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Category: Movies (1-10 of 7625)

Al Pacino names an 8th-grade teacher, Marlon Brando among his acting influences

To promote their new movie The Humbling, actor Al Pacino and director Barry Levinson stopped by EW‘s Sirius radio station and talked with EW editor Matt Bean about the people that inspired their long careers in film.

Levinson recalled the moment that he decided to become a filmmaker: laying in the hospital as a child, he asked a nurse to change the channel and the nurse challenged him, “Oh, you think you can do better?” Levinson, who produced shows like Oz and Homicide: Life on the Street, said he never forgot that moment. READ FULL STORY

Nominated For Nothing: 'Obvious Child'

Obvious-Child.jpg

Just about every year, brilliant movies are utterly ignored by the Oscars. The Searchers, Groundhog Day, Breathless, King Kong, Casino Royale, Touch of Evil, Caddyshack, Mean Streets, The Big Lebowski, Blackfish — the Academy has a long history of overlooking comedies, action movies, horror flicks, hard-boiled genre pics, artsy foreign films, and documentaries that aren’t about World War II. Before the ceremony, we’ll be taking a closer look at films that were too small, too weird, or perhaps simply too awesome for the Academy Awards. These are the Non-Nominees.

The film: The feature-length debut for director Gillian Robespierre, based on her 2009 short film of the same name, Obvious Child follows struggling twentysomething comedian Donna (Jenny Slate) living in the flannel-and-irony-drenched Williamsburg. After getting “dumped up with” and having a bona fide breakdown, Donna drunkenly hooks up with the clean-shaven, so-not-her-type Max (Jake Lacy). Fast forward a few weeks, and she finds out—whoops—she’s pregnant. She decides to have an abortion—and follows through with her decision. And (spoiler!), instead of it ruining her life, everything turns out kind of all right. READ FULL STORY

SAG Awards 2015: We live-blogged it

The SAG Awards annually serve as a predictor of Oscar success: Matthew McConaughey, Cate Blanchett, Lupita Nyong’o, and Jared Leto all won SAG Awards last year and went on to win Oscars just weeks later. This year’s ceremony aired Sunday evening, giving movie fans plenty of excitement—plus a good idea of who might win big at the upcoming Academy Awards.

But the winners list isn’t the only memorable part of the SAG Awards: This year’s show was full of noteworthy—sometimes funny, sometimes sentimental—moments, including Reese Witherspoon’s graceful reaction to a technical glitch and Viola Davis’ emotional, empowering acceptance speech. Check out the live-blog below for more on the night’s best parts, and see here for the complete list of winners.
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'The Lego Movie,' 'Birdman' nab Producers Guild of America Awards

The Lego Movie might have been overlooked by the Academy Awards, but it didn’t get the same treatment from the Producers Guild of America: The film won the award for best animated feature at Saturday’s Producers Guild of America Awards.

The PGA Awards annually honor achievements in film, television, and digital production. Other winners include the Oscar-nominated Birdman and Jerry Seinfeld’s Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee. See the full list below:
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Five directors who can help Johnny Depp recover from 'Mortdecai'

The saddest part of Mortdecai‘s abysmal debut this weekend was how expected it seemed to be. Johnny Depp’s latest starring vehicle, in which he plays a daffy British bon-vivant jetting around the world to find a stolen masterpiece, aimed to be a kind of Pink Panther-esque caper—but American audiences stayed away in droves, and the critics unloaded. “In the end, we must lay the badness of Mortdecai at the feet of its star,” wrote New York‘s David Edelstein. “I envy Depp’s capacity for self-amusement, but it’s a pity he’s so rich and enbubbled that no one dares say to say to him, ‘Er, Johnny… this is, er, really very bad.'”

Mortdecai is expected to barely crack $4 million this weekend, making it Depp’s worst wide debut since 1999’s The Astronaut’s Wife. But most everyone saw this debacle coming: the comedy opened in less than 2,700 theaters—indicating a startling amount of indifference from the exhibitors towards a major Hollywood superstar—and many of the nation’s leading film critics couldn’t be bothered to review it. (Those who did chime in pilloried the film with a 12 percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes.) Though Depp currently has a hit in theaters, with a supporting role as the Wolf in Into the Woods, Mortdecai is his fifth consecutive stinker as the film’s star, following in the wake of Transcendence, The Lone Ranger, Dark Shadows, and The Rum Diary.

His last real blockbuster was the fourth Pirates of the Caribbean film, On Stranger Tides, cashing in again as Capt. Jack Sparrow. Recall that Depp spent the bulk of his 30s thrashing against Hollywood’s square-peg efforts to make him the billon-dollar star he looked like on the poster, and that it eventually happened only after his cockeyed portrayal of Sparrow.

