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Tag: Entertainment Geekly (11-20 of 70)

Entertainment Geekly Podcast: 'Sherlock' and the 2014 Geek preview

This week on the Entertainment Geekly podcast, Jeff Jensen and I talk about the somewhat-controversial-or-maybe-not decision that Benedict Cumberbatch’s super-sleuth made at the climax of the latest season of Sherlock. The result is a minor reprise of last summer’s epic Man of Steel debate — albeit calmer and less intense, since we’re older and wiser now. Suggestion for further reading: Jeff’s essay about the Sherlock finale. (Spoilers, natch.)

Then it’s time to look at the year ahead at the things that excite us. Some of them are totally original (Interstellar!) and some of them are somewhat less original (the eighth Planet of the Apes movie) — not that there’s anything wrong with that. READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly: The meaning of Super Bowl commercials, and how to fix them

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Entertainment Geekly is a weekly column that examines pop culture through a geek lens and simultaneously examines contemporary geek culture through a pop lens. So many lenses!

Do Super Bowl commercials really matter? Yes. Shut up. Sure, it seems strange that we should think about, care about, or devote any deeper-than-shallow national attention to advertisements representing millions of dollars invested by companies worth billions of dollars in the hopes that you, me, and everyone we know will give them at least hundreds of dollars. Did the great philosophers ever grapple with the subtext of a billboard? Did John Keats ever write a poem about a newspaper advertisement for a popular brand of absinthe? No. But Keats also didn’t live long enough to see a puppy fall in love with a horse. READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly Essentials: Does 'Calvin and Hobbes' deserve more respect?

Entertainment Geekly is a weekly column that examines pop culture through a geek lens and simultaneously examines contemporary geek culture through a pop lens. So many lenses! Sometimes we’ll look back at an essential part of the last twenty-five years of geek history. Today: A comic strip about a boy and his tiger.

I don’t think we love Calvin and Hobbes enough, and I’m trying to figure out whether I’m crazy for thinking that or if everyone else is crazy for not realizing that. I do know that saying “Calvin and Hobbes is underrated” is the equivalent of arguing that Meryl Streep deserves more Oscars, or that Breaking Bad didn’t get enough respect. Bill Watterson published the comic strip from 1985 through 1995, and during that time it became so popular that he was allowed to colonize half a page of every Sunday newspaper in the nation — a move that initially smacked of hubris but produced some of the greatest artwork in the history of the newspaper comic strip. READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly Podcast: 'Rick and Morty' and 'Adventure Time'

Entertainment Geekly gets animated this week! While my usual co-host Jeff Jensen is away on a secret mission, I’m joined by Keith Staskiewicz for a chat about the new Adult Swim series Rick and Morty, the Back to the Future riff that has already established itself as one of the weirdest new shows of the season. We also talk about Adventure Time, which shares a network, a night, and a general sense of go-for-broke madcap geekery (albeit in a way that’s much safer for children.) Oh, and we talk about Moral Orel. Because everyone should be talking about Moral Orel all the time. READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly: Why are we so obsessed with the 1980s?

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Entertainment Geekly is a weekly column that examines pop culture through a geek lens and simultaneously examines contemporary geek culture through a pop lens. So many lenses!

Measuring time in specific decades is a fallacy, but it’s a fallacy that everyone believes in. There’s no legitimate reason that we should set aside the passage of time between January 1, 1980 and December 31, 1989 as a specific and clearly defined unit of time. 1979 wasn’t too different from 1980; most of the movies released in 1990 were probably shot in 1989. People used to refer to the ’80s as “the MTV Decade” before every decade became some kind of MTV Decade — but it’s worth remembering that MTV’s ridiculously iconic debut video, “Video Killed the Radio Star,” featured a song written in 1978. READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly Podcast: 'Sleepy Hollow' and 'Community'

The Entertainment Geekly podcast continues its tour through television this week, as fellow traveler Jeff Jensen and I explore the just-concluded first season of Sleepy Hollow and the rebooted fifth season of Community. Jeff and I also throw out our three favorite episodes of Community, although those short lists of three quickly spiral into an interlocking double-helix list of several. Suggestions for further reading: Jeff’s review of Community‘s return and my review of Sleepy Hollow‘s season.

Listen to the complete podcast below or check us out in the iTunes store. Tweet arguments and counterarguments to us at @EWDocJensen and @DarrenFranich.
READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly: 'Her,' 'Fight Club,' and days of future present

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Entertainment Geekly is a weekly column that examines pop culture through a geek lens and simultaneously examines contemporary geek culture through a pop lens. So many lenses!

I finally saw Her this week and now all I can think about is Fight Club. Surface-level, I’ll admit: Not much in common. Fight Club is badass and bloody and chilly and exhaustively cool. Her is mournful and sweet and confessional and strenuously twee. Fight Club is a dude movie about dudes who can’t stop talking about what dudes they are; Helena Bonham Carter plays the local representative of The Female Gender as a Manic Pixie Dream Madonna-Whore Complex. Her is about one man surrounded by women: An ex-wife, a bad date, a best friend, a woman who is everywhere and nowhere at once.
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Entertainment Geekly Podcast: 'True Detective' and 'American Horror Story'

The Entertainment Geekly podcast returns today with a TV-centric episode focusing on the TV shows we’re currently obsessed with. First off, me and co-conspirator Jeff Jensen talk about HBO’s new noir True Detective. From there, we dive deep into the American Horror Story ocean, debating the merits of this season’s Coven versus the crazy-house opera that was Asylum. Suggestions for further reading: Jeff’s full take on True Detective and my recaps of Coven.
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Entertainment Geekly: The speech Michael Bay was going to give at CES

Entertainment Geekly is a weekly column that examines pop culture through a geek lens and simultaneously examines contemporary geek culture through a pop lens. So many lenses! Click here for past columns.

Michael Bay made headlines this week, but not the good kind like you want. The director of films like Transformers and Transformers took a break from making his third or fourth Transformers to appear onstage at the Computer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. Samsung wanted him to say a few words about their new curved TV. Bay began his speech with the tantalizing declaration, “I get to dream for a living.” He quickly became flustered by a #TeleprompterFail, departing the stage with a polite but firm apology. (The director later explained the incident on his blog.)

Entertainment Geekly has obtained the complete transcript of Bay’s original speech, which follows: READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly: My Top 100 Disney Things, off the top of my head

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Entertainment Geekly is a weekly column that examines contemporary pop culture through a geek lens and simultaneously examines contemporary geek culture through a pop lens. So many lenses! Click here for past columns.

Last week I wrote a long and rant-y column about the Disney Myth, as constructed in Saving Mr. Banks and deconstructed in Escape From Tomorrow. In an effort to prove I’m not the world’s biggest grouch — and because I spent the past week in the metaphorical Disneyland known as “being back home with my family for the holidays” — I decided to try an experiment that would prove just how completely Disney has colonized our minds. But, like, in a fun way.

Without resorting to the internet, I tried to make a list of my Top 100 Disney Things: Official Disney-branded movies, TV shows, interactive experiences, whatever, all ranked in the chronological order that they popped into my mind. It was sort of a pop culture version of a Proust memory experience, with one vividly recalled childhood memory leading into another. I recommend making your own Disney Top 100, especially if you’re A) bored or B) in the mood to get a couple dozen songs stuck in your head.
READ FULL STORY

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