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Tag: Books (11-20 of 31)

What book was Eric reading in the 'True Blood' finale? PopWatch investigates!

If you weren’t immediately distracted by Alexander Skarsgard’s nakedness in the True Blood finale, you may have noticed that Eric was reading a book while lounging on a snow-covered mountaintop in Sweden. EW has confirmed that the book is Den allvarsamma leken by Hjalmar Söderberg. Translation: The Serious Game. According to True Blood showrunner Brian Buckner, it was Skarsgard’s pick: “This was the book that Alex wanted to be reading because it is an old Swedish favorite.”  READ FULL STORY

Chris Colfer takes EW's Pop Culture Personality Test -- VIDEO

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Ask Chris Colfer for his favorite villain in children’s entertainment, and he can’t help but pick the titular character from the second book in his The Land of Stories series, The Enchantress Returns: “I purposely tried to make her a little bit of all the classic villains,” he says of evil Ezmia, who resurfaces long after cursing Sleeping Beauty to strike fear in the fairy-tale world and beyond. “I say she’s deliciously evil.”

Also wicked: Colfer’s sense of humor when he recently stopped by EW to take our Pop Culture Personality Test. Watch the video below. READ FULL STORY

I'm still not over... The heartbreaking ending of 'Bridge to Terabithia'

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Here at EW, we’re reminiscing about the pop culture moments that we still can’t get over — no matter how much time has passed.

Fact #1: A great book you read as a kid will always affect you more deeply than a great book read at any other age.

Fact #2: Katherine Paterson’s Newbery Award-winning Bridge to Terabithia happens to be one of the greatest, saddest, most unforgettable children’s books ever written.

Fact #3: During a summer when Jeff Bridges’ long-in-the-works adaptation of The Giver actually seems to be gaining traction and theaters are finally showing a movie based on a Judy Blume book, it’s only natural to think about other kids’ classics that have made it to the big screen — bringing me back to Terabithia, which received its own overly CGI’d adaptation back in 2007. (The film starred baby Josh Hutcherson, pre-Hunger Games — check out his Bieber hair and chipmunk cheeks!)

All that is a long way of explaining why I found myself musing about Terabithia today — more specifically, about its ending, which has been responsible for more sobbing grade-schoolers than anything this side of Where the Red Fern Grows. (Spoiler alert: The red fern grows on top of dead dogs.) READ FULL STORY

'Jeopardy!' kills it with Stephen King-themed board -- PHOTO

It’s not quite as OMG-worthy as the game show’s recent homage to “Call Me Maybe” — but this board from tonight’s episode of Jeopardy!, inspired by legendary writer, longtime EW contributor, and — as a commenter points out — former Celebrity Jeopardy! victor Stephen King, is still pretty nifty. See the spooky sight below:

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This Week's Cover: The Best and Worst of 2012

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It’s not easy saying goodbye to 2012. Whether we were cheering at The Avengers, dancing Gangam style, or tracking the bad guys on Homeland, this was a wild year for entertainment — and we’ve captured all the excitement for posterity in EW’s 2012 Best & Worst issue, on stands now. Want to debate the year’s greatest hits? Our critics’ annual top ten lists spotlight all the best movies, TV, music, books, games, and stage, from the edgy genius of FX’s Louie to the sugar-rush high of Carly Rae Jepsen’s Call Me Maybe. We’ve also come up with our list of Great Performances, honoring the artists — Jessica Lange in American Horror Story, Javier Bardem in Skyfall, Jennifer Hudson remembering Whitney Houston at the Grammys  — who made 2012 so unforgettable. And we didn’t forget the jeers either: Our lists of 2012′s worst include clunkers like Christina Aguilera’s Lotus and Clint Eastwood’s Trouble with the Curve.

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iTunes reveals top-selling music, movies, TV, books, and apps of 2012

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Adele had a good year — again.

Though 21‘s American release came in February of 2011, the album’s sales were strong enough to put the soul singer at the top of iTunes’s album chart for a second straight year. The electronic entertainment store also reported strong showings for 2012′s usual suspects (The Hunger Games; “Call Me Maybe”) and a few less predictable picks — well done, Sherlock and Alcatraz. Here’s a rundown of what moved the most on iTunes this year:

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EW's Entertainers of the Year 2012: And the winners are...

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Two weeks ago, EW asked you to tell us who deserved to be on the list of 2012′s Entertainers of the Year. You responded by casting thousands of votes in 15 different poll categories — and now that our Entertainers of the Year issue is on newsstands, we can finally reveal your picks for favorite movie actor, biggest breakthrough entertainer, most entertaining tweeter, and much more.

Read on to learn who you picked as the year’s best — and who just missed the mark. Hint: Jennifer Lawrence better make some room in her virtual trophy case.

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EW Entertainers of the Year 2012: Vote for your favorites here!

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Best: Movies | TV | Music | Books | Breakthrough | Comeback | Tweeters | Sexiest | Best-Dressed

It’s that time of year again: EW has begun making lists and checking them twice, all to find out which stars will snag a spot as one of our Entertainers of the Year. And now it’s your turn to make your voice heard. Declare your favorites in movies, TV, music, books and more by voting in the polls below; the winners will appear in our annual special issue, which hits stands Nov. 30. But vote quickly — we’re closing the polls this Monday, Nov. 19 at 12 p.m. ET!

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Avast! Google Doodle celebrates Herman Melville and 'Moby Dick'

“Call me Google.”

The search giant has released a seaworthy new Doodle today in honor of the 161st anniversary of Moby Dick‘s publication. Herman Melville’s seminal novel was first published in Britain on October 18, 1851, though it didn’t exactly garner rave reviews until much later; contemporary critic Henry F. Chorley of the London Athenaeum called it an “absurd book” and named Melville among “the incorrigibles who occasionally tantalize us with indications of genius, while they constantly summon us to endure monstrosities, carelessnesses, and other such harassing manifestations of bad taste.”

But how do you really feel, Chorles?

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Adventures in Hollywood: How a movie option almost ruined my life

Lynn Messina wrote Fashionistas when she was working as a copy editor at InStyle magazine, and it became one of several popular books from 2003 that skewered the fashion industry and celebrity culture from the inside. The Devil Wears Prada was quickly adapted into a blockbuster movie. Fashionistas was not. This is her story.

I’m reasonably sure Charles Dickens wasn’t thinking of a movie option when he wrote about the interminable Chancery court case at the heart of Bleak House — mostly because film hadn’t been invented yet but also because he was a best seller and the works of best sellers often make a smooth transition from page to screen.

It was, however, the first thing I thought of while watching Masterpiece Theatre’s wonderful 2006 adaptation. In my experience, having one’s book optioned by a Hollywood producer bears a striking resemblance to the litigation of a generations-old lawsuit that ruins almost every life it touches: engulfment in a system so vast and arcane that only industry insiders understand how it works as it slogs through an expensive, ineffective, and technically difficult process that promises great wealth to those invested in an outcome so far removed from its origins that few can remember its source material.

Welcome to the High Court of the Chancery.

My book’s transition from page to screen was supposed to go smoothly. When Fashionistas was published in 2003, almost simultaneously as The Devil Wears Prada, Hollywood quickly came calling. Within months of a generous offer, it had everything it needed: studio backing, established screenwriters, and a star — and not just any star: Lindsay Lohan, bright-eyed and fresh from the success of Mean Girls. Reports of her involvement ricocheted around the world so quickly that it was my brother on a business trip to South Korea who broke the news to me. READ FULL STORY

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