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Category: Books (51-60 of 469)

'Allegiant' will be two films? Why this decision might hurt Veronica Roth's work

There will be four movies for Four.

It was announced Friday morning that the final book in the Divergent trilogy, Allegiant, will be split into two films, coming out a year apart, bringing the franchise to four films total. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows kicked off this trend — successfully — which means that now everyone feels free to turn their film installments into two projects (Twilight did it, and Hunger Games will do it as well). My colleague Darren Franich already wrote about why this is a trend that needs to die — and I wholeheartedly agree. But for Divergent/Allegiant specifically, I’m quite curious exactly how the studio plans to make two films — and how they plan to make sure that decision won’t ultimately hurt Veronica Roth’s work.

[Spoilers for Allegiant follow] READ FULL STORY

PopWatch Planner: 'Game of Thrones' returns, along with MTV's 'The Challenge' and more

I can win over most of you with five words about this week: Game of Thrones is back. But if that’s not enough for you, we’ve also got a new Bill Murray film in theaters, a funny new read, and the start of the 25th season of MTV’s The Challenge. Let’s just say you’ve got a diverse and very interesting week of pop culture ahead of you. Here’s what your schedule looks like this week:

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'Paper Towns' and Everyday YA: Please adapt these teen tales into films too!

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John Green fans must have felt as though they’d stumbled into the literal heart of Jesus on Monday with news that the author’s 2008 novel Paper Towns would also be adapted into a feature film, with The Fault in Our Stars actor Nat Wolff cast in the lead. The announcement isn’t just a boon for Nerdfighters everywhere, but also for fans of what, for our purposes, I’ll call Everyday YA: teen narratives in which nary a magic wand, sparkling vampire, or deadly arena (save for the high school hallway, of course) are to be found. And this latest option may just be the start.

When my colleague Nicole Sperling spoke with movie producers in the wake of Divergent‘s boffo box office, they hinted that the trend in young-adult filmmaking may very well be these types of tales — “less action-oriented and more intimate,” as Sperling summarized it. So if the tide is indeed turning toward the sort of characters who would have populated your 15th birthday party, noshing on Doritos and paging through YM magazines (RIP!), where should moviemakers mine for source material? I’ve got three suggestions for Everyday YA perfectly suited for celluloid: READ FULL STORY

A deep dive into 'The Giver' trailer ('sup, Taylor Swift?)

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Releasing a film adaptation of The Giver in 2014 was always going to be tricky.

Why? Because Lois Lowry’s kid-lit classic, first published in 1993, helped to invent the tropes of dystopian young adult fiction. (Even though, as its Newbery Medal would attest, it’s actually meant for middle-grade readers; yes, young adult and middle-grade are different.)  The Hunger Games, Divergent, Delirium, Matched, The Maze Runner — they’re all indebted to Lowry, even if each of those later books is less lyrical and more literal than Lowry’s original.

But now that there’s a glut of dystopian YA fiction — both on bookshelves and at multiplexes — a film version of The Giver runs the risk of seeming both generic and derivative… even though its story was written long before Katniss was even a twinkle in Suzanne Collins’s eye. Thankfully, a faithful adaptation of Lowry’s story would help to curb those accusations, since the book is really pretty different from the works it inspired: The Giver has no real action sequences. Its main character is a thoughtful 12-year-old boy, not a brooding, badass teenage warrior. The entire narrative takes place in fewer than 200 pages — a far cry from the increasingly bloated tomes being churned out by present-day YA authors.

The Weinstein Company’s new Giver movie is… not that faithful adaptation. How do we know? Because of the film’s first trailer:

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PopWatch Planner: 'Divergent' hits theaters, 'Dancing With the Stars' returns, 'Pretty Little Liars' ends, and more

This week has a little bit of everything, from a big blockbuster hitting theaters to a new album perfect for your party playlist — not to mention a handful of television premieres and finales. For Pretty Little Liars fans, another season is coming to an end, while Drop Dead Diva viewers are gearing up for the show’s last run of episodes. So if you’re seeking a break from all things March Madness, look no further than our planner. You’re welcome.

