PopWatch Entertainment Weekly's PopWatch Blog

Tag: Entertainment Geekly (21-30 of 76)

Entertainment Geekly: Why are we so obsessed with the 1980s?

entertainment-geekly-tron.jpg

Entertainment Geekly is a weekly column that examines pop culture through a geek lens and simultaneously examines contemporary geek culture through a pop lens. So many lenses!

Measuring time in specific decades is a fallacy, but it’s a fallacy that everyone believes in. There’s no legitimate reason that we should set aside the passage of time between January 1, 1980 and December 31, 1989 as a specific and clearly defined unit of time. 1979 wasn’t too different from 1980; most of the movies released in 1990 were probably shot in 1989. People used to refer to the ’80s as “the MTV Decade” before every decade became some kind of MTV Decade — but it’s worth remembering that MTV’s ridiculously iconic debut video, “Video Killed the Radio Star,” featured a song written in 1978. READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly Podcast: 'Sleepy Hollow' and 'Community'

The Entertainment Geekly podcast continues its tour through television this week, as fellow traveler Jeff Jensen and I explore the just-concluded first season of Sleepy Hollow and the rebooted fifth season of Community. Jeff and I also throw out our three favorite episodes of Community, although those short lists of three quickly spiral into an interlocking double-helix list of several. Suggestions for further reading: Jeff’s review of Community‘s return and my review of Sleepy Hollow‘s season.

Listen to the complete podcast below or check us out in the iTunes store. Tweet arguments and counterarguments to us at @EWDocJensen and @DarrenFranich.
READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly: 'Her,' 'Fight Club,' and days of future present

entertainment-geekly-02.jpg

Entertainment Geekly is a weekly column that examines pop culture through a geek lens and simultaneously examines contemporary geek culture through a pop lens. So many lenses!

I finally saw Her this week and now all I can think about is Fight Club. Surface-level, I’ll admit: Not much in common. Fight Club is badass and bloody and chilly and exhaustively cool. Her is mournful and sweet and confessional and strenuously twee. Fight Club is a dude movie about dudes who can’t stop talking about what dudes they are; Helena Bonham Carter plays the local representative of The Female Gender as a Manic Pixie Dream Madonna-Whore Complex. Her is about one man surrounded by women: An ex-wife, a bad date, a best friend, a woman who is everywhere and nowhere at once.
READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly Podcast: 'True Detective' and 'American Horror Story'

The Entertainment Geekly podcast returns today with a TV-centric episode focusing on the TV shows we’re currently obsessed with. First off, me and co-conspirator Jeff Jensen talk about HBO’s new noir True Detective. From there, we dive deep into the American Horror Story ocean, debating the merits of this season’s Coven versus the crazy-house opera that was Asylum. Suggestions for further reading: Jeff’s full take on True Detective and my recapsĀ of Coven.
READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly: The speech Michael Bay was going to give at CES

Entertainment Geekly is a weekly column that examines pop culture through a geek lens and simultaneously examines contemporary geek culture through a pop lens. So many lenses! Click here for past columns.

Michael Bay made headlines this week, but not the good kind like you want. The director of films like Transformers and Transformers took a break from making his third or fourth Transformers to appear onstage at the Computer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. Samsung wanted him to say a few words about their new curved TV. Bay began his speech with the tantalizing declaration, “I get to dream for a living.” He quickly became flustered by a #TeleprompterFail, departing the stage with a polite but firm apology. (The director later explained the incident on his blog.)

Entertainment Geekly has obtained the complete transcript of Bay’s original speech, which follows: READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly: My Top 100 Disney Things, off the top of my head

entertainment-geekly-scrooge.jpg

Entertainment Geekly is a weekly column that examines contemporary pop culture through a geek lens and simultaneously examines contemporary geek culture through a pop lens. So many lenses! Click here for past columns.

Last week I wrote a long and rant-y column about the Disney Myth, as constructed in Saving Mr. Banks and deconstructed in Escape From Tomorrow. In an effort to prove I’m not the world’s biggest grouch — and because I spent the past week in the metaphorical Disneyland known as “being back home with my family for the holidays” — I decided to try an experiment that would prove just how completely Disney has colonized our minds. But, like, in a fun way.

Without resorting to the internet, I tried to make a list of my Top 100 Disney Things: Official Disney-branded movies, TV shows, interactive experiences, whatever, all ranked in the chronological order that they popped into my mind. It was sort of a pop culture version of a Proust memory experience, with one vividly recalled childhood memory leading into another. I recommend making your own Disney Top 100, especially if you’re A) bored or B) in the mood to get a couple dozen songs stuck in your head.
READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly: The Disney Myth in 'Saving Mr. Banks' and 'Escape from Tomorrow'

Entertainment Geekly is a weekly column that examines contemporary pop culture through a geek lens and simultaneously examines contemporary geek culture through a pop lens. So many lenses! Click here for past columns.

“Disney” used to be a name, but for several generations of human beings spread out across our terrestrial sphere, it is more like a primal state of mind. However old you are, if you’re reading this, “Disney” probably conjures up memories for you, either because everyone was young once or because most people have kids eventually. I was born a couple decades after Walt Disney died, which meant that my parents could feed me an impossible amount of Disney-branded content: Animated features, Saturday morning cartoons, action figures, and videogames based on all of the above.

