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Tag: Best of 2011 - Behind the Scenes (1-10 of 24)

Best of 2012: The real-world feuds

Here’s a list of 2012’s most memorable ongoing conflicts from the real world. READ FULL STORY

Best of 2011 (Behind the Scenes): Director Chris Marrs Piliero explains why Ke$ha shot lasers at unicorns that bleed rainbows

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As 2011 comes to a close, EW.com wanted to honor some of the hardworking names and faces from behind the scenes for their outstanding achievements. Chris Marrs Piliero has directed music videos for the Black Keys, the Ready Set, and Yellow Card, in tones that vary wildly from romantic to satiric to eye-poppingly insane. Then he kicked off the 2011 music-video year by sending pop startlet Ke$ha into a cocktail party full of unicorns… and a surprise guest. Read on to find out how “Blow” came together. For more behind the scenes access to the year’s best TV and movie scenes, click here for EW.com‘s Best of 2011: Behind the Scenes coverage.

By: Chris Marrs Piliero

I’ve been told that I tend to incorporate violence in some form or fashion into my music videos. I didn’t realize this at first. Turns out, yup, I sure do. When dealing with violence in music videos it can be tricky… especially for a pop star. READ FULL STORY

Best of 2011 (Behind the Scenes): Alamo Drafthouse CEO-Cofounder Tim League on the infamous 'Don't Talk - Angry Voice Mail' PSA

As 2011 comes to a close, EW.com wanted to honor some of the hardworking names and faces from behind the scenes for their outstanding achievements. We asked Alamo Drafthouse CEO-cofounder Tim League to explain how the best movie theater in America — which has a strict no-talking policy dating back to 1997, and also prohibits patrons from texting — took the “Silence Is Golden” message to a whole new level. For more behind the scenes access to the year’s best TV and movie scenes, click here for EW.com‘s Best of 2011: Behind the Scenes coverage.

By: Tim League

One of the craziest moments of the year for us at Alamo was the launching and subsequent viral sharing of our “Don’t Talk – Angry Voice Mail” PSA.

The story began with our staff at the Alamo Drafthouse Village simply doing their job. The anonymous customer, despite what she tries to say in her voice mail, didn’t just use her phone to get to her seat. She was texting throughout the movie and was warned to stop or get kicked out. After being warned, she was rude and belligerent and then persisted with her texting. A manager was called and she was kicked out of the theater without a refund. READ FULL STORY

Best of 2011 (Behind the Scenes): 'Bossypants' cover photographer Ruven Afanador talks Tina Fey's man hands

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As 2011 comes to a close, EW.com wanted to honor some of the hardworking names and faces from behind the scenes for their outstanding achievements. One of the very best things about Tina Fey’s literary debut — the honest, gut-busting, don’t-read-it-on-the-subway funny best-seller Bossypants — aside from, of course, “A Mother’s Prayer for her Child” and all those wild 30 Rock anecdotes, was that outrageous man-hands cover. Renowned photographer Ruven Afanador recalls what it was like shooting the very funny image that clicked with readers. For more behind the scenes access to the year’s best TV and movie scenes, click here for EW.com‘s Best of 2011: Behind the Scenes coverage.

As told by: Ruven Afandor

We were doing the cover of the book and Tina had mentioned to me certain things that she liked, and while we were brainstorming, I told her this idea that she might like. I’ve always been fascinated with the [passe-têtes at the] carnival, where you stick your head in front of the thing and then you see a whole body. READ FULL STORY

Best of 2011 (Behind the Scenes): 'Archer' creator Adam Reed talks about the cancer rampage episode

