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Category: Movies (1-10 of 7404)

'Snowpiercer,' 'The One I Love,' 'Nebraska,' more arrive on Netflix in November

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New movies, television seasons, and comedy specials arriving on Netflix in November have been announced.

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This week's cover: First look at 'Terminator: Genisys'

The Terminator is having a bad day. It’s a muggy July afternoon in New Orleans—the temperature is loitering in the triple digits—and Arnold Schwarzenegger is inside a giant warehouse on the grounds of NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility. Suited up in a black leather jacket with green-painted latex obscuring most of the right side of his face, he is again playing the indelible robot that solidified his place in Hollywood some 30 years ago. So far today the former governor of California has been stepped on and forced to crawl on the ground, and now, as he gasps for breath fighting his opponent, he’s about to get transported to a different time—which, if you know anything about Terminator mythology, is a very bad thing. Especially if your metal endoskeleton is showing.

The beginning of Terminator: Genisys, the first of three planned films that Paramount hopes will relaunch the beloved sci-fi franchise, is set in 2029, when the Future War is raging and a group of human rebels has the evil artificial-intelligence system Skynet on the ropes. John Connor (Dawn of the Planet of the Apes’ Jason Clarke) is the leader of the resistance, and Kyle Reese (Divergent‘s Jai Courtney) is his loyal soldier, raised in the ruins of post apocalyptic California. As in the original film, Connor sends Reese back to 1984 to save Connor’s mother, Sarah (Game of Thrones‘ Emilia Clarke), from a Terminator programmed to kill her so that she won’t ever give birth to John. But what Reese finds on the other side is nothing like he expected. READ FULL STORY

Daniel Radcliffe raps 'Alphabet Aerobics' on 'Tonight Show'

Daniel Radcliffe knows the alphabet—and performed a complicated rap song on Tuesday to prove it.

The Horns star went on The Tonight Show Tuesday evening and revealed that he’s always had an “obsession” with memorizing tricky rap songs, including Blackalicious’ “Alphabet Aerobics.” So, of course, Jimmy Fallon made him show off his skills.
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12 thoughts about Marvel's big announcement

1. Nothing actually happened today. The Internet goes crazy for announcements, and today might very well go down in history as the single most announcement-y announcement in the history of superhero movies or movies or pop culture or human history. But an announcement is not a movie. Anticipation is another word for enjoying something that doesn’t exist yet. Currently, here on the Internet, there are bizarre people hurling insult grenades at critics who have committed the sin of liking but not loving Interstellar—a movie that none of the bizarre people hurling insult grenades have actually seen. Maybe they will never actually see Interstellar. Anticipation, when it builds up for months or years, can blind you. That is not a culture that loves watching movies; that is a culture that loves looking forward to movies. The Superhero Movie era is an era of announcements. We’re all just unpaid publicists now. The system is in place now; it can’t change. Forget it, Jake, it’s Comic-Con. READ FULL STORY

Here's how a 'Star Wars' laser pistol would work in real life

Every Star Wars fan at one time or another has probably made the infamous noise of the franchise’s firearms. But scientists in Poland are trying to find out what one of those lasers would actually look and act like.

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Entertainment Geekly Mailbag: Batman vs. Superman vs. Captain America vs. Iron Man

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Two weeks ago, in the span of about 24 hours, the universe of superhero movies rapidly expanded in a series of bizarre new directions. First came news that Marvel was actively considering making the next Captain America movie into the next Iron Man movie, in a story arc that would cull material from the mid-2000s mega-crossover “Civil War.”

Coincidentally or probably not, Warner Bros. chose that precise cultural moment to announce that they were planning a whole bunch of DC superhero movies. Wonder Woman? Aquaman? Cyborg? Check, check, checkeroo! Several readers wrote in with their own thoughts on the Marvel and DC Cinematic Universes. (You should, too! Remember, if you want to yell at me for something, my email address is darren_franich@ew.com.)

Let’s start thing off with Captiron Manmerica: READ FULL STORY

London hotel lets you stay in Hogwarts for $400/night

Still waiting for an owl from Hogwarts? Well, a London hotel is now offering the next best thing to actually sleeping in Gryffindor tower, but it’ll cost you about $400.

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13 'Pride and Prejudice'-inspired movies, books, TV shows and more, ranked

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It’s a truth universally acknowledged that a person in want of a good project will adapt Pride and Prejudice–if not always to dazzling effect. The latest take, a two-part miniseries called Death Comes to Pemberley, premiered yesterday on PBS. And if there’s anything P&P fans like almost as much as Austen’s book, it’s consuming and then critiquing the various interpretations of it. Which is why we’re taking this opportunity to rank 13 different iterations of Pride & Prejudice, from the best (the 1995 miniseries starring Colin Firth is a nigh-untouchable high point) to the significantly less great.

1. Pride and Prejudice (miniseries): The 6-hour 1995 BBC version is the gold standard for faithful adaptation. Colin Firth’s haughty, smoldering Darcy is the platonic ideal of the character, playing beautifully off of Jennifer Ehle’s wry, mature Lizzy Bennet. Plus, the miniseries’ runtime means every nuance of Austen’s work (and her quippy dialogue) is represented—while allowing for some creative liberties, like Firth’s Darcy taking a bath, or a dip in a pond that leads to him striding about manfully in a wet white shirt. READ FULL STORY

Zoe Saldana on her hero, 'strong female characters,' and playing real women (and aliens)

Zoe Saldana knows how to play ass-kicking, universe-saving, unusually colorful heroes like Gamora in Guardians of the Galaxy, Neytiri in Avatar, and Uhura in Star Trek. But for her new AOL web series, Saldana turned the camera on everyday people who play the role of the hero.

In My Hero, which debuted yesterday, Saldana and some of her fellow celebrities—including Julianne Hough, Nick Cannon and Maria Menounos—pay tribute to the people they cherish via short, touching vignettes. “People are generally very grateful to the people around them that keep them together, that supported them, that encouraged them to become what they are as artists,” the actress says. “So we thought, what a great opportunity to do a show about this and send a very positive message out there. Because I find it hard to believe that anybody makes it on their own. There’s always somebody that helped you in some way.”

In the interview below, Saldana tells EW about how her hero (spoiler: it’s her mom) inspired her to make a habit of playing rather… ethereal characters. The actress also talks about balancing the upcoming sequels to her three big franchises with motherhood (she’s pregnant with twins!), why movies need more real women—not strong ones—and why we should stop saying the word “ethnic.” READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly: How 'The Walking Dead' is 'Lord of the Rings'

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Robert Kirkman likes to describe The Walking Dead as a zombie movie that never ends. But to my eyes, the most interesting thing about the show is how it’s spent five seasons fluttering between different storytelling modes. The show lacks a single setting and makes a point of killing off at least a couple key cast members every season. This can make The Walking Dead feel unwieldy or unfocused, but it also means that there’s an exciting state of constant flux underpinning the show’s basic head-crushing thrills. I’ve always said that original showrunner Frank Darabont most clearly viewed his version of The Walking Dead as a kind of neo-western, with Sheriff Rick as a clean-cut cowboy wanderer set morally adrift in a new frontier apocalypse. READ FULL STORY

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