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Jerry Seinfeld names his favorite funny movies -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

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The second season of Jerry Seinfeld’s Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee kicked off last week with a killer episode featuring Sarah Silverman. This week, David Letterman joins Seinfeld on his quest for caffeine via a cool ride; that episode will go live at Noon today over at the show’s official website and at Crackle.

For an even bigger Seinfeld fix, check out this week’s issue of Entertainment Weekly, which features Seinfeld’s explanation of the whole CICGC phenomenon in his own words. The conversation with the comedy legend diverted into all sorts of other areas (much like an episode of his new series), and he revealed to EW his five favorite funny films of all time.

His picks are eclectic, and they include at least one movie that is definitely not a comedy. Check out Seinfeld’s picks in the exclusive video below.  READ FULL STORY

'Anchorman 2' trailer: It's kind of a big deal. Let's do a deep dive!

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Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues isn’t the sort of film that normally demands the deep dive treatment. Careful frame-by-frame analyses are generally reserved for big-name adaptations, franchise-extending summer blockbusters, and comic book-based extravaganzas — you know, action movies with rich mythologies and lots of things that go “boom.”

But even if this clip is devoid of space ships, costumed heroes, and fights to the death, it’s chock-full of intriguing new characters, tantalizing plot tidbits, and righteous mustaches — making it the perfect candidate for some good, old-fashioned obsessive scrutiny.
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Dan Harmon apologizes for trashing 'Community' season 4: 'I was not thinking about anyone but myself'

And thus another Harmontroversy draws to a close — at least, until the Community creator ruffles another set of feathers. (In other words: Watch this space.)

In a lengthy post that appeared on his personal Tumblr about five hours ago, Dan Harmon apologized profusely for badmouthing Community‘s fourth season during the most recent edition of his “Harmontown” podcast. The brutally, suicidally honest writer was recorded comparing the experience of watching those 13 episodes to “flipping through Instagram just watching your girlfriend blow everyone” and “being held down and watching your family get raped on a beach.”

The general gist of Harmon’s apologia: He spoke without considering anyone’s feelings but his own. “After five seconds of thinking, I realized, as usual, that other people might be hurt, and that I really need to do this whole ‘saying things and thinking about other people’ cycle in a different order at some point,” Harmon admitted. “I was very much not thinking about anyone but myself while watching that season, which was the crime [...] I was just indulging my petty feelings about being left out. It seemed kind of funny at the time because it seemed at the time like I was the only person with feelings.”

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Dan Harmon compares watching season 4 of 'Community' to... some terrible stuff

Only one thing could get Dan Harmon to watch the fourth season of Community, the NBC sitcom that was so cruelly ripped away from him last spring: being reinstated as his creation’s executive producer.

And now that he has watched it… hoo boy.

Harmon spilled his thoughts during the most recent edition of “Harmontown,” the digressive comedy show-slash-podcast he hosts with Jeff B. Davis each week. At first, his reaction was fairly tame; Harmon said he felt comfortable calling the season “not my cup of tea,” since it was obviously an “impression, and an unflattering one” of Community under his own stewardship. (The episodes in a nutshell, according to Harmon: “DURRRR! I’m Dan Harmon! DURRRR!”)

But after that assessment, Harmon got a little more graphic — comparing sitting through this past season to “flipping through Instagram just watching your girlfriend blow everyone” and seeing a friend “Like” a photo of your ex-girlfriend with her new boyfriend on Facebook.

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For Father's Day, skip the U.S. Open and watch more 'Caddyshack'

Does the U.S. Open always fall on the same weekend as Father’s Day because of the stereotype that if you have fathered a child, you automatically love golf? It’s a strange confluence of events, but it seems to work for some people, as no fewer than 27 million dads will get some sort of lame golf-related gift this weekend.

But let’s face it: Golf is boring. Strike that—golf is deadly boring. The most boring.

But forget all that, because the one silver lining to all this golf talk is that it’s an excellent excuse to talk about Caddyshack one more time. A lot of comedies from that era have not aged particularly well, but Caddyshack holds up, partially because golf will always seem sort of silly, and partially because of the commitment from both Chevy Chase, Rodney Dangerfield and Bill Murray, all of whom turn in instant-classic performances. Not only that, but it established them all as bankable movie stars, all of whom would have major studio pictures built around them in the coming years.

To celebrate the greatness of Caddyshack, the folks over at YEAH! have put together a cool infographic that runs down Caddyshack by the numbers. Highlights include: Six (the number of days Murray actually worked on the film), 10,000 (the number of gallons of water used during the famous scene where Murray’s Carl Spackler floods the gopher hole), and $117,613,400 (the domestic box office in today’s dollars).

Click the image above for the full graphic, or check it out right here.

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Patton Oswalt rethinks his stance on rape jokes in thoughtful essay

Sorry, Daniel Tosh: You just lost an ally. In a treatise of over 6,000 words, comedian Patton Oswalt Friday spoke out on the rape joke controversy, pointedly retracting his support of Tosh’s stance to make jokes about anything, regardless of subject matter.

But first, let’s rewind. Last summer, the host of Tosh.0 found himself in a sticky situation after a spectator complained about the way she was treated at one of his shows. Specifically: As Tosh was allegedly riffing about how hilarious rape jokes are at an open mike, the spectator felt moved to shout out, “Actually, rape is never funny!” By her account, Tosh paused, then said, “Wouldn’t it be funny if that girl got raped by like, five guys right now? Like right now? What if a bunch of guys just raped her…?”

