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Tag: Entertainment Geekly (11-20 of 92)

Entertainment Geekly: 'Doctor Who' is the saddest show on television

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Those people down there. They’re never small to me. Don’t make assumptions about how far I will go to protect them, because I’ve already come a very long way. And unlike you, I do not expect to reach the Promised Land.

About two years ago, I found Doctor Who on Netflix. This is a classic better-late-than-never situation. At that point, the Doctor Who notioncalling it a “franchise” feels reductivehad been in a perpetual state of existence for 49 years. Long story short, assuming you don’t know: Time-traveling alien named the Doctor goes on adventures. Real name unknown, possibly forgotten. Long story slightly longer: The time-traveling alien is also a shape-changing immortal, and “death” is just a momentary glowing-light distraction before the alien’s rebirth, with a new body, a new attitude, and a new fashion sense. READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly: 3 stories show why Daredevil is the best superhero

Entertainment Geekly is a weekly column that examines pop culture through a geek lens and simultaneously examines contemporary geek culture through a pop lens. So many lenses! Sometimes we’ll look back at an essential part of the last few decades of geek history. Today: Three very different, equally fantastic takes on Daredevil.

Blind man, blind lawyer, blind superhero. Lives on the baddest best side of the best bad city. Hates bad people; fights them in court and fights them on the street. Wears red. Has a best friend: tubby, lovable, concerned. Has a girlfriend; probably has another. Has a secret identity; it’s never too secret, unfortunately. Drives himself too hard, definitely. Crazy, maybe. Raised in his city, loves his city, watches his city take everything away from him, over and over again. That’s Daredevil. That’s the formula. That’s how you get three of the greatest superhero stories ever told. READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly: When did superhero movies get so unsurprising?

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Lucy is a superhero movie that doesn’t know it’s a superhero movie, so it’s the most interesting superhero movie of the year. Lucy’s “origin story” is a kick to her stomach and a zero-gravity seizure, and in one scene Scarlett Johansson scarfs down a bunch of blue rocks like her life depends on it. (Lucy pays homage to 2001: A Space Odyssey and Michelangelo’s The Creation of Adam—at the same time.) Without mythology to reference or fandom to service, Lucy is free to surprise you.

“Surprise” is something comic-book movies used to do. Think of The Dark Knight, filtering Batman Begins’ epic sweep into a Michael Mann- inflected scuzz-pulp crime thriller. Or The Avengers, transforming a Mega-Icon Mash-up into a delicate, delirious work- place sitcom. Back in April, Captain America: The Winter Soldier sure looked like something new: a spy thriller sequelized from a war movie. Yet I’m hard-pressed to say what actually surprised me. Black Widow and Captain America almost had a thing, didn’t. Nick Fury almost died, didn’t. Deck chairs were almost rearranged, weren’t.

Then came summer’s two big superhero films: X-Men: Days of Future Past and The Amazing Spider-Man 2, both adapted from decades-old comic-book plots. X-Men felt like one of Irwin Allen’s 1970s disaster films: a goofy romp classed up by stars paychecked into an attention-deficit cameo carousel. So what if you knew that nobody would stay dead? The ride was fun.

READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly: Your thoughts on the DC Cinematic Universe

Entertainment Geekly is a weekly column that examines pop culture through a geek lens and simultaneously examines contemporary geek culture through a pop lens. So many lenses!

Last week, I asked a simple question: Is the DC Cinematic Universe–the Warner Bros. back-of-the-napkin plan to launch an all-out assault on Marvel Studios by unleashing a double-digit boatload of superhero movies between now and 2020–actually a thing? Will the Man of Steel-verse actually transform into a cape-ier alternative to the Avengers-verse? Or is this a Valiant-Comics-in-1992 thing–a situation where all the elaborate and ambitious universe-building plans will ultimately dead-end against the cruel capitalist realities of people just not being interested? READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly: Is Warner Bros.' DC cinematic universe really a thing?

Entertainment Geekly is a weekly column that examines pop culture through a geek lens and simultaneously examines contemporary geek culture through a pop lens. So many lenses! Sometimes, there will be an event so mysterious that it can only be properly understood if everyone offers their own profound opinions in the comment boards. This week’s Entertainment Geekly Hot Topic: Is the DC Cinematic Universe actually a thing?

It’s easy to announce a release date. Watch this: Hellboy 3 is going to come out on May 21, 2019. There, I announced it. Do I know that for sure? No: The future is yet unwritten, and even if it has been written, Wolverine might time-travel from the future and change the past to save our present, or something. Also, summer 2019 is five years away. There could be a financial crisis. Aliens might attack. People might get bored of superheroes. Guillermo del Toro might decide to direct Godzilla vs. King Kong, which you have to remember is sort of a thing that might happen. READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly: Or maybe 'Twilight' was the best thing to happen to Comic-Con

Entertainment Geekly is a weekly column that examines pop culture through a geek lens and simultaneously examines contemporary geek culture through a pop lens. So many lenses!

