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Tag: Tim Burton (1-10 of 21)

'The Nightmare Before Christmas' turns 20 -- but is it a Halloween or Christmas movie!?

Tim Burton’s seminal stop-motion classic The Nightmare Before Christmas turns 20 years old today, which is surprising since Jack Skellington is looking as slim as ever. That means that the question of when-do-you-watch-it has never been more relevant. READ FULL STORY

Creators of Broadway's 'Big Fish' share how they translated movie magic to the stage

Even before Big Fish hit movie theaters in 2003, screenwriter John August knew its yarn-spinning hero was bound for Broadway. “You look at Edward Bloom’s stories…and they feel like production numbers,” says August. “There are moments when words fail you, and you break into song. That’s what [the film] was missing.”

Buoyed by a rash of screen-to-stage hits — including three of the last five Best Musical Tony winners (Kinky Boots, Once, and Billy Elliot) — Big Fish, the moving, epic tale of a father and son opens tonight at the Great White Way’s Neil Simon Theatre. “Broadway is a risky business,” admits producer Dan Jinks, “but if the show works… investors can make far more money than they would make traditionally on Wall Street, and I’ve just always had this tremendous belief in the story that we were telling.”

It didn’t hurt that Jinks and August stacked the deck by enlisting some stage pros for the live version of his film, including composer Andrew Lippa (The Addams Family) and Susan Stroman, the director-choreographer of 2001’s Tony-sweeping hit The Producers, which was itself based on Mel Brooks’ 1968 film. So how did August, Jinks, and Stroman combine movie magic with good, old-fashioned stagecraft to hook audiences in for their fantastical re-imagining? Read on… READ FULL STORY

'Big Fish' on Broadway: A musical sneak peek -- EXCLUSIVE

The splashy new musical version of Big Fish — the beloved 2003 Tim Burton film, as well as a heralded Daniel Wallace novel before that — is fully under way in previews at Broadway’s Neil Simon Theatre for an opening on Oct. 6. But you now have a cushy pre-opening seat (after the jump) to witness key moments from the new Susan Stroman-Andrew Lippa-John August tuner, which teases chorines, giants, acrobats, and elephants (oh my!), as well as the always-endearing glimpse of the inimitable Norbert Leo Butz tenderly essaying a catchy new song. And best of all, unlike the film, you don’t have to witness the irreversible sight of Danny DeVito’s bare bottom. Enjoy, stage fans!
READ FULL STORY

Gene Wilder still upset over Tim Burton's 'Charlie and the Chocolate Factory': 'I don't care for that director'

When director Tim Burton and Johnny Depp teamed up in 2005 to make a new version of Roald Dahl’s Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Willy Wonka was not pleased. Gene Wilder, who’d famously portrayed the reclusive candyman in the 1971 movie Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory condemned the idea of revisiting the classic, and accused the filmmakers of doing it for the money. “It’s just some people sitting around thinking, ‘How can we make some more money?’ Why else would you remake Willy Wonka? I don’t see the point of going back and doing it all over again,” Wilder said at the time. “I like Johnny Depp and I appreciate that he has said on the record that my shoes would be hard to fill. But I don’t know how it will all turn out. Right now, the only thing that does take some of the edge off this for me is that Willy Wonka’s name isn’t in the title.”

Well, the movie came out, and audiences ate it up like candy, to the sweet tune of $475 million worldwide, but Wilder still hasn’t cooled off. Last night, at a book event at New York’s 92nd Street Y, he called the remake an “insult,” and went out of his way to lay the blame at Burton’s feet. “It’s probably Warner Brothers’ insult, I think. I like Warner Bros for other reasons, but to do that with Johnny Depp, who I think is a good actor and I like him,” Wilder said. “But I don’t care for that director and he’s a talented man, but I don’t care for him for doing stuff like he did.”

Burton’s representatives did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Wilder, 80, was speaking with Robert Osborne at the 92Y to promote his new novel, Something to Remember You By.

Read more:
Mel Brooks honored with AFI Life Achievement Award
What is your damage, creepy boat scene from ‘Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory’?
The Truth About Charlie: Who’s Unhappy About the Remake?

Ryan Gosling joins long line of directors who have cast their wives and girlfriends in movies

Earlier this month, Ryan Gosling cast girlfriend Eva Mendes in his directorial debut, How to Catch a Monster. With production on the fantasy film set to begin this May, Gosling is a few months away from the joys and challenges of directing a significant other.

But Gosling is hardly the first director to cast his sweetheart in his own movie. Woody Allen is famous for dating (and sometimes marrying) many of his leading ladies, and Paul Newman also directed wife Joanne Woodward in multiple films.

Here’s a round-up of other men who have directed their actress significant others — some of whom are still going strong, while others’ relationships are in the rear-view mirror.