Archer

As 2011 comes to a close, EW.com wanted to honor some of the hardworking names and faces from behind the scenes for their outstanding achievements. The absurdist FX espionage comedy Archer has always bravely plumbed the depths of hilarious depravity, but the season 2 episode “Placebo Effect” was a bad-taste masterpiece. Titular superspy Sterling Archer is suffering from breast cancer, and discovers that his anti-cancer drugs are actually placebos cooked up by the Irish mob as a money-making scheme. This initiates an episode-long bloodsoaked vengeance rampage. Archer plays a grisly game of Family Feud (the penalty for not telling him what he wants to know: A shot to the kneecap.) He stuffs a grenade up a man’s rear end. The whole time, he’s vomiting from chemotherapy nausea and smoking relentless amounts of medical marijuana. And then the whole thing ends with an extended reference to Magnum, P.I. Creator Adam Reed talks about what inspired this grisly, offensive, utterly wonderful half-hour of television. For more behind the scenes access to the year’s best TV and movie scenes, click here for EW.com’s Best of 2011: Behind the Scenes coverage.

As told by: Adam Reed

Every year, it seems like they catch some pharmacist or some doctor who’s been giving people placebos for their cancer. The first time I heard about it, I was furious. Then I heard about it again a few years later, and was even more furious. READ FULL STORY

Best of 2011 (Behind the Scenes): 'Breaking Bad' creator Vince Gilligan talks about That Scene from the season finale

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As 2011 comes to a close, EW.com wanted to honor some of the hardworking names and faces from behind the scenes for their outstanding achievements. Over the course of 13 thrillingly tense episodes, the fourth season of Breaking Bad gradually built up to the final reckoning between teacher-turned-criminal Walter White and druglord demi-god Gustavo Fring. Vince Gilligan is the creator and showrunner of Breaking Bad. He also wrote and directed the season finale, which featured one of the great horrifying images in TV history. Here, Gilligan describes that scene’s long journey from his brain onto your television. Needless to say, there are spoilers — but come on, how have you not seen it yet? For more behind the scenes access to the year’s best TV and movie scenes, click here for EW.com‘s Best of 2011: Behind the Scenes coverage.

As told by: Vince Gilligan

Gus is a man who had one Achilles Heel, as far as we know: His burning desire for vengeance against the people who killed Max, who was very important to him. We don’t tend to nail things down on Breaking Bad. It’s fun to be a little mysterious, and it’s nice to have the audience come up with backstories on their own. Having said that, I personally think Max was more than just a friend to Gus. I think they probably were lovers. And therefore it was understandably a very crushing, terrible loss for Gus, one that he would never forget. That one bit of emotion that he allowed himself ultimately proved to be his undoing. READ FULL STORY

Best of 2011 (Behind the Scenes): 'Sons of Anarchy' music supervisor Bob Thiele Jr. on season 4's greatest hits

As 2011 comes to a close, EW.com wanted to honor some of the hardworking names and faces from behind the scenes for their outstanding achievements. We asked Sons of Anarchy music supervisor Bob Thiele Jr. to name five tunes from season 4 that represent the show’s best use of music — which in our minds, is also some of TV’s finest. For more behind the scenes access to the year’s best TV and movie scenes, click here for EW.com‘s Best of 2011: Behind the Scenes coverage.

By: Bob Thiele Jr.

“Coal War” by Joshua James: I introduced the music of Joshua James to [Sons of Anarchy creator Kurt Sutter] at the beginning of season 3. We were looking for an artist to sing “No Milk Today” (season 3 opening montage) and I thought JJ ideal. READ FULL STORY

Best of 2011 (Behind the Scenes): Nolan North (a.k.a. Nathan Drake) talks about getting lost in the desert in 'Uncharted 3'

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As 2011 comes to a close, EW.com wanted to honor some of the hardworking names and faces from behind the scenes for their outstanding achievements. The essence of the videogame medium is action: running, jumping, shooting, dodging, flying. That’s especially true of the Uncharted series, a franchise which has made its name by offering better-than-Hollywood thrills. But November’s Uncharted 3: Drake’s Deception took an intriguing turn when — following a fantastical plane-crash set piece — series protagonist Nathan Drake got lost in the desert. No guns, no exciting settings, no enemy except thirst: The player had to guide Drake through an apparently empty landscape, wandering and wandering and wandering. Nolan North — one of the hardest-working voice-over talents in the videogame industry — has played Nathan Drake via an intensive motion-capture process since the series began. Read on to find out how he helped to make something out of literal nothingness. For more behind the scenes access to the year’s best TV and movie scenes, click here for EW.com‘s Best of 2011: Behind the Scenes coverage.

