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Tag: Comic Books (1-10 of 403)

'Star Wars' exclusive: Check out this Alex Ross cover for Marvel's 'Star Wars #1'

Marvel published an ongoing Star Wars comic book for nearly a decade. The first issue went on sale in April 1977, and the series lasted until 1986, a time when it totally made sense for Lando Calrissian to wear whatever he’s wearing in this picture. In 2015, the Star Wars universe returns to Marvel, with the company launching a new ongoing Star Wars series in January 2015. Written by Jason Aaron and drawn by John Cassaday, the series focuses on the original-trilogy gang of Han, Luke, and Leia. READ FULL STORY

The race for 'The Black Vortex': Marvel Comics' next Guardians/X-Men event

This February, the Guardians of the Galaxy and the X-Men will be teaming up in Guardians of the Galaxy/X-Men: The Black Vortex, a cosmic comic-book adventure that will send the two teams into the far reaches of space on the hunt for The Black Vortex, an object of immense power.

So what is The Black Vortex? According to Sam Humphries, the crossover’s lead writer speaking in advance of his panel today at New York Comic Con, it is an immensely powerful object with the ability to unlock the cosmic potential that lies within anyone. “So if you play guitar,” says Humphries, “The Black Vortex can unlock the potential within you to play like Jimmy Page, and Jimmy Hendrix, and George Harrison all at the same time.” READ FULL STORY

Go big or go home: Why Marvel's new 'Secret Wars' could be too much

For comic book fans of a certain age, few comic book stories are remembered as fondly as Marvel’s 1984 mega-hit Secret Wars. A yearlong series that birthed countless Marvel fans, Secret Wars was memorable, even if the story—standard rock ‘em, sock ‘em stuff—doesn’t hold up. Now, thirty years later, Secret Wars is happening again.

The news was announced Thursday night at the Avengers S.T.A.T.I.O.N. exhibit in Times Square at New York Comic-Con. Marvel exec Dan Buckley only had the scantest of details to share: the event will be written by Jonathan Hickman as part of the multi-year saga he’s been writing in the pages of Avengers and New Avengers since he relaunched the titles in 2012. The event will be drawn by Esad Ribic, who just wrapped up an absolutely classic run on Thor: God of Thunder,  and will begin in May 2015. READ FULL STORY

Why Kirby v. Marvel mattered

In 2014, it’s quite common to know almost every detail behind the production of a superhero movie before the movie is even released. From the release date to the cast to the director to screenwriters, every detail is examined and disseminated across myriad blogs and social media sites, to the point where, if you’re even mildly interested, you could easily find out the names of those responsible for getting that film to your local cinema.

But how about the people who created the characters in the pages of comic books?

In the early days of comic books, the relationship between creators and publishers was often exploitative. Many of the people responsible for creating the heroes that would make publishers millions were freelancers, working from home, never making a regular salary outside of their normal page rates and often struggling to get back their original artwork, collect royalties, or even get the level of credit due to them. People create pop culture, not corporations.

Of all those people, few have gotten the short shrift like Jacob Kurtzberg, better known as Jack Kirby.

READ FULL STORY

A look inside Nigeria's very own Comic-Con

Avengers-Age-of-Ultron-Vedova-Nera-Teaser-Poster

Comic books have some of the most active and involved fans of any medium, and comics conventions are a big part of that. Despite the immense popularity of comics-inspired movies in theaters every year, the majority of published comics don’t sell very many copies—the average number of copies a book at both Marvel and DC, the biggest names in the business, tends to sit at 50,000 or less, with the top 10 clocking in six figures and the rest less than half that. Because of this, comics heavily rely on the support of a small and passionate fanbase. Comic cons are an important part of the industry, and they just don’t happen in San Diego and New York.

Case in point: Nigeria’s Lagos Comic-Con. READ FULL STORY

Scotland's independence vote decided a superhero's fate, for some reason

SCOTSMAN

On Thursday, Sept. 18, Scottish citizens partook in an historic and pivotal vote that would determine the future of the United Kingdom. This they knew, and so did the rest of the world. However, unbeknownst to most of them, they were also deciding the future of a comic book superhero.

As reported by Comic Book Resources, on Wednesday U.K. comics publisher Eco Comics  unveiled an “All-new, all-Scottish” superhero named Scotsman. (Not making this up.) Unlike Captain America—who actually wears something closer to the Puerto Rican flag as his costume—Scotsman’s sartorial choices proudly reflect the iconography of the Scottish flag. They also less proudly reflect the country’s most widely known contribution to the global wardrobe, the kilt. Scotsman doesn’t really have a kilt—it’s more of a patterned shirttail. Instead, he has pants, which is kind of a shame.

