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Tag: Videogames (41-50 of 524)

Nintendo Wii U sales triple after price drop

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While the videogame world waits quivering with trepidatious excitement for the oncoming arrival of the PlayStation 4 and the Xbox One, Nintendo has seen a significant jump in sales for its third-way Wii U. As reported by GamesIndustry, the tablet-control console saw a 200 percent spike in sales last month, following a $50 drop in price for the Wii U Deluxe Set to $299. READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly: 'Grand Theft Auto V' is one of the most depressing videogames ever made

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Grand Theft Auto V is what it looks like when a suicidal architect builds a skyscraper. The game is beautiful and it is empty. I don’t mean that as an insult. The game might actually be about emptiness; it regards the human condition with less sentimentality than Werner Herzog. I can’t help but recommend Grand Theft Auto V, because I’ve played it for at least fifty hours. It is probably the best-made Grand Theft Auto game ever, and it is also the most soulless, which probably explains why it is so much fun. If this sounds paradoxical, it’s because of two basic truths that you only really understand after you’ve finished the game’s story, which took me about three weeks of sleepless nights and lost weekends: READ FULL STORY

'Grand Theft Auto V' sales are huge: Over $800 million in one day

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Turns out there’s an enormous market for violent wish-fulfillment fantasies stuffed with fast cars, flamethrowers, and tennis. Who knew?

Take-Two Interactive Software announced yesterday that the Grand Theft Auto series’ long-awaited fifth chapter has taken off like a heistmaster in a speedboat. The company estimates that GTA V generated over $800 million in sales worldwide in just one day. (The game retails for $59.99 in the U.S.)

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'Grand Theft Auto V' review (Part One): A big huge epic about big hugeness

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Grand Theft Auto V is the biggest and messiest game I’ve played in years. It’s a quieter Grand Theft Auto but also a louder Grand Theft Auto, a more mature Grand Theft Auto and a shockingly adolescent Grand Theft Auto. It’s set in a big huge FauxCal where Los Angeles is a 10-minute drive from Lake Tahoe and the policemen actually notice when you break traffic laws. If you can imagine an automobile, you can probably steal it in Grand Theft Auto V. At the turning point of videogame generations, with a whole rush of big-huge open-world games arriving in the next 12 months, this is Rockstar Games’ bold, beautiful, and batcrap-crazy proof that nobody does Big Huge like they do Big Huge. It’s their Watch the Throne, their Olympics Opening Ceremony; it’s The Videogame-as-Mic-Drop.

The game features three protagonists: Retired heistmaster Michael, who’s like an older version of the protagonist Ray Liotta played in Vice City; Rookie criminal Franklin, who’s the most realistic, most admirable, and most boring of the leads; and insane semi-human Trevor, who looks like Jack Nicholson on a decade-long meth bender and talks like Yosemite Sam reciting with a libertarian comment board.
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Entertainment Geekly: Why 'Spelunky' could be the future of videogames

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Entertainment Geekly is a weekly column that examines contemporary pop culture through a geek lens and simultaneously examines contemporary geek culture through a pop lens. So many lenses!

In the last 12 years, there have been better games than Grand Theft Auto III. But I don’t think there’s any game that has been more influential, both in terms of changing its own medium and — just as importantly — changing the whole popular conception of what the medium is supposed to be. When Grand Theft Auto III came out in 2001, it pointed the way toward a new era of videogames: An era when games would be worlds without boundaries, with characters who looked and acted like real human beings speaking non-translated dialogue, with novelistic stories that would be about something beyond rescuing princesses or defeating final bosses.
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Stan Lee gets LEGO makeover in videogame series' latest brick-busting entry -- EXCLUSIVE TRAILER

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The popular LEGO videogame franchise has given minifig makeovers to everyone from The Joker to Jar Jar Binks, but the series’ latest plastic plaything may be its most fan-pleasing yet. On top of sporting a brimming slate of spandex-clad day-savers and cackling evil-doers, LEGO: Marvel Super Heroes adds comic book legend Stan Lee to its caped and cowled cast.

While details on Lee’s inclusion are scarce, the following exclusive trailer suggests he can channel many of his creations’ super-skills, from web-slinging like Spidey to barbequing baddies Cyclops’ style. The 90-year-old icon has made multiple cameos in movies and games before, but his casting as a playable, LEGO-fied crime-fighter looks to be his beefiest role to date.

LEGO: Marvel Super Heroes doesn’t land till later this fall, but fans can get their first peek of the silver-haired hero in action right here. Watch it below: READ FULL STORY

NCAA to stop putting name, logo on EA video game

Hang on to NCAA Football 2014, all you video game fans. It will be a collector’s edition.

The NCAA said Wednesday it will bar Electronic Arts Inc. from using its logo and name beginning next year. The move ends a lucrative, eight-year business deal with the gaming industry giant and it comes as the NCAA fights a high-profile lawsuit that says the governing body owes billions of dollars to former players for allowing their likenesses to be used for free.

The NCAA said it won’t seek a new contract with EA Sports, which manufactures the popular game, beyond the current one that expires in June 2014. However, that won’t stop EA Sports from producing a college football video game depicting powerhouse schools such as Alabama, Ohio State and Oregon, and the Redwood City, Calif.-based company made that clear.

“EA Sports will continue to develop and publish college football games, but we will no longer include the NCAA names and marks,” said Andrew Wilson, executive vice president. “Our relationship with the Collegiate Licensing Co. is strong and we are already working on a new game for next generation consoles which will launch next year and feature the college teams, conferences and all the innovation fans expect from EA Sports.”
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Comic-Con gets videogame treatment in 'Comic ConQuest' -- First look reveal

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Having already been featured in television, books, and film, it was only a matter of time before Comic-Con culture got the videogame treatment. Inspired by San Diego’s annual gathering of sci-fi-, fantasy-, and superhero-loving geeks, Comic ConQuest is a tactical role-playing game adventure set within a sprawling comic book and science fiction convention. Much like the crowded show floor at SDCC, Comic ConQuest is filled with fans dressed as their favorite fictional characters; unlike ComicCon’s cos-players, however, the game’s costumed attendees actually possess the powers of those they’re pretending to be. READ FULL STORY

OUYA review: The good, the bad, and the ugly of the compact console

Last summer, a tiny video game console prototype made big waves on Kickstarter when it raised $8.5 million, more than 900 percent of its crowd-sourcing goal. The Android-based OUYA promised an open platform, a low $99 price point and a free-to-try model that would provide a disruptive indie alternative to the Big Three video game companies.

The pre-release version shipped to backers in April and received a decidedly mixed reception, though OUYA promised that many of the problems would be fixed for its June 25 retail release. So does the little console live up to the hype, or is it a glorified Android phone that plugs into your TV? After spending a week with the OUYA, the answer to both is a resounding maybe.
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Is a vast hoard of 'E.T.' videogames really buried at a landfill site in New Mexico?

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We may never find out if Big Foot exists, who Carly Simon wrote “You’re So Vain” about, or whether Leonardo DiCaprio is dreaming at the end of Inception. But there is one pop culture mystery which might be cleared up in the near future. For decades, it has been rumored that Atari buried millions of copies of its E.T. videogame at a landfill site in Alamogordo, New Mexico. Now, the Alamogordo city council has given the Los Angeles-based Fuel Entertainment permission to search the site for a film project and find out if one of the videogame industry’s most enduring myths is fact or fiction. “The dumping of the E.T. cartridges has always been one of the biggest urban legends in videogame history,” says Mike Burns, cofounder and CEO of Fuel Entertainment’s parent company, Fuel Industries. “We wanted to find out what’s really in there and put an end to the rumors.”

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