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Tag: Woody Harrelson (1-10 of 15)

'Saturday Night Live' best host poll: Martin Freeman joins the fellowship of Studio 8H

For a guy who’s the star of a billion-dollar franchise, Martin Freeman isn’t exactly Johnny Depp or Brad Pitt—though he did get a laugh out of jokingly referring to himself as the “funny George Clooney.” But the unassuming Brit who plays the clever Bilbo Baggins in The Hobbit is not to be underestimated—especially as a first-time host on Saturday Night Live. The original lovelorn Office drone in Ricky Gervais’ groundbreaking series delivered one of the best episodes of the season, working at a Middle-earth paper company, marrying a WNBA superstar, and chilling with his British chums, Maggie Smith and Alan Rickman.

Even though he’s not as big a star as some of this year’s other hosts, he’s an immediate threat in our ongoing Mr. Saturday Night poll, which is still waiting for a dominating performance to take control of the race. Cameron Diaz debuted in first place after her episode, but one week later, she was eliminated. James Franco now sits atop the pack, but he scored only marginally higher than Diaz had. Might Freeman shake up the standings again?

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'Saturday Night Live' best host poll: Can James Franco go the distance?

As far as hosting Saturday Night Live goes, you can’t ask for much more than someone like James Franco. That’s not to say that everything he did on the most recent episode was comedy gold, but he’s bold—not the kind of guy who probably says no to too many sketch suggestions. There’s no doubt he was having a good time when he was on the Studio 8H stage, giddy not only for the winning gags but also the moments that threatened to go off the rails. There seemed to be some of both.

It will be interesting to see which of those scenarios ultimately tips the scales with voters. Franco was game, playing Christopher Walken’s Captain Hook, an aging Luke Skywalker, a raging mayoral runnerup, and an exasperated bridge troll. He joins a Mr. Saturday Night contest that’s been wide open since Chris Pratt was eliminated. Cameron Diaz sits in first place after hosting recently, but she leads with only 31.51 percent of the vote—not a particularly auspicious debut.

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'Saturday Night Live' best host poll: Cameron Diaz crashes the boys club

In the three years EW has been handing out an award for the best Saturday Night Live host, men have dominated the competition. (Though it might be more accurate just to say that Jimmy Fallon and Justin Timberlake have dominated.) Melissa McCarthy has been runner-up twice, but for the most part, guys have topped the weekly polls. As a result, we’ve taken to calling our best-host poll the race for Mr. Saturday Night. But it doesn’t have to be, obviously.

One week after Sarah Silverman was eliminated, Cameron Diaz hosted SNL, and she now faces a quartet of guys, led by Woody Harrelson. Diaz was game, spoon-feeding Baby Boss, grooving with the Yr Girls, and getting her Ms. Hannigan on. Perhaps this season will end with the crowning of the first Ms. Saturday Night.

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'Saturday Night Live' best host poll: Cheers to Woody Harrelson

Six episodes into the 40th anniversary year of Saturday Night Live, one thing is clear. Though the show itself might be slowly emerging from the oft-cited “transition year,” the institution still has meaning—especially to the guest hosts who initially visited in the show’s heyday. Thus far, three of the guests—Jim Carrey, Chris Rock, and Woody Harrelson—first hosted the show in the previous century. Two others, in addition to Rock, of course—Sarah Silverman and Bill Hader—are SNL alums. [Unconfirmed rumor: The show lobbied hard for Bill Murray to host the season premiere.] Conclusion is, SNL is working hard to get back to its roots.

The sad news is that we had to bid sayonara to one of our favorites during the first round of this season’s Mr. Saturday Night contest, in which we vote for the best host. READ FULL STORY

Woody Harrelson hosts 'Saturday Night Live': Talk about it here!

Will the odds be in Woody Harrelson’s favor when he hosts Saturday Night Live tonight? Let’s examine the evidence.

Pro: He has hosted the show twice before (and did a cameo in host Kirstie Alley’s monologue back in ’91, along with the rest of the Cheers gang), so he understands what’s expected of him and should be fairly comfortable coming back to Studio 8H. Con: He hasn’t hosted since the Bush administration. The first Bush administration.

Harrelson’s last SNL stint began with a cold open about Johnny Carson leaving The Tonight Show; characters appearing on the episode included Adam Sandler’s Opera Man and a Rob Schneider invention called “Jeff, the Sensitive Naked Man.” Harrelson’s big sketch revolved around his boyish good looks and perfectly sculpted chest. Another ended with a Rodney King joke. In short: It was a different time.

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Woody Harrelson kills and arouses on 'SNL' promos

SNL‘s Taran Killam suffers a variety of indignities on this week’s promos alongside host Woody Harrelson. READ FULL STORY

'True Detective' post-mortem: Creator Nic Pizzolatto on happy endings, season 2, and the future of Cohle and Hart

True Detective wrapped its celebrated, intensely parsed first season last night with a finale that has invited a wide variety of reactions. Your opinion might hinge on whether or not you found the revelation of The Yellow King — Errol Childress, aka The Lawnmower Man — and his evil to be interesting and a surprisingly uplifting, optimistic ending for Rust Cohle (Matthew McConaughey) and Marty Hart (Woody Harrelson) to be the correct call for the series.  The man behind the madness stands behind his choices, although the writer (best known before this for the crime novel Galveston) sounds a bit relieved that the roller coaster ride of his first major work for television has reached its conclusion.  “Our long national nightmare is over!” laughs Nic Pizzolatto, jumping on the phone not long after the east coasting airing, and before watching the finale with his family and music supervisor T. Bone Burnett at McConaughey’s house. In this brief interview, Pizzolatto discusses his endgame vision, clarifies Errol’s master plan, and teases season 2 of True Detective — and the future of Cohle and Hart.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: So let’s talk about the twist ending: Rust Cohle and Marty Hart walk away from this alive. I was not expecting that. I also wasn’t expecting that we’d get to see them process the experience to the extent that they did. And then there was the strong note of optimism at the end. Why did you want to end this story this way?

NIC PIZZOLATTO: A few reasons. We’re never going to spend time with these guys again. And killing characters on television has become an easy short cut to cathartic emotion. So I thought killing the guys, or having something more mysterious happen to them  – like the guys charged into Errol’s underworld, and disappeared, and nobody knows what happens to them – would have been the same thing if the show had gone full-bore into the supernatural: To me, it would have been puerile, and it would have skirted all the issues the show raised. To me, the challenge was to not only let these guys live, but show true character change through this journey. That passing through the eye of the needle in the heart of darkness has actually done something to them.

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'True Detective' finale review: Truth, justice, and the satisfying surprise of a happy ending

Culminating a remarkable first season in fine, moving form, True Detective’s finale, titled “Form and Void,” took us to the heart of darkness at the vortex center of its weird fiction — as well as  the final stage of its meta-commentary on the stories we tell ourselves, about ourselves, for better and worse. It was a tale that ripped dark marks on our bellies, then soothed us by “making flowers” on us. So to speak.

We start on the outskirts of the infernal plane. We begin in hell on earth. The ersatz underworld of The Yellow King — a.k.a. Errol Childress, a perverse product of paternal abuse, generational evil, and his own deranged, pop-culture informed myth-making — was a theater of the mind for a fantasy made real: His vision of Carcosa, the necropolis of Ambrose Bierce and the fallen world of Robert W. Chambers, littered with dead trees and body bags. Childress lured Cohle into his ascension chamber — the staging area for so many murders, and last night, a stage for an ancient ritual, the oldest story of all. Light versus dark. Good versus evil. “Little priest” versus wannabe Elder God. It was The Real World: Dungeons and Dragons, and Cohle, hard boiled to the core, was ready to play. I’ll see your abyss and gaze right back, Lawnmower Man!

He was fooling himself. Rust Cohle has always been fooling himself. His cynicism, his callousness were parts of the mask he wore to engage the world, to deal with himself. But it offered no protection when his mind — tweaking from the fetid evil around him — conspired against him and waylaid him with a vision of a coal-black vortex spiraling down to claim him. Maybe you were thinking: They’re going to do it! Cthulhu is coming! Coming to take us away, ha-ha! Ho-ho! Hee-hee! Beam me up, Lovecraft!

But no. It was gotcha moment, for Rust, and for us. READ FULL STORY

'True Detective': The most insightful fan tributes

If you’ve watched one episode of True Detective, HBO’s gritty meditation on good vs. evil, you’ve likely consumed them all — rabidly, and multiple times. Not since Lost has a television series so deeply tapped into our obsessive conspiracy theorist sides. And not since fans asked “What is the Island?” has the Internet been pondering one singular TV question: Who is the Yellow King? 

At its core, True Detective is a story about two detectives, Rustin Cohle (Matthew McConaughey) and Martin Hart (Woody Harrelson), partners who are haunted by a grisly occult murder that took place in Louisiana in 1995. (Spoilers ahead, so read on with caution.) The series time-jumps through 17 years of Rust and Marty’s tense relationship, from a horrific showdown with the (supposed) murderers in 1995, to the pair’s major falling-out in 2002, to a 2012 reconciliation of sorts prompted by the “debt” that weighs on both of their souls — the revelation that the killer is still out there.

The creepy clues revealed throughout the episodes so far have viewers obsessing over every little, beautifully crafted detail. Why was the body of Dora Lange, Rust and Cohle’s 1995 murder victim, found bound in a praying position under a tree, wearing only a crown made of deer antlers? The detectives keep coming across devil’s nests and painted spirals, whispers of Carcosa and the Yellow King. Rust is convinced the disappearances of women and children along the Louisiana Gulf for years have been tied to Lange’s ritualistic murder. Is the Tuttle family, powerful both politically and in the religious institutions of the Katrina-ravaged bayou, behind it all? In last week’s penultimate episode we met the oft-mentioned “tall man with scars,” who may also be the Spaghetti Monster — and the real killer. Or is he just a pawn?

True Detective creator Nic Pizzolatto recently debunked the idea that either Rust or Marty were behind the murders, but plenty of other theories abound. Some fans have laid out their theses and True Detective tributes in painstaking detail for other obsessives to pore over; below are some of the most intriguing. Tune in to HBO on Sunday at 9 p.m. ET for the season finale, and to find out which ones were closest to the mark. READ FULL STORY

'True Detective' episode 2 react: The Fault in Our Stars

“Seeing Things” was about the search for truth and the avoidance of it. It was about being known, and wanting to remaining unknowable. It was about the occult — not in the supernatural sense of the term, but in the Latin, as in ‘that which is clandestine, hidden, concealed,’ and how our understanding of a person or thing changes when secrets are revealed. So it was about SPOILERS! READ FULL STORY

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