“Were the Twilight movies good?” is not a question I want to even ask right now. It’s too complicated, with too many extremist perspectives on either side. There are the kids who grew up with the Twilight phenomenon as their entire teenage pop culture prism. (Remember: Thanks to the annual-ish release strategy and the real-life romance angle and the fact that Twilight soundtracks were sort of a thing, Twilight as experienced by teenagers was this weird post-millenium mixed cocktail of the Beatles and Elizabeth Taylor/Richard Burton and whatever teen-drama TV show you thought was awesome when you were a dumb teenager.) And there are the slightly older, hipper kids who will maybe never forgive Twilight for making a dumber Buffy the Vampire Slayer into a more popular Buffy the Vampire Slayer. READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly: An appreciation of 'Beneath the Planet of the Apes,' one of the silliest, bleakest movies ever made

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It is entirely possible that Planet of the Apes has the best batting average of any long-running movie franchise. In 46 years, there have been good Apes movies, and fascinatingly bad Apes movies, and at least one legitimate Hall of Fame masterwork (the original film, one of the most brutally cynical adventures in Hollywood history). The first film was based on a novel by French author Pierre Boule about a monkey planet—but the sequels set off in fascinating, frequently goofy, always energetic new directions. READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly: 'Community' survives. Television dies?

Entertainment Geekly is a weekly column that examines pop culture through a geek lens and simultaneously examines contemporary geek culture through a pop lens. So many lenses!

If you’re a human being, you probably don’t watch Community. The show’s audience is engaged, empowered, and one-sixth the size of the audience accidentally watching whatever’s on after The Big Bang Theory. And I know why you don’t watch. Even by the standards of low- rated cause-célèbre wonder shows, Community is hard to like. The lead characters are pricks, lunatics, deluded mock-intellectuals, and self-important gasbags. The most likable character on the show would be the most annoying person you have ever met.

So Community’s brilliance testifies to the full commitment of the actors, the writers, the directors, and mad-genius showrunner Dan Harmon. And the fact that Community lasted five seasons on NBC testifies to to the postapocalyptic state of television in general. READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly: A serious attempt to understand why every movie is about Magic Blood now

Entertainment Geekly is a weekly column that examines pop culture through a geek lens and simultaneously examines contemporary geek culture through a pop lens. So many lenses!

This summer, it’s all about the blood. Young Harry Osborn was hankering for some Spidey-plasma in The Amazing Spider-Man 2, because Peter Parker’s very special blood is a cure-all for the Green Death Disease that apparently afflicts all Osborns. Mystique’s blood was the secret sauce that transformed the Sentinels from giant gawky robots to shapeshifting protean-powered T-1000-bots in X-Men: Days of Future Past. (Confused? It’s all here in this pamphlet.)

In the underrated Edge of Tomorrow, Tom Cruise huffs an alien attacker’s hemoglobin and winds up absorbing the alien’s reboot-button superpowers. And in the exactly-rated Trans4mers, evil nerd scientists corpse-mine some dead space robots and come up with a new element that allows anyone to create anything they want. This element is called “Transformium”–which could mean that, in the world of Transformers, human blood is referred to as “Humanium.” READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly: Why 'Hannibal' is the better version of 'True Detective' and 'Fargo'

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Entertainment Geekly is a weekly column that examines pop culture through a geek lens and simultaneously examines contemporary geek culture through a pop lens. So many lenses!

To clarify the headline above: I liked True Detective and Fargo. They were well-acted, well-shot, well-dialogued. HBO’s mystery melodrama and FX’s Coen remix had different tones and different site-specific atmospheres–moody nihilism vs. screwball nihilism, sunbaked desolation vs. snowcaked void, Southern Swamp Gothic vs. Frozen Norman Rockwell–but if you watched them live when they aired, then you knitted together an 18-episode viewing experience representing a snapshot of Why TV Drama Is Interesting Now.

True Detective and Fargo are the foremost exemplars of a new way of producing television. Pick your buzzword: Limited series, anthology, movie stars who want to play something besides Superhero or Superhero’s Father. And the two shows rhyme somehow. They both have severe third-act time jumps; they both have an attention-grabbing long take action scene; and they both so badly want to say something about something. Lead characters speak in koans: “Time is a flat circle,” the glove on the train platform. Billy Bob Thornton on Fargo is a distant relative of the Yellow King on True Detective: Omnipresent yet absent, a chameleon hiding in plain sight. Rust and Marty equal Molly and Gus, archetype-wise (the Cop Who Gets Obsessed, the Cop With The Symbolic Daughter). Fargo is funnier and True Detective is sadder and True Detective is sexier and Fargo has actual female characters. They’re both noir, though, or trying to be: They’re both meditations on the Evil, on Life, on man’s place in the universe or lack thereof. If you watched them, you watched two of the best dramas of 2014.

Hannibal blows them both out of the water. READ FULL STORY

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