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Tag: Advertising (11-20 of 554)

Bryan Cranston narrates new iPad Air commercial -- VIDEO

After watching the newly released iPad Air commercial, you may find yourself wondering why you feel so calm, so full of life, hopeful for the future — but also, with a slight edge of terror. Well, that’s because the crisp, clean TV spot is narrated by all-around wonderful human Bryan Cranston, who most famously also portrays all-around terrifying character Walter White from Breaking Bad.
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Peyton and Eli Manning score with DirecTV rap -- VIDEO

F.O.Y.P.

This is the last moment in your life that you don’t know what F.O.Y.P. stands for. Once you see Peyton and Eli Manning’s new commercial for DirecTV’s NFL Sunday Ticket Max, the F.O.Y.P. rap will be stuck in your head whether you like it or not. From a music standpoint, that’s a nuisance — like a pool-water-in-your-ear-level nuisance — but the Brothers Manning, who’ve both hosted Saturday Night Live, throw themselves into the boy-band roles. It’s not just the spray tan and atrocious wigs, folks — it’s the attitude.  Watch them rap about the best place to watch football. READ FULL STORY

Twister (board game, not 'nado): A pop culture timeline

Charles Foley, inventor of the board game Twister, died yesterday at 82. May he rest in peace in whichever socially awkward color-coded contortion was his favorite.

I always thought Twister was the greatest board game ever invented — in theory, anyway. In execution, I think I was playing it wrong. I have distinct memories of ending up with my face smushed onto my uncle’s stomach and my other little cousins’ bare toes (THEY were doing it wrong) wriggling under my butt as I tried not to fall. I almost always surrendered out of embarrassment. What I really needed to do was grow up, work out, and play with sexy peers so my strategy could become less “Avoid the body hair of relatives” and more “Whoops! I fell down and touched your whole body.” I can still do it! Twister is timeless and shall never be forgotten.

Below, a brief timeline of the button-candy board game in pop culture:
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'Pacific Rim': Are those celebrity tweets helping?

To combat early reports that Guillermo de Toro’s Pacific Rim was tracking poorly — meaning its blockbuster status could be challenged at the box office come July 12 — the marketing folks are making sure moviegoers know it’s more than a human-controlled robot vs. monster movie. And in addition to featurettes and TV spots, they’re using celebrities’ Twitter feeds to get out that message.

On the one hand, it’s brilliant: People who won’t take the time to press play and view a clip online might take two seconds to read a tweet and then be open to watching an ad on TV that they’d otherwise have fast-forwarded. It’s far-reaching with little effort: Get the celeb to an early screening, then have him or her (okay, usually him) share his opinion as someone who’s actually seen it.

On the other hand, when the tweets start piling up, the mechanics of it are as overt as product placement within a movie, and we know those highly orchestrated, succinct endorsements can be grating. Is that portion of the marketing plan working? Poll below!
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David Hasselhoff peddles iced 'hoffee' (and channels David Brent?)

David-Hasselhoff-Thirsty-for-Love.jpg

David Hasselhoff has a new music video that you’ll want to watch below. The song, “Thirsty for Love,” is an ad for the New England-based convenience store chain Cumberland Farms, which also used the Hoff in a campaign last summer, and its iced coffee. (Make that “Iced Hoffee,” as Ad Age notes.) Is it just us, or does the Hoff’s wardrobe look familiar?

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Funny or Die: Adam DeVine promotes shaving (and humor!) in new webseries

Writer-actor-comic Adam DeVine is already at work prepping the next seasons of Comedy Central’s Workaholics. The network has ordered his other series, Adam DeVine’s House Party for the fall, and he cameod in Arrested Development. Between all of that, DeVine found time to do a web series… selling Norelco shavers?

That’s right: The company approached the actor with a pitch, he says: They’d partner with DeVine and Funny or Die for a series of “funny little videos” about the highs and lows of body hair. DeVine said yes — giving us “Special Unit’s Unit” earlier this month, with two more videos to follow.

The newest one is called “Dude House.” DeVine plays a dude. Shaving (and humor!) is involved. Watch the video, and read our chat with the actor about the ins and outs of his Norelco partnership, below.

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Mariah Carey Dreams: Best perfume press release ever?

