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Tag: Video Games (1-10 of 70)

'Playable Teaser' trailer reveals the brilliance behind the horror game

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Coming out of last month’s Gamescom, a small horror game called P.T., or The Playable Teaser, stole the spotlight. Downloadable for free on the PlayStation 4, the game came with virtually no warning or explanation. Instead, it let players exploreand be horrified bythe game for themselves.

P.T. initially presents itself as a simple affair, set in the hallway of an average-looking house. Players start at one end and walk through the hall to a door that seemingly leads to a garage. But that door instead opens back into the hallway. In each subsequent loop, the hallway changes, and the story of a gruesome double murder comes into focus. There’s plenty of creepy imagery, a seemingly random puzzle to solve, and more than a few jump scares to satiate any horror fan. (I played with friends who screamed so loudly, my neighbors knocked on our wall to quiet down.)

The game’s mysteries were quickly solvedit turned out the game was actually a teaser for the upcoming Silent Hillsbut the brilliance of P.T.‘s scares and simplicity are still a marvel. Now, its creators have given players a chance to see the game’s even more bizarre origins.

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'Disney Infinity 2.0': Anything your heart, or imagination, desires

Disney Infinity 2.0 made me feel eight years old. And I mean that in the best way possible.

There’s a certain magic to playing with toys when you’re young. Action figures spring to life in your imagination, and pieces of furniture transform into the sites of epic battles. A hallway can become a racetrack, a chair a mountaintop, and all it takes is a couple plastic figures to create a spark of inspiration.

Infinity 2.0 lets players create whatever they can imagine, and the spark this time around is bringing together the Mouse House’s vast catalogue of franchises and some of the most famous superheroes in the world, Marvel’s Avengers. By creating a cohesive art style and setting players loose in the game’s Toy Box mode, Infinity 2.0 is a brilliant package for kids looking for a creative outlook—and it can satisfy an older crowd, too.

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'Bloodborne' continues to look terrifying, definitely has blood

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Maybe you’ve heard of From Software. It’s a studio famous for games with the word “Souls” in them. If you ask anyone about these games, they’ll probably describe them in one word: “hard.” (Or two words, provided there’s an expletive in there. People have strong feelings about these games.)

While that’s true—Demons’ Souls, Dark Souls, and Dark Souls II are far from easy—reducing the games to their difficulty sells them short. The Souls games are experiences—there’s nothing quite like them anywhere else. And Bloodborne, From Software’s latest game, looks like it’ll continue the trend. It also looks absolutely terrifying. READ FULL STORY

'Final Fantasy XV' has a gorgeous new trailer, might actually come out

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Final Fantasy XV has been through a lot. First announced way back in 2006 as Final Fantasy Versus XIII (don’t ask), FFXV has been the Moby Dick of video games for both fans of the Japanese Role Playing Game genre and developer Square Enix.

After eight years of waiting with almost no word on the status of the game, it’s easy to get jaded. And then an amazing new trailer comes out and everything is exciting again.
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The makers of 'Borderlands' are back with another crazy genre mashup

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On paper, Battleborn—game development studio Gearbox Software’s big follow up to its successful Borderlands series of games—might sound like the studio is repeating itself. After all, Battleborn, like Borderlands, is a first-person shooter that freely grabs interesting ideas from other genres and repackages them into something with a distinct style and personality.

But that’s not very fair.

Games can be a lot like sandwiches—while technically, every sandwich is simply “bread with stuff in between,” there is a world of difference between a Monte Cristo and a PB&J, with plenty of room for experimentation in between. Similar to how the vast and interesting world of sandwiches can be terribly wronged by our desire to label everything, video games deserve a little bit more than a few genre descriptors. But don’t worry, the genre descriptors are coming.

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'Destiny' makes over $300 million in its first week

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Over $500 million worth of copies of Destiny were shipped to stores in anticipation of the game’s release last week. And with today’s newly announced sales figures, it looks like Bungie’s latest franchise is off to an impressive start.

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Burning questions about 'Middle-earth: Shadow of Mordor,' answered

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The world of J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings hasn’t left the same mark on the video game medium that it has in film, though many attempts have been made. The Battle for Middle-earth strategy games? Good, but the series lasted for only a few years. The Rings Lego games? Also fun, but the Middle-earth setting is just one of several major properties to be Legoized. Even the games connected to the original trilogy films have their upsides but were never critical darlings.

Middle-earth: Shadow of Mordor hopes to change that. The game has received plenty of buzz leading up to its release on Sept. 30, promising an original story in Tolkien’s world that explores the deep lore while innovating on familiar gameplay mechanics.

So what exactly sets this adventure apart, and will it make Mordor the one game to rule them all—or at least rule the fall season? That question will be answered when the game debuts later this month, but there are plenty more worth asking about why Mordor is worth Rings fans’—and newcomers’—time. Here are answers to some swirling questions about the game, which should give players all they need to know going into the game’s launch.

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Why everyone needs to pay closer attention to the video game industry

Monday morning, Microsoft announced it was purchasing Swedish game development studio Mojang AB, makers of the staggeringly popular multi-platform video game Minecraftfor $2.4 billion. It’s a massive deal, with huge implications. Talk of the deal had been swirling for a week, and the rumored acquisition was a genuine surprise to the games and tech industry; Bloomberg stated that the purchase would be the biggest deal Microsoft has made since CEO Satya Nadella replaced Steve Ballmer as the company’s top executive three years ago.

But the mainstream press struggled to fathom why one of the biggest names in tech would want Mojang, at least for such an enormous price. In keeping with a reporting trend that follows any major happening in the games industry, there was a layer of incredulity to the proceedings.

There shouldn’t have been.

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The hype train derailed: EW's 'Destiny' journal, pt. 3

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Destiny has been out nearly a week now, and EW is putting the futuristic shared-world shooter through the paces in our ongoing journal. This is the third entry; read the preceding posts from Joshua Rivera and Jonathon Dornbush.

Big picture, Destiny doesn’t live up to the hype. How could it? Bungie’s first non-Halo game since 2001 and first title with mega-publisher Activision cost a reported $500 million to develop and market (those gargantuan wraparound ads in Times Square can’t be cheap). The studio promised great things, so naturally expectations were sky-high. Alas, add it to the list of much-hyped 2014 releases such as Titanfall, Infamous: Second Son and Watch Dogs that have disappointed by merely being good, not great. (Well, except for Watch Dogs, which doesn’t even qualify for “good.”) The PS4 and Xbox One have been out for nearly a year, and people are still looking for a reason to justify dropping $400–$500 on a new system. Destiny probably isn’t it. After all, it’s available on previous generation hardware, and while it doesn’t look as pretty, it plays the same. So it doesn’t live up to the massive hype.

But my bigger concern is that it doesn’t even live up to Bungie’s Halo games. READ FULL STORY

Microsoft announces acquisition of 'Minecraft' developer

Mojang may not be a household name, but the game developer’s title Minecraft is. The game that allows users to build just about anything they can imagine has attracted more than 100 million players and is available on just about every platform imaginable, from Windows PC to PlayStation 3 to iOS devices.

It’s now one of the most popular games to play on the Xbox 360, and Microsoft took note of the game’s success. The company announced today it will acquire Mojang and the Minecraft franchise for $2.5 billion.

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