As told by: Nolan North

Lost in the desert! People loved that level! They felt isolated. They didn’t know what to do, or which way to go. The same way that Nathan Drake is feeling. I think that Uncharted 3, more than the earlier games, you got to experience not only what Drake was doing, but what he was feeling. READ FULL STORY

Best of 2011 (Behind the Scenes): Costume designer Ngila Dickson on the spandex wonder that was 'Green Lantern'

As 2011 comes to a close, EW.com wanted to honor some of the hardworking names and faces from behind the scenes for their outstanding achievements. Hired to design costumes for Green Lantern, one of 2011′s most anticipated blockbusters, Oscar winner Ngila Dickson (The Lord of the Rings: Return of the King) found herself in an interesting position. She had to abandon age-old techniques and design Ryan Reynolds’ pivotal superhero suit entirely in CGI. Read on to see how Dickson rose to the challenge. For more behind the scenes access to the year’s best TV and movie scenes, click here for EW.com‘s Best of 2011: Behind the Scenes coverage.

As told by: Ngila Dickson

Originally, [Reynolds' costume] was going to be built [the old-fashioned way]. Then it was decided that the costume should be done CGI. As a costume designer, somebody used to building things, that was quite a challenge. We were just trying to find a new way into the idea of a superhero. There was a part in the script when the Hal Jordan goes to the planet Ryut and his body was inspected. I thought, “What about a costume that comes from the body inside out?” It was [inspired by this idea of] bringing the life force to the outside of his body.

At that point, I really decided to understand how you would build something like that in 3-D. My first encounter was with Lord of the Rings, working with Weta [Digital (co-founded by Peter Jackson)], working out movement for cloaks and pieces like that. Of course I was incredibly aware of it and what the possibilities were, and also very conscious of where the film is branching into real film, real build, and now this very strong visual effects world. I was incredibly curious about my role as a costume designer in that.

I worked with some great illustrators, and we were literally doing like what you would sculpt in a studio, but we were doing it with a computer. In many respects, we were following all the same principals, but you never got the tangible result that you get from the build you do in a costume house. I found that whole process very exciting, and I feel like I’m not done with it yet.

It’s the first time I’ve taken it to that level. I love doing those big films. I love how complicated they are. More recently, I just finished Mr. Pip, an independent film directed by Andrew Adamson [The Chronicles of Narnia] in Bougainville, Papua New Guinea. I wanted to go back to doing a small movie, to remind myself about the build. Some costume designers have a genre, I want to be incredibly open. You’re going to bring something from one of those areas to the table and hopefully give it a different view.

For more on the Best and Worst of 2011, pick up Entertainment Weekly’s new issue, on stands now.

Best of 2011 (Behind the Scenes): Stunt Coordinator Jack Gill explains the 'Fast Five' bank vault finale

As 2011 comes to a close, EW.com wanted to honor some of the hardworking names and faces from behind the scenes for their outstanding achievements. Stunt Coordinator Jack Gill is a veteran of the stunt trade. (One of his earliest gigs was stunt driving on The Dukes of Hazzard.) His skills were pushed to the limit for the climactic sequence in Fast Five, in which our heroes attach a pair of Dodge Chargers to a massive bank vault and drive said bank vault all around Rio De Janeiro while being chased by every police car on the continent. Learn all about the intricacies of managing a devastatingly destructive bank vault!

As told by: Jack Gill

When we first started on Fast Five, our director, Justin Lin, came in and said, “Look, I’ve done a couple of other Fast & Furiouses. The kids have all gotten very savvy to what is digital and what is real. I lose my audience the second they see something that they know in their mind is not real. What I want you guys to strive to do is to give me as much real as you can give me. If I have to change the script so that you can do it real, let’s do that.” READ FULL STORY

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