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Celebrity perfume press releases are traditionally the most flowery in all of entertainment. They have to be. But the announcement of Mariah Carey’s new scent, Mariah Carey Dreams, available exclusively at Kohl’s in April and on Kohls.com today, truly outdoes itself. An excerpt: READ FULL STORY

Grey Poupon to bring back classic campaign: Pardon me, would you have any nostalgia?

Those who appreciate the finer things in life are generally against the idea of sequels; they’re so crass, so money-grubbing, so… déclassé, unless you’re talking about the Ring Cycle. But snobs and slobs alike should be delighted to hear that Grey Poupon, the label that single-jar-edly made it okay for America to move beyond French’s yellow mustard, is bringing back its iconic “Pardon Me” ad campaign for one night only.

Anyone who watched television in the ’80s or ’90s will remember the campaign’s general conceit: A fancy-looking man drives through a quaint country scene in a chauffeured car when another expensive automobile pulls up alongside him. The back window rolls down to reveal a similarly fancy-looking man, who asks, “Pardon me, would you have any Grey Poupon?”

“But of course,” the first man replies, handing over a jar of dijon mustard. The tagline: “One of life’s finer pleasures.”

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Leonardo DiCaprio and the easy money of foreign commercials

“I’m trying to make movies in my life … that last longer than opening weekend. That’s it, that’s my whole goal. I don’t have to make money; I do films for scale and then, you know, I go do coffee commercials overseas, and I make a lot of money so I get to live in a nice house. … And I don’t give a sh-t. And people will go, ‘Oh that’s a sellout.’ And you know what? F–k you.” — George Clooney, 2012

Clooney wasn’t at his most eloquent as he justified starring in Italian coffee commercials during a Newsweek pre-Oscar roundtable last year, but his blunt assessment captures the bottom-line truth that lures many Hollywood celebrities. Look at Leonardo DiCaprio, whose Japanese commercial for Jim Beam recently popped up on the internet and instantly raised eyebrows. Why is Leonardo DiCaprio, arguably the most famous Hollywood celebrity in the world, making commercials?

In the United States, when a famous actor appears in a commercial, there are fears that it can undermine, or at least cheapen, his celebrity. (For example, what was your reaction when Adrien Brody pitched Stella Artois during the 2011 Super Bowl? “Smooth!” or, “Oof, did he already pawn his Oscar?”) American celebs are more willing to provide their voices to a commercial than their faces, and when they do lend their fame to a product in faraway places like Japan or Italy, they often have contractual reassurances that evidence of the corporate relationship never makes it back to the States. (To which the Internet says, “Haaaaa-ha!”)

So why do they do it? Duh, money. Lots of it, as Clooney admitted. ”I couldn’t believe the money they were paying me,” the late Dennis Hopper once told EW, after popping up in an unusual TV commercial for Japanese bath products. ”If I could do one of these every year, I could retire.”

Dennis Hopper? Playing in the bath with a rubber ducky? Yes, that really happened — and David Lynch was not involved. But don’t look down your nose at him or the other celebs who’ve turned two days of work in Tokyo into a bucolic vacation home in the south of France. Celebs have sold their fame in foreign commercials — typically in Asian markets — for decades. Orson Welles and Sean Connery were peddling Japanese whiskey long before Bill Murray’s fading movie star in Lost in Translation went East for a quick payday. It makes you wonder what a beloved Hollywood icon like Paul Newman would have said about all this trading on fame. Fortunately, back in 1980, he addressed the issue directly. Click below for Newman’s refreshing take, and then peruse some of Hollywood’s biggest celebrities starring in foreign commercials. (Quick! Before their legal minions force their removal from the web!) READ FULL STORY

Leonardo DiCaprio is selling booze to the Japanese -- VIDEO

Anyone who thinks the Bill-Murray-sells-whiskey scenes in Lost in Translation were comic exaggerations hasn’t seen Leonardo DiCaprio’s new campaign for Jim Beam in Japan.

On the one hand, the new ads — which have leaked around the web — are totally innocuous (no rat pack references). But on the other, well, they do feature Leo looking very intently at a ball of ice. And then he makes it explode with his fingers!

Reps for Jim Beam said the campaign wouldn’t air in the U.S., so you have two options if you want to recreate the DiCaprio Drinking Experience: scour the internet for more fleeting glimpses of him drinking his “cool bourbon” or fly to Japan. We hear the ice there explodes!

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