Family myth has it that the first movie I ever went to see/was taken to in the theaters was The Black Cauldron. That could be a trick of memory. But sometime in grade school, I pulled a page off my Disney Page-A-Day calendar, saw an image from The Black Cauldron, and experienced a deep and resonant feeling of buried memory. Maybe because I had happened upon The Black Cauldron on TV one day, or maybe it was playing in the background of somebody’s fourth birthday party. Maybe I just absorbed The Black Cauldron through osmosis when my parents took me to Disneyland. (I can’t ever remember watching Dumbo, but I bet a hypnotist could uncover some corner of my subconscious and make me draw it from memory.) READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly: The Golden Globes' Comedy Snafu, and how to fix it (Hint: More awards)

Entertainment Geekly is a weekly column that examines contemporary pop culture through a geek lens and simultaneously examines contemporary geek culture through a pop lens. So many lenses! Click here for past columns.

My favorite awards show is the Golden Globes, specifically because the Golden Globes are completely unbeholden by the intrinsic questions of Quality and Tradition and Making Basic Coherent Sense that so bedevils other awarding bodies. Nobody really thinks the Golden Globes mean anything, and so the mere fact of their continued existence — and increasing popularity — actually grade-inflates them into meaning something. They are handed out by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, a group of people who could frankly be Norwegian lizard-men for all we know. But the lizard-men throw a great show. They feed people booze. The sheer inauthenticity of the event seems to loosen up celebrities, in a way that actually encourages authenticity.
READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly: Now let's cast the rest of the Justice League

Entertainment Geekly is a weekly column that examines contemporary pop culture through a geek lens and simultaneously examines contemporary geek culture through a pop lens. So many lenses! Click here for past columns.

Remember when Zack Snyder officially announced his intention to put a Batman movie inside a Superman movie? On Wednesday, he got even more ambitious: Warner Bros. officially announced that Gal Gadot was playing Wonder Woman. We’ve all had a day to work through our complicated feelings about that news. But now it’s time to move on to more important things. Snyder’s incipient Superman saga always carried the implicit promise of bigger things: A whole multimovie mega-franchise focusing on different DC superheroes, all leading up to a franchise-knitting superteam film.

It took Marvel four years, three successful mini-franchises, and one nonstarter Hulk franchise to get to Avengers. Warner Bros. is clearly hoping to accelerate that timeline. Batman Vs. Superman Plus Wonder Woman points directly to a Justice League movie by Q3 2017, if not earlier. It’s equally possible that the studio has a more ambitious architecture in place: They could be plotting to launch their other superheroes in team-up movies from 2015 onward, with Ben Affleck on retainer to play Batman for half an hour in each movie, essentially serving as franchise booster rockets. (DC Comics has been doing this for years. Launching a new comic book? Put Batman on the cover as an issue 1 guest star.)

Whatever: The point is, casting for the rest of the Justice League has moved from an ambient years-forward possibility to an immediate probability. Which means it’s never been more important for us to collectively tell Warner Bros. how to cast the rest of the Justice League. It’s a tricky gambit: They need people who will form a fun ensemble right away, but who can also suggest a possible movie waiting to be built around them. (They require Ruffalo-Hulks; they could settle for Johansson-Widows; they need something better than Renner-Hawkeyes.) Forthwith, the best possible casting choices, with careful consideration given to extra-film details like “How will Twitter react?” and “How will they look on a panel at Comic-Con 2015?”:
READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly: What James Bond and 'Doctor Who' tell us about the future of pop culture

Entertainment Geekly is a weekly column that examines contemporary pop culture through a geek lens and simultaneously examines contemporary geek culture through a pop lens. So many lenses!

James Bond and the Doctor don’t have very much in common. Bond is a violent British superspy. The Doctor is a pacifist alien traveler. Bond jets around to exotic locations and uses expensive gadgets; the Doctor spends a curious amount of time in Wales and uses semi-abstract technology that makes funny noises. Weirdly, if the two characters ever met, they would probably be enemies. Bond is the kind of guns-blazing loose cannon the Doctor hates; in turn, the Doctor is practically a Bond villain, a stateless entity with a sci-fi lair that houses several weapons of mass destruction.

Bond is a hedonist with rampant sex drive, a figure of pure id. The Doctor is a vaguely ascetic intellectual, a figure of pure superego. Except when he’s not, which brings up a more important difference: Whereas the Platonic Ideal of James Bond was chiseled in granite from the word go, the Doctor is less a character than a series of variables. James Bond has always kind of looked the same; the Doctor can look like a scary philosopher hobo or the internet’s dream of combining every member of a British boy band into one perfect human. Both characters are essentially immortal, although in different ways. The Doctor frequently mentions his age, although he could be lying, or just forgetful. James Bond is always a man just old enough to have the athletic prowess of a peak Olympian and the refined taste of a retiree millionaire. READ FULL STORY

Latest Videos

Advertisement

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP