay. The emotional and erratic Van Gogh is brought to tears when overhearing Nighy’s Black describe Van Gogh as the “finest painter of them.”
READ FULL STORY

'Avengers 2': Let's cast supervillain Ultron!

Tom Hiddleston confirmed Monday that he will not return as the God of Mischief Loki in Avengers: Age of Ultron, and the possible actor behind the sequel’s title antagonist remains shrouded in secrecy. In the comics, the ever-evolving robot Ultron is the creation of Hank Pym, a.k.a. Ant-Man. However, as revealed at Comic-Con, Ant-Man won’t be featured in Avengers 2 because he will premiere in his own eponymous film. Ultron will instead be the brainchild gone wrong of Tony Stark, a.k.a. Iron Man, a.k.a. the super-rich Robert Downey Jr.

Since we’re going through withdrawal after the deluge of superhero-movie intel at Comic-Con, we decided to come up with our dream casting choices for the meaty — or is it metallic-y? — role:
READ FULL STORY

Psst, Netflix is onto you: Introducing taste profiles

Netflix.jpg

Revelation #1: Netflix knows you’ve been sharing your username.

Revelation #2: They’re not even mad!

Revelation #3: They also understand how irritated you get when your account keeps recommending Cerebral Seattle-Set Emmy-Winning Comedies with Largely Pun-Based Scripts because your dumb boyfriend won’t stop watching Frasier on your iPad — ahem — and they’ve finally come up with a solution.

READ FULL STORY

There Should Be a Prequel: 'The Shining'

The-Shining.jpg

Every week, EW will imagine a sequel to a movie that we wish would happen — no matter how unlikely the idea really is.

In the case of Stanley Kubrick’s 1980 adaptation of the The Shining, the event of a movie sequel isn’t as farfetched as we might think. As announced at the beginning of the year, Stephen King has already penned a sequel to the thriller classic. The novel, titled Doctor Sleep, will follow an older Dan Torrance and hits shelves and online retailers this September.

But the written sequel delves into a drifting Danny’s encounter with another teen who shares his precognitive powers. And in traditional King fashion, it’s likely that we can expect some gloriously gory tale of youth and paranormal vision, twisted into an impossible-to-navigate psychological maze.

Hyper-active Shining fans surely have endless questions regarding Danny’s life post-Overlook Hotel hellishness. But the real mystery lies in whatever events took place in the unpublished prologue devoted readers never got to experience. King’s prologue “Before the Play” helped tie up loose ends regarding the haunting events that took place in the hotel before the arrival of the Torrance family and their nightmare of violence, alcoholism, and telepathic torment to follow. Most fans would argue that they don’t want a prequel unless it’s a King prequel. But a recent late-night re-watching of the “REDRUM” thriller got me thinking, what if it was?
READ FULL STORY

I'm still not over... Chief and Boomer's tragic romance on 'Battlestar Galactica'

Here at PopWatch, we’re reminiscing about the pop culture moments that we still can’t get over — no matter how much time has passed.

“How many of us ended up with the people we wanted to be with? Got stuck with the best of limited options. And why? Because the ones we really want, that we’ve really loved, are dead, dying, turned out to be Cylons and they didn’t know it.”

So says Chief Galen Tyrol (Aaron Douglas) as he mourns his wife’s death. But he isn’t talking about losing his wife — he’s talking about “the one that got away.” It may be cold-hearted, but in the apocalyptic universe of Battlestar Galactica, he’s kind of right.

It’s been almost 10 years since the re-imagined Battlestar Galactica premiered on the then titled Sci-Fi Network. It was a time when network names made sense, quality sci-fi drama aired rather than just sharks in tornadoes, and geeks exclaimed “Frak!” with only a few confused glances as repercussions. Battlestar Galactica is largely responsible for my overwhelming love for science fiction, but it is also responsible for my greatest TV-related heartbreak. SPOILERS ahead, but really, it’s been 10 years. The Ronald D. Moore sci-fi drama set, interestingly enough, a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away, includes the usual hallmarks of space operas like hyperspeed starships, killer robots, and epic journeys to mysterious planets. But it also features some of the most complicated, poignant relationships ever to be dramatized on TV. To me, the most heartbreaking — and there are a lot to choose from (Starbuck and Apollo! Billy and Dee! Adama and Roslin!) — is the tragic tale of Chief and Boomer.
READ FULL STORY

Why 'Pacific Rim' is a good movie for geek girls

There isn’t much entertainment out there for ladies of the geek persuasion — or to be more accurate, geek ladies and geek gentlemen attracted to other gentlemen. Well, at least there isn’t much marketed directly to us. But we all know the dirty little secret of being a geek lady in a predominately geek man’s world — there are a lot of hot guys in sci-fi movies. Pacific Rim, which opened yesterday, is no exception. SOME SPOILERS AHEAD!

Pacific Rim is in no way a perfect movie. It’s plagued with corny dialogue, underdeveloped characters, and a predictable, anticlimactic ending. And like most sci-fi movies, it doesn’t pass the Bechdel test. The Bechdel test, named after cartoonist Alison Bechdel, requires a movie to include at least two named female characters who talk to each other about something besides a man. There are two named women in Pacific Rim — Mako Mori (Rinko Kikuchi) and Lt. Sasha Kaidanovsky (Heather Doerksen). However, Doerksen has a small role, says a few lines (most of which are directed toward her husband and copilot), and dies in the middle of the movie. Kikuchi’s Mako is a central character with a dynamic story arc though she’s less active than her male counterparts. Unlike many ladies in sci-fi, she is not objectified or criticized solely on the basis of her gender — a conscious decision made by director Guillermo del Toro. READ FULL STORY

Latest Videos

Advertisement

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP