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Tag: Videogames (41-50 of 503)

'BioShock Infinite' review, with an addendum

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Here is the review of BioShock Infinite that I wrote for this week’s print edition of Entertainment Weekly:

The original BioShock is a definite contender for the Greatest Games of All Time list. The 2007 undersea dystopian adventure could have been just one of the niftiest first-person shooters ever. But creator Ken Levine infused the game with a surprising amount of intellectual depth. (How many games do you know that deconstruct Ayn Rand?) READ FULL STORY

'BioShock Infinite' trailer: The gameplay looks good, too -- VIDEO

In the long lead-up to the release of BioShock Infinite, you’ve probably read a lot about how visionary game developer Ken Levine has layered all sorts of intriguing big-idea themes into the new game. You’ve probably also read a few think-pieces about the original BioShock, a videogame that functioned as a deconstruction of Ayn Rand’s principles of Objectivism. Lost in all this deep-think chatter is the fact that the original BioShock was also an addictively fun game. The newest trailer for Infinite puts the focus on the gameplay, with a whole elaborate array of weapons and superpowers.

Watch the trailer below: READ FULL STORY

SXSW 2013: Five tech trends we can't wait to see

Just a brief look at the South By Southwest interactive schedule can boggle even the most experienced festival-goer’s mind. There are panels and conversations and films and workshops and even a daily 7:30 am run (in cowboy costume!) in case you weren’t getting enough exercise dancing your pants off at one of the many parties. But for everyone not going to the festival, which marks 19 years of interactive and film coverage this year, we have started to make sense of some already-emerging trends and news to look out for as the unofficial “spring break for nerds” kicks off in Austin, Texas.
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'Assassin's Creed IV' trailer: Boats, babes, and beards

I know what you’re thinking: the last Assassin’s Creed just came out! Well, just as developer Ubisoft promised, Assassin’s Creed IV: Black Flag appears to be a departure from the tangled technological-mystical web woven by previous entries in the series.

In the two minutes of released footage (all almost-uncanny CGI images) we see a cranky old pirate/Blackbeard lecture a room of younger pirates about the scariest seafarer he’s ever known: Captain Edward Kenway, a familiar-looking monk/warrior who murders and saunters about murderously. For a few seconds, a bed of naked wenches smile at him as he heads off to his grisly work.

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'Star Trek: The Video Game' and Gorn supremacy

This is a big year for all lifeforms in Federation space — the Hollywood film franchise returns in May with Star Trek Into Darkness and then Star Trek: The Video Game seeks out new brand frontiers with its April arrival — but no alien race is heating up more than the cold-blooded Gorn, represented above by their rapacious leader.

In the original Trek series, the alien reptile hegemony was represented by but one individual, the menacing captain of a Gorn ship who tussled with Starfleet Captain James T. Kirk in a 1967 episode called “Arena.” That was it for the Gorn on the ABC series; the Vulcans, Klingons and Romulans (the glamour aliens in the Star Trek universe) showed up again and again but the Gorn never got a callback and were cast off like old snakeskin — well, if snakes were made of stiff rubber.

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'The Final Hours of Tomb Raider': App looks at bringing game back to life

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The new Tomb Raider launches on consoles and PCs tomorrow, and it’s a bold reboot of the hit franchise (see this week’s issue of EW for Keith Staskiewicz’ story on reimagining gaming’s most famous heroine, Lara Croft). After 2008’s Tomb Raider: Underworld underperformed, developer Crystal Dynamics sought to reinvent a Lara Croft who could compete with Uncharted’s Nathan Drake and reinstate her to her prior glory. They succeeded spectacularly. But getting there wasn’t easy, as documented by veteran games journalist Geoff Keighley in The Final Hours of Tomb Raider, an app launching today that chronicles the long, arduous task of reinvigorating a gaming icon.

