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Tag: DC Comics (1-10 of 10)

Entertainment Geekly: Your thoughts on the DC Cinematic Universe

Entertainment Geekly is a weekly column that examines pop culture through a geek lens and simultaneously examines contemporary geek culture through a pop lens. So many lenses!

Last week, I asked a simple question: Is the DC Cinematic Universe–the Warner Bros. back-of-the-napkin plan to launch an all-out assault on Marvel Studios by unleashing a double-digit boatload of superhero movies between now and 2020–actually a thing? Will the Man of Steel-verse actually transform into a cape-ier alternative to the Avengers-verse? Or is this a Valiant-Comics-in-1992 thing–a situation where all the elaborate and ambitious universe-building plans will ultimately dead-end against the cruel capitalist realities of people just not being interested? READ FULL STORY

Warner Bros. is reportedly developing two different 'Aquaman' movies

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And so Warner Bros’ incipient superhero universe continues its aggressive expansion. The Hollywood Reporter claims the studio is currently developing an Aquaman movie—a movie that will likely star Jason “Khal Drogo” Momoa and which is something we should all theoretically be looking forward to, because Aquaman is a cool character, and everyone who thinks Aquaman is a lame character is themselves lame and should be punished by getting forcefully Clockwork Orange‘d through a full-series Entourage marathon. READ FULL STORY

See Batman, Superman, and Wonder Woman go Lego

Lego Batman: Beyond Gotham hits videogame consoles later this year, and to celebrate the arrival of the most important Bat-threequel since The Dark Knight Rises, DC Comics is going Full Block in November. Several of DC’s biggest comics will offer Lego-ized variant covers to spotlight the Lego versions of the biggest DC icons. (The Lego editions continue DC’s current trend for variant covers, which saw steampunk-ified covers back in February and Mike Allred’s groovy retro-cool covers in May.)

Check out the Lego versions of Batman/Superman #16 and Superman/Wonder Woman #13 below. READ FULL STORY

Other DC Comics characters we want on 'Arrow' and 'The Flash'

Warner Bros. didn’t make any announcements at this year’s San Diego Comic-Con regarding future DC Comics films, so who knows when we’ll get a Justice League movie. Thankfully, the CW’s excellent series Arrow and new series The Flash are here to fulfill all of our fangirl/fanboy desires while we wait for an actual JL team-up onscreen.

This fall,  Arrow and The Flash are diving deeper into the DC Universe, bringing many favorites from the comics to the screen. Ra’s Al Ghul, Wildcat, Atom, and Katana will all be introduced on Arrow this season, and The Flash recently cast Robbie Amell—that’s Arrow star Stephen Amell’s cousin—as Ronnie Raymond, who makes up one half of the superhero Firestorm. That’s exciting news for DC fans.

But there is so much more that can done! We’ve put together our wish list for other DC Comics characters we’d like to see introduced in the shared Arrow-Flash television universe. READ FULL STORY

This map of the DC Comics multiverse will blow your mind

Grant Morrison has spent much of his career in comic books sketching out the farthest reaches of the comic cosmos, taking iconic characters like Batman and Superman far beyond our fragile borders of space and time. And the upcoming Multiversity takes Morrison’s fascination with alternate realities to its logical apex. Comprising six adventures set in different parallel universes—along with a two-part framing story and a guidebook to the DC Multiverse—it’s a trippy saga that features iconic variations on the major DC characters: a vampire Justice League, a fascist Superman, and (naturally) Dino-Cop. READ FULL STORY

I'm Still Not Over... the happy ending of the 'Justice League Unlimited' cartoon

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July 23rd is Batman Day, and I can think of no better way to celebrate 75 years of Batman stories than by looking at Justice League Unlimited‘s second season finale “Epilogue”—a Batman-centric episode that honors the character’s legacy, and one that I’m still not over.