Capt. Jack is a delightfully ironic gag that pleased him to no end. But Depp used the success of the Pirates franchise as an endorsement of a tic—the “aria of weirdness” that requires him to hide behind characters rather than disappear into them. Since Capt. Jack gave him carte blanche, there’s been Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Sweeney Todd, Alice in Wonderland, Dark Shadows, The Lone Ranger, Transcendence, Into the Woods, and now, Mortdecai. Some of these characters were pretty fabulous concoctions, but together, they mask something else: For an actor who can literally make any movie he chooses, Depp has fallen into the type of creative rut that would’ve made 1995 Johnny Depp roll his eyes. READ FULL STORY

Who could Chiwetel Ejiofor play in 'Doctor Strange'?

According to The Hollywood Reporter, Oscar nominee Chiwetel Ejiofor is the latest highly-respected actor to be pursued by a movie studio for a role in a superhero film—that film being Marvel’s Doctor Strange. If the report is true—and even if it is, the deal is supposedly in its earliest stages—it would certainly raise the film’s profile significantly. Which is a good thing when your subject matter is as abstract and weird as Doctor Strange. (Neither Marvel nor Ejiofor has yet responded to EW’s request for comment.)

But who would Ejiofor play in the film?

Speculation abounds—especially since THR called the Strange role a leading one, then offered three possible suggestions: villain Baron Mordo, Strange’s mentor The Ancient One, or Strange’s assistant Wong. Meanwhile, Bleeding Cool points out that comics speculators seem to believe Ejiofor would play Brother Voodoo, another mystic hero in the Marvel Universe who goes on to briefly replace Stephen Strange as Earth’s Sorcerer Supreme.

Let’s break these down, one at a time:

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Nominated for Nothing: 'Snowpiercer'

snowpiercer

Just about every year, brilliant movies are utterly ignored by the Oscars. The Searchers, Groundhog Day, Breathless, King Kong, Casino Royale, Touch of Evil, Caddyshack, Mean Streets, The Big Lebowski, Blackfish — the Academy has a long history of overlooking comedies, action movies, horror flicks, hard-boiled genre pics, artsy foreign films, and documentaries that aren’t about World War II. Before the ceremony, we’ll be taking a closer look at films that were too small, too weird, or perhaps simply too awesome for the Academy Awards. These are the Non-Nominees.

The film: Bong Joon-ho’s Snowpiercer is the story of mankind’s devolution after a plan to counteract global warming backfires, transforming the entire planet into a deadly Arctic tundra. Before all was lost, a billionaire named Wilfred built a behemoth of a train to save the remainders of humanity—and quite literally compartmentalize them by class. The suffering 99 percent is held like cattle in the back of the train—nearly starved, worked to the bone, completely dehumanized, and told to shut up and be grateful, or pay dearly for their insubordination. Meanwhile, the elite one percent luxuriate in their vast front-of-the-train libraries, gourmet sushi restaurants, and plush jazz bars.

Curtis (Chris Evans) and company, with nothing to lose after 17 years of oppression, are sparked by acts of cruelty to revolt by attempting to make their way to the train’s engine. The film’s all-star cast also features Tilda Swinton, John Hurt, Jamie Bell, Octavia Spencer, Ed Harris, Ewen Bremner and South Korean star Kang-ho Song. READ FULL STORY

PopWatch Confessional: Your most embarrassing celebrity encounter

The perks of writing about entertainment are numerous: early movie screenings, awards show invitations, getting the chance to interview and rub elbows with artists whose work you truly admire. Of course, there are also a few pitfalls to this profession—particularly when it comes to to that last perk. Cue this week’s PopWatch Confessional question: What’s the most embarrassing encounter you’ve ever had with a celebrity? (We’re counting both encounters that happened in a professional context and chance meetings.)

Tina Jordan, senior editor: I dropped my overstuffed bag in Michael Caine‘s living room at the St. Regis: Pens, lipstick, various snacks, a few magazines, keys, bobby pins, notebooks, band-aids, business cards and the all like rained down on the antique Oriental carpet. I mean, there was a lot of crap. I was about eight months pregnant, so poor Michael Caine—who was very nice—had to get down on his hands and knees for about ten minutes to pick up all my stuff. I was so flustered I almost couldn’t get my tape recorder to work. READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly: American Snipers

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The best movie ever made about an American sniper is a British film directed by a Spanish guy. 28 Weeks Later came out eight years ago and hasn’t aged a day. It’s technically a sequel to 28 Days Later, the movie that transformed the zombie apocalypse genre into the pre-eminent post-9/11 pop culture myth. READ FULL STORY

Join EW's Facebook Q&A with Patrick Stewart

The mutant leader himself will be coming to EW‘s Facebook page on Friday morning. Starting at 11:30 a.m. ET, Patrick Stewart will be fielding questions posted on our Facebook page ahead of the release of his new movie Match. Now’s your chance to ask him why he isn’t coming back for the next X-Men movie, or find out what it’s like hanging out with Ian McKellen.

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