Keighley gave EW a sneak peek at the comprehensive app, which offers an insightful behind-the-scenes look at the making of the game. Having previously detailed the final hours of Portal 2 and Mass Effect 3, Keighley spent nearly two years following Crystal Dynamics, gaining unparalleled access to the studio’s creative process. READ FULL STORY

Willem Dafoe is acting opposite Ellen Page in the videogame 'Beyond: Two Souls'

BEYOND--Two-Souls

Remember last summer, when auteurist videogame designer David Cage revealed that he was working on Beyond: Two Souls, a game starring Ellen Page? Turns out Page isn’t the only Oscar-nominated actor involved in Beyond. Cage’s studio Quantic Dream revealed this morning that beloved crazy-eyed psychotic Willem Dafoe will also appear in the game. Dafoe plays Nathan Dawkins, a researcher who meets Ellen Page’s character as a little girl and apparently reappears later in her life. Based on the reveal trailer, it looks like Dafoe is playing a combination of Donald Pleasence from Halloween and Lorraine Bracco from The Sopranos. Check out the reveal below: READ FULL STORY

First image from 'Assassin's Creed IV': Yo ho ho and a bottle of KILL

The Assassin’s Creed franchise has adopted an annual-release model the last few years, presenting gamers with a new opportunity every fall to jump across the rooftops of their favorite densely-researched historical cityscapes. But last year’s Assassin’s Creed 3 seemed to mark a turning point for the franchise. We don’t know much about the next entry, but Ubisoft just released an evocative bit of key art which reveals two things: 1. The name of the game, and 2. A very rough idea of the setting. Take a look: READ FULL STORY

'Tomb Raider' actress Camilla Luddington discusses playing the new Lara Croft

Lara Croft had approximately 0.6 seconds as the adventurous, crypt-crawling Indiana Jane she was intended to be before she was immediately burdened with absurd physical proportions and tasked with propping up the half-formed sexual fantasies of millions of teenage boys. It’s a fact that mars her achievement as one of the first popular female protagonists in gaming—after all, Mario never had to look like Fabio — and shows that just because you’re polygonal, doesn’t mean you’re three-dimensional. But developer Crystal Dynamics is hoping to change all that with Tomb Raider, their upcoming reboot that hits stores March 5 and serves as a gritty origin story-slash-fresh start for Croft.

The actress who reimagined this iconic character was Camilla Luddington, known for playing Kate Middleton in the royal courtship Lifetime movie William & Kate and more recently for playing Dr. Jo Wilson on Grey’s Anatomy. Not only did the English actress voice Croft, but she also provided her movements, recording most of the game’s action and cut-scenes with elaborate motion capture. We spoke with Luddington about inhabiting the (now somewhat more realistic) body of gaming’s premier action-hero archeologist. (Sorry, Nathan Drake.)
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Videogame review: Lara Croft channels her inner Katniss in bold 'Tomb Raider' reboot

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“I hate tombs,” Lara Croft sighs as she enters a musty crypt in Tomb Raider, Crystal Dynamics’ bold reboot of the long-running series. The franchise had grown a bit musty in recent iterations, bogged down in clumsy shooting and silly supernatural elements like an evil Lara doppelgänger, and distancing itself from the core experience of, you know, raiding tombs. Despite a string of solid if unspectacular efforts, Lara’s star had faded considerably, and Uncharted’s Nathan Drake largely supplanted her as gaming’s top adventurer, in gameplay and graphics –until now. This new Lara has taken a page from Drake’s exploits and is officially reclaiming her throne.

In this new origin story, Lara is not a girl, not yet a woman when she is shipwrecked on a mysterious island. Separated from her crew and visibly scared, she is forced to grow up quickly when a murderous cult kidnaps her friends. Armed with a bow and arrow, she channels The Hunger Games’ Katniss Everdeen in sheer grit and determination, gaining new weapons and abilities that open up the world as the game progresses in a nod to gaming’s first lady, Metroid’s Samus Aran.
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