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Tag: Gay/Lesbian/Kathy Griffin (1-10 of 261)

Before 'Scandal,' Guillermo Diaz was a real drag in 'Stonewall'

Fans of Scandal know Guillermo Díaz as torture-addicted Gladiator Huck, who’s been known to lick his colleague-turned-enemy-turned-lover Quinn (Katie Lowes) and do unspeakable things to her in parking garages. Nearly 20 years ago, though, Díaz was an emerging actor who’d just starred opposite Parker Posey in Party Girl and was looking for a breakout gig. Enter Stonewall.

Díaz booked his first leading role as La Miranda, a larger-than-life drag queen (and I’m not just talking about her hair), in Nigel Finch’s fictionalized account of the days leading up to the birth of the modern LGBT rights movement on June 28, 1969. READ FULL STORY

Robert De Niro opens up about gay father in 'Out': 'I wish we had spoken about it much more'

remembering-robert-deniro-sr.jpg

Just in time for Father’s Day, Robert De Niro is losing his tough exterior for a revealing new HBO documentary about his late father, Robert De Niro Sr. — a struggling artist who was also openly gay.

In an emotional Out magazine interview, De Niro opened up about his father’s legacy and the responsibility he feels to tell the elder De Niro’s story in the most honest way possible. “I felt I had to. I felt obligated. It was my responsibility to make a documentary about him,” the Academy Award winner says. “It was not intended to be on HBO. It was just something I wanted to do.” Originally, De Niro intended simply to make the film for his own kids, using archival footage from the ’70s with the help of Martin Scorsese’s editor Thelma Schoonmaker. READ FULL STORY

Ellen Page responds to anti-gay pastor: 'Being gay isn't a belief'

Ellen Page won’t let anyone make her feel bad about herself.

Over the weekend, some unnamed pastor sent Page, who recently came out of the closet, a letter.

The actress responded publicly on Twitter, writing, “2 da Pastor who wrote me-Being gay isn’t a belief.My soul isnt struggling& I don’t want arms of Heavenly Father around me.A girls arms? Yes.”

Score one for Page. (Isn’t that the kind of comeback we’d expect from the woman who portrayed fast-talking Juno?)

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Maria Bello describes falling for a woman in 'Modern Love' column

In a new “Modern Love” column, actress Maria Bello describes her relationship with a woman named Clare — which she began after a lifetime of dating mostly men and one other woman.

Bello says that she and Clare met two years before they became romantically involved, eventually becoming best friends. After an epiphany brought on by old photo albums and journals — “It didn’t occur to me, until that soul-searching moment in my garden, that we could perhaps choose to love each other romantically” — Bello shared her “confusing feelings” with her closest pal. After that, she writes, she and Clare “began the long, painful, wonderful process of trying to figure out what our relationship was supposed to be.”

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Another X-Man is out of the closet

One of the newest members of the X-Men, Marvel’s mutant supergroup and long-running platform for various flavors of civil-rights allegory, came out of the closet in this week’s Uncanny X-Men #14. Although that makes it sound like a cosmic revelation, in fact Benjamin Deeds —  a.k.a. Morph — rather casually mentions his homosexuality in conversation in the issue.

Gay characters are becoming more commonplace in superhero comic books. Just last year, occasional X-Man Northstar got married. And, as a representative for Marvel told the Huffington Post, the character’s sexual orientation is just “a small facet of who he is.” (Some context: he also has the power to alter his appearance, which will probably come up more frequently in supervillain fights than with who he shares his bed with.) READ FULL STORY

Sara Gilbert: Dating Johnny Galecki made me realize I was gay -- VIDEO

Roseanne debuted 25 long years ago — but even now, tales of its explosive backstage drama are still circulating. And on yesterday’s edition of The Talk, one of the sitcom’s stars revealed that she underwent her own share of personal turmoil on set — while dating her onscreen love interest, no less.