Cartoon Network had yet to renew Justice League Unlimited for a third season when “Epilogue” was written, suggesting it was intended to bring the entire DC Animated Universe—which began in 1992 with the premiere of Batman: The Animated Series—to a close. The writers decided to end the DCAU where it all started. “Epilogue” finds a way to give the Batman character an ending that feels earned, and it reminds us of what made Batman so formidable and focuses on a side of him that often goes unnoticed.

Set 65 years in the future in the Gotham City of Batman Beyond, “Epilogue” drops a huge story bombshell: Terry McGinnis (Will Friedle)—the Batman of the future now that Bruce Wayne (Kevin Conroy) has retired—discovers he is Bruce Wayne’s biological son, the result of a genetic experiment that involved overwriting his father’s DNA with Bruce’s DNA. The sole purpose of this experiment: to create a new Batman. When Terry finds out, he assumes that Bruce has masterminded the plan out of his arrogant belief that the world couldn’t go on without him. Having witnessed Bruce’s life in his old age, Terry becomes afraid at the the new revelation; he fears being as alone, cold, and miserable as Bruce is.  READ FULL STORY

Who are Hollywood's biggest stars... when they're stripped of their superpowers?

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In the current era of The Avengers and Batman Vs. Superman, it’s impossible to be a fan of the comic-book genre and not have a well-considered argument to the question, “Who’s the Most Powerful Superhero?” Superman, of course, is the most obvious answer in any superpower battle-royale debate, but there are strong and more interesting claims to be made for the others, too. (Except Hawkeye. Sorry, guy.)

In Hollywood offices, there are similar conversations going on all the time about their own legion of superheroes, those famous actors and actresses who can open a movie in New York, Nebraska, and Nepal, whether it be a romance, an action-adventure, or a raunchy comedy. But with more and more of the industry now tilted towards Comic-Con-approved tent-pole pictures, the pecking order for actors today is heavily weighted by his or her ability to land a major role in a superhero franchise. It is the lifeblood of a long and prosperous career. For example, playing Batman not only elevated Christian Bale to the Hollywood A-list — positioning the indie actor for other major studio movie roles — but his enhanced financial security allowed him to continue to gamble on the eclectic roles he preferred in the first place, in movies like The Fighter and Rescue Dawn.

When the right actor gets the right superhero role, it becomes virtually impossible to separate the artist from the character. The cape becomes part of their public persona, one that can help or hinder their other on-screen roles. But what happens when Hollywood’s heroes are stripped of their superpowers? That is to say, what is Robert Downey Jr. without Tony Stark’s armor? What is Hugh Jackman when his Wolverine claws are clipped? Do we still pay to see their movies, or do we give them the cold-shoulder, like old-school Lois Lane used to give old-school Clark Kent? Who is the most powerful superstar when they’re nothing more or less than their Hollywood alter ego?

After looking at the actors and actresses who are major players in current comic-book franchises, we examined their recent box-office and critical reputation when they’re not in costume, and then ranked them in order to see who really flies the highest and has the biggest muscles in the movie universe. READ FULL STORY

'Arrow' vs. 'Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.': Are the DC and Marvel worlds colliding?

This week, my Tuesday and Wednesday nights looked eerily similar, and not just because I was sitting on my couch eating Chinese food and watching television.

On Tuesday’s Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., the team headed to Russia to defuse a very large, very dangerous weapon. The very next night, my Arrow peeps discovered they needed to rescue one of their own from — what do ya know? — Russia. Plus, by the end of Arrow‘s hour, I was listening to talk of a serum that could be used to create an army of super soldiers. For a second, I was positive I was back in the S.H.I.E.L.D. universe talking about Centipede. But I wasn’t! I was on a boat in the middle of the ocean — in the middle of a universe where “superheroes” didn’t exist. What was happening?!