SUNDAY 3/16

Crisis, 10 p.m., NBC

In the middle of a field trip, a school bus — one that’s carrying the children of some of the nation’s most powerful people — is taken hostage. How far will they go to save their kids?

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Lena Dunham writing four-part story for Archie Comics: See the first image

We know that Lena Dunham can make a TV show, but can she write a good comic book arc? Looks like we’re going to find out.

Archie Comics have announced that Dunham will be writing a four-party Archie story to be published in 2015. Dunahm’s story will follow Archie and the gang when they run into a new reality show filming in Riverdale.

“I was an avid Archie collector as a child — conventions, first editions that l kept in plastic sleeves, the whole shebang,” Dunham said in a press release. “It has so much cultural significance but also so much personal significance, and to get to play with these beloved characters is a wild creative opportunity.”

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PopWatch Planner: The Oscars go live, 'Bates Motel' premieres, 'True Detective' ends, and more

I sincerely hope your DVRs aren’t full, because this week has quite a few must-watch events. For starters, tonight features the most glamorous evening of the year — the Academy Awards. Speaking of which, be sure to check our site around showtime for all of your coverage needs.

And come Monday, it’s time to welcome back the Bates family for another season of mystery and general creepiness. Add in a new Pharrell album, Wes Anderson’s latest film, and the True Detective season finale, and we’d say your week is looking pretty good right about now.

Here your entertainment plan for the week:

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Google Doodle celebrates John Steinbeck's birthday

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Google is celebrating what would have been John Steinbeck’s 112th birthday by highlighting some of his most popular works in its homepage Doodle today.

Click anywhere on the drawing, and you’ll be taken to images depicting some of the Steinbeck’s most iconic books. Five in all, the set includes The Grapes of Wrath, Cannery Row, Of Mice and Men, The Pearl, and Travels with Charley. (Oddly, East of Eden was left off the list.) After arriving at the image, users can then click anywhere on the picture to summon a famous quote from the story, which appears over the drawing.

Steinbeck authored 27 books over his lifetime, and received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1962. The Pulitzer Prize-winning author passed away in 1968.

'Star-Crossed' reminds us of pop culture's greatest breakup line: The 'different worlds' excuse

It only took two episodes of Star-Crossed for someone to utter the line we’d all been waiting for (and secretly hoping would kick off the pilot): “We’re from two different worlds.” To be fair, in Star-Crossed‘s case, that is an accurate statement. Emery is from Earth and Roman is from Atria, a planet we know little about other than that it’s dying and yet somehow superior to Mars. Intergalactic drama, amirite?

But in watching Roman pull the “different worlds” card, I couldn’t help but be transported back to the second episode of The O.C. Fans of the show will remember the moment well. It was the first time Ryan and Marissa confessed that they had any sort of feelings for each other. She showed up at the model home on his last night asking to stay, and he told her, “We’re from different worlds.” She tried to deny it, but he followed it up with, “I’m not like you.” Basically, he was comparing her privileged, party-filled upbringing to his grainy, misdemeanor-filled life in Chino.

Long story short, this got me thinking: How many times have I heard some version of this “different worlds” crap, and what does it even mean?! This is what I came up with: READ FULL STORY

PopWatch Planner: 'The Voice' premieres, 'Scandal' returns, and The Fray's new album hits shelves

Aaaannnd exhale. After weeks of Olympic coverage, it’s just about time to get back to our regularly scheduled programming. My DVR might not be happy about, but I’m over the moon.

This is the week when your favorite shows find their way back to your TV screens. From the long-awaited returns of Scandal and Grey’s Anatomy to the season premieres of Dallas and The Voice, it’s hard to go wrong with your television choices. Meanwhile, at the theater, Liam Neeson is heating up the screen, and elsewhere, we’ve found book and album releases that are not to be missed. Basically, you’ve got a lot of work to do this week. Enjoy!

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