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Tag: Books (11-20 of 38)

PopWatch Planner: 'The Voice' premieres, 'Scandal' returns, and The Fray's new album hits shelves

Aaaannnd exhale. After weeks of Olympic coverage, it’s just about time to get back to our regularly scheduled programming. My DVR might not be happy about, but I’m over the moon.

This is the week when your favorite shows find their way back to your TV screens. From the long-awaited returns of Scandal and Grey’s Anatomy to the season premieres of Dallas and The Voice, it’s hard to go wrong with your television choices. Meanwhile, at the theater, Liam Neeson is heating up the screen, and elsewhere, we’ve found book and album releases that are not to be missed. Basically, you’ve got a lot of work to do this week. Enjoy!

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What was your favorite fiction book of 2013? POLL

From a tale about an Afghan village to a summer camp in upstate New York, this year’s best books took us around the world and back again. Our critics already picked their top 10 of the year; now tell us in the poll below which of the books that came out this year was your favorite to curl up next to the fire with, or take to the comments to let us know what we left out.

Happy reading!
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Adapt This: Wally Lamb's 'I Know This Much Is True'

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There’s nothing new under the sun — but somehow, these awesome properties have never been adapted for screens big or small. Psst, Hollywood: Let’s change that.

There are many great books that have never been adapted for the screen, and quite a few of them are better off because of it. Keeping that in mind, I’m hesitant to recommend such a great book undergo the adaptation process, but the more I think about how good an adaptation of Wally Lamb’s I Know This Much Is True could be, the more I know I have to put the thought out into the universe.

Today, there’s almost nothing a viewer loves more than a good twist. That’s the thing that gets people to tweet about a film or a television show. And that’s only one reason why I Know This Much Is True would make for a great big-screen drama. READ FULL STORY

Harry Shum Jr. remembers trauma of watching 'Old Yeller' -- VIDEO

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Harry Shum Jr. was on a few quests when he visited the EW L.A. offices last month. The first was an important one: Spread the word about his collaboration with Coca-Cola and the (RED) campaign to end the spread of mother-to-child transmission of HIV.

As part of the campaign, the public is urged to upload dance videos to Instagram using the hashtag #CokeREDMovies, and for every thousand videos uploaded, Coca-Cola will make a donation to the Global Fund. (Each donation will provide more than 60 days of life-saving medicine for someone living with HIV.)

“Right now what we want to do is raise awareness through dancing and we want to end mother-to-child transmission of HIV by 2015,” Shum said. “Every day, 700 babies are born with HIV, and we can be the generation that gets that number to zero.”

The other reason Shum came to the office was less important but just as fun as dancing: He took the EW Pop Culture Personality Test. The result is below!
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Jennifer Lawrence, 'Hunger Games' cast on their favorite YA books of all time

EW readers are in the midst of a bitter battle to crown the greatest YA book of all time. So who better to influence your opinions than the cast of one of the most popular young adult series of the moment — The Hunger Games.

At the London premiere for the upcoming The Hunger Games: Catching Fire (in theaters Nov. 22), Jennifer Lawrence, Josh Hutcherson, and more opened up about their favorite YA series.
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Adapt This: Francesca Lia Block's 'Weetzie Bat'

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There’s nothing new under the sun — but somehow, these awesome properties have never been adapted for screens big or small. Psst, Hollywood: Let’s change that.

Weetzie Bat is a short novel by Francesca Lia Block that reads like a candied love song for young, artistic misfits. If you’ve never heard of it, think Perks of Being a Wallflower meets Catcher in the Rye meets Sixteen Candles. The first in the Dangerous Angels series, it’s the kind of book that doesn’t quite fit amongst the stacks of action-adventure plots, prim teenage sleuths, and Blume-ian freckled kids in the YA world — much like the protagonist, Weetzie, doesn’t quite fit in the superficial, plastic world of her high school. Weetzie and her gay best friend Dirk, who comes out to her in the novel, look for their soul mates (whom they call their “ducks”) and ways to have unconventional fun in an 80’s-set Los Angeles wonderland (like grabbing burritos at Oki Dog and cruising around in a ’55 red Pontiac dressed in 1950s garb).
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Adapt This: Tamora Pierce's amazing 'Alanna' series

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There’s nothing new under the sun — but somehow, these awesome properties have never been adapted for screens big or small. Psst, Hollywood: Let’s change that.

Once upon a time, the idea of studios making big-budget, mainstream fantasy movies — let alone TV series — seemed as unlikely as actually finding a hidden portal to Narnia.

Thankfully, the smashing success of both the Harry Potter films and the Lord of the Rings series changed all that in the early ’00s. Soon enough, the entertainment landscape was crowded with expensive, magically-laced epics, most of which were based on beloved fantasy book series. And though some (Game of Thrones) have been markedly more successful than others (The Golden Compass; The Seeker: The Dark Is Rising; too many more to list), the trend shows no signs of slowing down. This is especially true on TV, where fantasy has never been hotter; this fall’s schedule includes new series like Sleepy Hollow, Dracula, and Once Upon a Time in Wonderland alongside old favorites like Grimm.

For anyone who grew up devouring books about swords and spells, this looks like an embarrassment of riches. Yet I can’t help thinking that there’s still one resource screenwriters would be crazy to keep untapped: the young adult fantasy novels of Tamora Pierce, specifically her Song of the Lioness series.

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What book was Eric reading in the 'True Blood' finale? PopWatch investigates!

If you weren’t immediately distracted by Alexander Skarsgard’s nakedness in the True Blood finale, you may have noticed that Eric was reading a book while lounging on a snow-covered mountaintop in Sweden. EW has confirmed that the book is Den allvarsamma leken by Hjalmar Söderberg. Translation: The Serious Game. According to True Blood showrunner Brian Buckner, it was Skarsgard’s pick: “This was the book that Alex wanted to be reading because it is an old Swedish favorite.”  READ FULL STORY

Chris Colfer takes EW's Pop Culture Personality Test -- VIDEO

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Ask Chris Colfer for his favorite villain in children’s entertainment, and he can’t help but pick the titular character from the second book in his The Land of Stories series, The Enchantress Returns: “I purposely tried to make her a little bit of all the classic villains,” he says of evil Ezmia, who resurfaces long after cursing Sleeping Beauty to strike fear in the fairy-tale world and beyond. “I say she’s deliciously evil.”

Also wicked: Colfer’s sense of humor when he recently stopped by EW to take our Pop Culture Personality Test. Watch the video below. READ FULL STORY

I'm still not over... The heartbreaking ending of 'Bridge to Terabithia'

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Here at EW, we’re reminiscing about the pop culture moments that we still can’t get over — no matter how much time has passed.

Fact #1: A great book you read as a kid will always affect you more deeply than a great book read at any other age.

Fact #2: Katherine Paterson’s Newbery Award-winning Bridge to Terabithia happens to be one of the greatest, saddest, most unforgettable children’s books ever written.

Fact #3: During a summer when Jeff Bridges’ long-in-the-works adaptation of The Giver actually seems to be gaining traction and theaters are finally showing a movie based on a Judy Blume book, it’s only natural to think about other kids’ classics that have made it to the big screen — bringing me back to Terabithia, which received its own overly CGI’d adaptation back in 2007. (The film starred baby Josh Hutcherson, pre-Hunger Games — check out his Bieber hair and chipmunk cheeks!)

All that is a long way of explaining why I found myself musing about Terabithia today — more specifically, about its ending, which has been responsible for more sobbing grade-schoolers than anything this side of Where the Red Fern Grows. (Spoiler alert: The red fern grows on top of dead dogs.) READ FULL STORY

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