So after I realized that these were, in fact, two very different shows, one of which lives in the Marvel universe (S.H.I.E.L.D., obviously) and the other in DC Comics, I started to get a very bad headache. Not to mention that while reacting to both shows, I now have to deal with an annoying number of period-filled acronyms — S.H.I.E.L.D., A.R.G.U.S., H.I.V.E — not cool, guys. Basically, after having this realization, I only had one option: A compare-and-contrast, seventh-grade-style.
READ FULL STORY

Alan Moore: 'League of Extraordinary Gentlemen' show is 'dustbin' hunting

There have been 33 feature films based on DC Comics since 1951, yet the Hollywood history of DC has been largely limited to a trio of characters too vivid to exist in the real world: Batman, Superman, and Alan Moore.

The first two everyone knows. The third is a British writer who, while not technically a fictional character, is absolutely a character of the highest order. But in what way does he rank with the caped legends? Four of Moore’s brilliant comic book epics have been adapted by Hollywood: Watchmen, V for Vendetta, The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, and From Hell. A fifth film, Constantine, was based on a character he created, and a sixth, Return of the Swamp Thing, was propelled by his landmark three-year work on bog monster’s series.

Those individual movies range from underrated and okay (Watchmen, Constantine) to overcooked and odious (League of Extraordinary Gentlemen). But collectively, they put Moore’s bookshelf not far behind Gotham City lore (nine Batman movies plus the stray spinoff Catwoman) and Metropolis mythology (the seventh Superman film is now in theaters, plus Supergirl and Steel, which were as bizarro-stupid as they sound.)

Moore lives in Northampton,  England, the same place he was born 59 years ago. Since then, he’s covered a lot of territory, and not just in this dimension. Moore’s interesting look — a bushy prophet beard, a menacing sorcerer’s glare, and metallic talons on his fingers — fit a guy who identified himself as an anarchist and (with a wink) a worshiper of Glycon, the 2nd Century snake god. But even with all that, it was only after Moore refused to cash his Hollywood paychecks that his industry peers began to wonder about his grip.

Moore is no forest hermit despite some past press portrayals, but he does live off the grid if your definition of “basic shelter” includes wi-fi coverage. “I have very few connections with the 21st century, actually,” Moore said last week over the most modern of connections: a landline telephone with a curly cord stretching all the way to the 20th century.

The line was busy the first couple times I dialed, but Moore picked up on my third try and I found (just like the first time I interviewed him, back in 2008) that there was far more mischief in his voice than malice, even when he took shots at DC Comics and Hollywood, which he sees as factories that grind art (and artists) into pulp that can be sold, recycled, and then sold again in new shapes.

The topic is timely: Moore’s name was in Hollywood headlines last week when reports surfaced that Fox has ordered up a League of Extraordinary Gentleman television pilot with hopes that a savvy small-screen take on the material could right the many wrongs made by director Stephen Norrington’s 2003 film (which notoriously drove star Sean Connery into retirement). [Read Owen Gleiberman's review here.]

That same television do-over approach worked for Fox with Buffy the Vampire Slayer, but that series had the character’s creator, Joss Whedon, on board to show the way. Moore laughed when asked if he or League artist and co-creator Kevin O’Neill would be involved in any way with the broadcast venture.

NEXT: “It seems they are recycling things that have already proven not to work.”

This Week's Cover: Superman at 75

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Time really does fly.

For three-quarters of a century, Superman has been fighting the good fight, keeping Earth and its inhabitants safe from all manner of villainy and disaster. As the DC Comics character turns 75, he’s also getting a major big-screen relaunch in director Zack Snyder’s Man of Steel, opening Friday.

So for this week’s cover, Entertainment Weekly is taking a look back at all the critical moments in Superman’s evolution from dimestore hero to American pop-culture icon. We start with his first appearance in 1938’s Action Comics #1, and track him along every major step (and occasional misstep) up through his reemergence in the form of Man of Steel‘s angry, passionate, lost Superman, as played by Henry Cavill.

Here’s what you can find in EW’s obsessive history of the man in the red cape:

READ FULL STORY

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