Paul W.S. Anderson and Milla Jovovich
This couple met while working on 2002’s Resident Evil. Since they began dating in 2003 (with a wedding following in 2009), Anderson and Jovovich have made four more films in the lucrative zombie franchise. The British director also cast his wife in his 2011 adaptation of The Three Musketeers.
Anderson on directing Jovovich: “I always call her the hardest working person in show business. I’ve never met an actor as dedicated as she is. She’s like the Terminator, relentless. It can be 2 a.m. in the morning, and she suggests we talk about some aspect of the film. How about we don’t, Milla? But we both just love making movies.” [Huffington Post]
Jovovich on working with Anderson: “I tell Paul every day, he spoils me. It is such a pleasure. We have our family together. We do these fun movies together. What am I going to do when I have to go work with somebody else?” [Huffington Post]
Are they still together? Yep. And they’re planning to continue their working relationship too — both are expected to return for a sixth Resident Evil installment. READ FULL STORY

Oscars 2013: Celebs mingle, cheer each other on inside the Dolby Theatre

Inside the Dolby Theatre, the array of dresses, tuxes, champagne flutes, Hollywood chatter, and discussion of which commercial break is best for making a run to the bar sometimes overshadow watching the show itself. Sunday night was no exception, as the audience from our vantage point in the first mezzanine reacted positively to host Seth MacFarlane and screamed loudly for winners like Life of Pi and Argo. But what happens when the show takes a break? Who’s hanging out with whom in the lobby? Here are a few of our favorite insider scenes from Sunday night’s Oscars.

The commercial breaks seem so fast. You may be longing for the DVR when you watch the Oscars at home, but inside, the breaks feel faster than you can say “and the Oscar goes to.” Commercials are the only time you can move into the lobby or back to your seat — and in floor length gowns, that’s no small task.

READ FULL STORY

'Big Fish' musical swimming to Broadway this fall

BIG-FISH

A fishy musical based on Tim Burton’s fantastical 2003 film is coming to the biggest pond of all — Broadway.

The show, which also incorporates material from Daniel Wallace’s original novel Big Fish: A Novel of Mythic Proportions, will open in the Neil Simon Theatre this October. Its Broadway run will be preceded by a five-week limited engagement at Chicago’s Oriental Theatre that begins in April.

Big Fish stars two-time Tony winner Norbert Leo Butz as Edward Bloom, a charismatic storyteller whose tall tales have estranged him from his son Will (Bobby Steggert). As the elder Bloom’s health begins to fail, he decides to tell his child all about his eventful life — a saga featuring giants, werewolves, one-eyed witches, and his true love, Will’s mother, Sandra (Kate Baldwin).

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Our 5 favorite on-screen Frankensteins

Tim Burton’s Frankenweenie hits theaters Friday, telling the age-old story of a boy and his dog. Except this time, the dog’s dead…or, undead. In the movie, Little Victor Frankenstein’s beloved dog Sparky gets hit by a car; distraught, Victor, who fancies himself a scientist, decides to resurrect his deceased pup. All seems well until Victor realizes that bringing the dead back to life has serious, unforeseen consequences.

This stop-motion flick is the latest in a long line of films based on Mary Shelley’s 1818 novel.  And with those adaptations come many, many iterations of her iconic monster. So, after a thorough investigation, we’ve selected our five favorite big-screen versions of Frankenstein’s monster. Check out the full list after the jump.

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Jimmy Kimmel introduces Johnny Depp to an army of Depp impersonators -- VIDEO

If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, Johnny Depp must be one of the most flattered actors in Hollywood. Depp is famous for playing idiosyncratic characters who boast intricate, unique hairstyles and costumes — making him catnip for movie fans who like to play dress-up.

On Jimmy Kimmel Live last night, Depp got up-close and personal with a few of the dudes who make their living as professional Depp impersonators. Well, sort of — Kimmel’s cousin Sal gathered the impersonators outside the show’s studio. Depp then had a chance to speak with them from the safe distance of Jimmy’s set. Though the Oscar nominee was almost disappointingly chilled out when chatting with his doppelgangers — the guy is so laid back that he’s practically horizontal — their interaction did yield a few gems… like when Depp admitted that he’s never seen Edward Scissorhands. Gasp!

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Johnny Depp's inspiration for Willy Wonka: An incredibly stoned George W. Bush

Johnny Depp visited The Ellen DeGeneres Show for the first time today, revealing the inspiration for some of his most iconic characters and his greatest personal terror — dancing. While Dark Shadows costars Michelle Pfeiffer and Chloe Grace Moretz hoofed it as they were introduced to the audience, Depp resisted. “I fear it more than anything in the world,” he told Ellen when she asked him why he refused to dance. “I’d rather swallow a bag of hair.”

Later, the star discussed some of his more famous creations, including Edward Scissorhands, Captain Jack Sparrow, and Willy Wonka. “Certain ingredients you add to these characters — Willy Wonka, for example, I imagined what George Bush would be like…incredible stoned,” he said, as the crowd began laughing at the mention of Bush and Wonka in the same sentence. “Anywhere that you can find a moment of irreverence or absurdity, I’ll stick it right in there — sometimes to the dismay of the director.” Watch the exchange below: READ FULL STORY

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