While Tosh issued an apology for the incident — “all the out of context misquotes aside” — it sparked a long-simmering conversation about feminism, the male-dominated comedy community, and what is and isn’t acceptable in making light of horrific and tragic topics. Tosh’s opponents argued that there’s a difference between jokes that lampoon the absurdity of rape culture — an attitude that normalizes, excuses, and tolerates sexual assault — and jokes that mock the victims of that assault. Tosh’s supporters, by contrast, accused his opponents of censorship, saying that there should be no limits on what comedians should be able to joke about.

Among the people in that second camp: Patton Oswalt, who told EW at Comic-Con that while he didn’t agree with what Tosh said, he thought it was “very dangerous to create an atmosphere where people can’t f— up,” since open mikes are meant as safe spaces for comedians to try out new material.
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Jerry Seinfeld's 'Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee' returns with Sarah Silverman, David Letterman, and lots of caffeine

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Back in the summer of 2012, one of comedy’s biggest names found a new home for himself: the Internet. And now he’s back for more.

On Thursday afternoon, Jerry Seinfeld — the man synonymous with sponge-worthiness, close talkers, and pretty much any television comedy catchphrase in the late ’90s — will unveil the first episode of the new season of Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee. The show’s title is very literal: Each episode pairs Seinfeld with another comedian, puts them in a cool old car, and features a conversation over caffeinated beverages.

The concept is simple, but the results are often thrilling. (And also award-winning.) The first season saw episodes featuring Larry David, Ricky Gervais, Mel Brooks, Colin Quinn, and Michael Richards, and each one featured revelatory chats about the nature of comedy, a subject Seinfeld finds endlessly fascinating. “Comedians never fail to get to this subject of, ‘How do you do this?’ or ‘What’s it like for you?’ or ‘What are you dealing with?’” Seinfeld told EW in a recent conversation. “So in almost every one of these shows, in fact I have to eventually say every single one at some point, these two people get to that.”

This season’s premiere, which will be available on Crackle and on the show’s official website at noon Thursday, features Sarah Silverman. Other guests this time around include David Letterman, Chris Rock, and Seth Meyers. Check out the preview of the new season below.
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Point/counterpoint: Can Dan Harmon's return save 'Community'?

The good news: Dan Harmon is probably coming back to Community! The bad news, possibly: Dan Harmon is probably coming back to Community. Will this move revive NBC’s crazy college-based show — or could it spell certain doom? Here’s how two EW writers see things.

DARREN FRANICH: I really enjoyed the first three seasons of Community. The show wasn’t perfect by any means, but what I liked about it was the total go-for-broke spirit, the sense that every episode took a concept that could’ve been gimmicky — Law & Order spoof! Spaghetti western! Alternate-universe chaos theory! — and then rapaciously attacked it from every angle

I credit that spirit entirely to Dan Harmon, who is by all accounts an insane person who pours everything of himself into his work and desperately wants to make great television. When Harmon was fired from his post as showrunner, he immediately became a sanctified Great Man Of Television, because everyone loves a martyr.

But martyrs are boring. I was worried that Harmon would spend his post-Community career playing the martyr — which, much as I love him, is basically what Conan O’Brien did post-Tonight Show. Without Harmon, Community was pretty boring too: Even when it was funny, it never felt insane the way that old Community could.

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Jonah Hill, Serious Actor, didn't come here to talk about farting

When it comes to passing gas, This Is the End star James Franco takes a covert approach: “I don’t do it in public, but when I’m at home in bed, I’ll fart! And on a plane, I’ll let it go,” he enthuses to Rolling Stone in the magazine’s latest cover story featuring the apocalyptic comedy’s cast. After all, adds Franco, “on a plane, nobody can hear you fart.” (Remind us never to travel with James Franco.)

Franco’s costar Seth Rogen is even more open about his habits. “I will say I’m a pretty bad farter from time to time,” he confesses. “I have a Japanese toilet at home that cleans my ass for me — it’s great. I only like to sh– at home, so I get some pretty bad farts during the day.”

But one This Is the End cast member is too reserved — or maybe just too self-important — to discuss his farting habits: Jonah Hill, whose eyes “nearly jumped out of their sockets” when Rolling Stone asked how often he lets ‘em rip. “I’m not answering that dumb question!” Hill complained to the magazine. “I’m not that kind of person! Being in a funny movie doesn’t make me have to answer dumb questions. It has nothing to do with who I am.”

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Ricky Gervais on 'Learn Guitar With David Brent': Write about what you DON'T know -- VIDEO

David Brent has really done well for himself since being made redundant at Wernham Hogg back in 2002. He’s got a fulfilling day job (selling cleaning products!) and a promising night job (acting as the “local Simon Cowell” for an aspiring musician), he’s had a chance to visit the U.S.… and he’s even moonlighting as a guitar teacher on YouTube. Yep, there’s no reason to feel sorry for good ol’ David Brent. None at all.

In this second episode of “Learn Guitar with David Brent,” the teacher breezes past boring instruction to deliver words of wisdom — “Dreams. Dreams are real. Dreams are realer than reality, in a way, because reality changes! Dreams do as well, but…” — and play a song about selling his (nonexistent) shack in Memphis and heading down to Mexico (on a trip he hasn’t actually taken).

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