Long before creating The Talk for CBS, actress Sara Gilbert got her start playing Roseanne‘s sarcastic Darlene Connor. In the sitcom’s fourth season, her character started dating David Healy, played by future Big Bang Theory star Johnny Galecki — and soon enough, Gilbert and Galecki were a real-life item as well. “I thought he was super cute and I had a total crush on him,” Gilbert said yesterday on The Talk. (It’s currently the show’s “secrets week.”) “And we started dating and he would come over and we would, like, make out. And then I would start to get depressed.”

Why? Because Gilbert was slowly realizing that she was actually a lesbian — and to Galecki’s credit, she says, he was extremely understanding when she broke the news. “[I] eventually told him I thought it was about my sexuality, and he was super sweet about it,” she said. Though Gilbert eventually began dating a woman, she remained in the closet “for years” — and Galecki continued to keep her secret. “I always felt so scared,” she recalled. “If it came out, what could happen? Could I lose my career? Will I ever be able to play a straight role again?”

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'Below Deck' season finale: Adrienne Gone Wild

I watched every episode of Bravo’s Below Deck this summer and all I have to show for it is a pretty intense crush on Chef Ben Robinson and a cluster of nightmares about that one terrible summer when I was a terrible, terrible waitress. Plus this blog item, I guess. Life could not be more meaningless. Time to jump off board!

This week’s finale promos kept promising high seas drama for chief stew Adrienne Gang (pictured), but all she ended up doing was getting drunk with a bunch of lesbians, not totally embarrassing herself (minus the ’90s dance moves and odd formalwear), and generally having a blast. How dare she! READ FULL STORY

Coming out on Twitter? That's so Raven

Think Raven Baxter saw this one coming?

According to an article written in the National Enquirer last spring, “lesbian rumors have hounded” ex-Disney Channel star Raven-Symone “for years.” Those rumors apparently reached a fever pitch in 2012, when the Enquirer reported that Raven was living in a “love-nest” with openly gay America’s Next Top Model contestant AzMarie Livingston.

Rather than shoot down the speculation, Symone responded by simply tweeting the following: “My sexual orientation is mine, and the person I’m datings to know. I’m not one for a public display of my life.” In other words: “I’m perfectly comfortable in the glass closet.”

Or at least she was until today, when Raven tweeted this message:

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'Ender's Game' and Spider-Man: Pop Culture's Big Gay Panic

Most artists and writers instinctively dislike the idea of cultural boycotts, and for good reason. The scales should always tip toward freedom of expression — even disagreeable expression — and when we fight over pop culture, our arguments should stem from knowledge rather than from a flat refusal to engage with questionable material. Besides, most cultural boycotts are strategically ineffective; it’s hard to tally the number of people who don’t see a movie or watch a TV show, and impossible to determine when staying away constitutes a statement and when it merely indicates lack of interest.

As a manifestation of anger or disgust, boycotts are extreme and, appropriately, rare. So it’s noteworthy that talk of an organized protest against the sci-fi drama Ender’s Game, which opens Nov. 1, has heated up enough to provoke responses from both Orson Scott Card, the author of the novel on which it’s based, and the movie’s distributor. Card is an outspoken opponent of marriage equality whose decades-long history of antigay public commentary is well documented; now that he has a movie to sell, he is saying that in the wake of the recent Supreme Court decision overturning a portion of the Defense of Marriage Act, the issue is “moot.” On July 8, he gave a statement to EW in which he urged gay rights supporters to show “tolerance toward those who disagreed with them when the issue was still in dispute.”

It’s hard to know where to begin to dismantle the smugness and intellectual dishonesty in Card’s words. His assertion that gay rights are now “moot” in a country in which 37 states still consider my marriage unworthy of recognition is weak enough, but I’d rather move on to his self-serving appropriation of “tolerance.” No group of people is required to tolerate those who would oppress them, but beyond that, Card is using calm and temperate language to disguise the extremity of his position. He’s not simply against marriage equality; as recently as 2008, he publicly called for straight married Americans to unite in an effort to “destroy” their “mortal enemy,” by which he meant a revolutionary overthrow of any U.S. government led by “dictator-judges” who support same-sex marriage. He’s an off-the-spectrum hatemonger cloaking himself as a voice of principled opposition, and he richly deserves to be shunned. READ FULL STORY

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