But what makes Scotsman truly notable is Eco’s plans for stories involving him—how some of them will play out hinged on the decision reached by the vote for Scottish independence. See, the publisher has another character, named Englishman (still not making this up) and the vote’s outcome would determine Scotsman’s relationship with his English counterpart.

Now that the Scottish people have decided to remain a part of the United Kingdom, it seems that the two will be staunch friends. Which is a shame, because Scotsman v. Englishman: Dawn of the Ayes is a movie I’d see.

'Spider-Woman #1' has a special variant cover that is causing some controversy for some reason

Good news: Marvel has a new comic book starring a female character! Better news: That female character is Spider-Woman, a.k.a. Jessica Drew,  a severely underrated B-lister who hasn’t had a solo non-limited series since the late ’70s. Best news: Spider-Woman will team up Jessica with Silk, another female superhero, therefore all-but-assuring that Spider-Woman will be passing the Bechdel Test all over the place. READ FULL STORY

See Batman, Superman, and Wonder Woman go Lego

Lego Batman: Beyond Gotham hits videogame consoles later this year, and to celebrate the arrival of the most important Bat-threequel since The Dark Knight Rises, DC Comics is going Full Block in November. Several of DC’s biggest comics will offer Lego-ized variant covers to spotlight the Lego versions of the biggest DC icons. (The Lego editions continue DC’s current trend for variant covers, which saw steampunk-ified covers back in February and Mike Allred’s groovy retro-cool covers in May.)

Check out the Lego versions of Batman/Superman #16 and Superman/Wonder Woman #13 below. READ FULL STORY

Batman at 75: DC Comics co-publisher discusses the Dark Knight's future

Batman Day is finally here, and as part of DC Comics’ year-long celebration of the Dark Knight’s 75th anniversary, comic-book stores everywhere are giving away a free special edition of Detective Comics #27, which features a retelling of the Dark Knight’s first appearance by Brad Meltzer.

In honor of the big day, EW spoke to DC Comics co-publisher Jim Lee to discuss all things Batman: the character’s 75th anniversary, the most memorable Batman stories from the past 75 years , the new Batman titles coming in the fall and where he sees the Caped Crusader going in the next 75 years.

EW: We’re halfway through the year-long celebration of Batman’s 75th anniversary and there’s still a ton of Batman-related things to come: Fox’s Gothamwhich looks great from the trailer, is premiering in the fall, and DC is also launching some new titles. What are you looking forward to in the back half of the celebration? 
Jim Lee: You’ve got Gotham, which like you said looks tremendous. There’s a lot of anticipation and excitement for that.  You’ve got these great series launching, like Batgirl, which I think is in October. We have the release of the Batman ’66 Blu-ray set, which I have been waiting literally all my life for. I’ve got these crappy bootleg video tapes that I’ve kind of acquired over the years—mysteriously. To finally have those episodes, with the pristine quality and all of these episodes of my youth that I’ve never been able to catch up on and share with my family is going to be a great opportunity. I expect there to be a lot of viewing parties come this fall. READ FULL STORY

Batman at 75: Jim Lee and Bruce Timm talk most memorable comic stories

On July 23, comic book stores everywhere will celebrate Batman Day as part of DC Comics’ yearlong celebration of the Caped Crusader’s 75th anniversary. In anticipation of the big day, EW conducted separate interviews with DC Comics co-publisher Jim Lee and Batman the Animated Series creator and producer Bruce Timm, asking each to pick the most memorable and significant Batman stories of the past 75 years.

Both Lee and Timm have be heavily involved with Batman throughout their careers. Apart from being co-publisher of DC (alongside Dan Didio), Lee has illustrated several Batman comics including Batman: Hush with writer Jeph Loeb and All Star Batman & Robin, the Boy Wonder with legendary writer Frank Miller. In addition to his work on Batman the Animated Series and the rest of the DC Animated Universe, Timm has produced  several animated feature film adaptations of Batman classic Batman stories including Batman: Year One, The Dark Knight Returns, and Batman: Under the Red Hood.

When asked to pinpoint Batman’s greatest arcs, both men cited a few usual suspects— Batman: Year One and The Dark Knight Returns. But each list also contained a few surprises, revealing each one’s knowledge and love of the character’s history. Here’s what they had to say: READ FULL STORY

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