PopWatch Entertainment Weekly's PopWatch Blog

Tag: This Week's Cover (71-80 of 224)

This Week's Cover: The casts of 'Arrested Development', 'Clueless' and more get back together in the Reunions Issue!

1228-1228-ewcover-multi.jpg

Are you ready for your yearly dose of pop-culture nostalgia? Entertainment Weekly‘s third annual Reunions Issue brings together ten of your favorite TV and movie casts, from The Larry Sanders Show to Breaking Away. To top it off, fans of Arrested Development, Melrose Place, and Clueless can celebrate their pop-culture favorites with special collector’s edition covers, which are available to buy individually. Here’s a sampling of what to expect:

Clueless: The high school satire may have evolved into a coming-of-age classic, but not every cast-member was immediately smitten with their character. Alicia Silverstone recounts her first impression of Cher: “I thought, ‘Who is this girl?’ I had nothing in common with her at all. I thought she was a materialistic, annoying little bitch.” She and co-star Donald Faison also admit that they didn’t immediately get most of the now-famous slang in the film. Says Faison: “I had no idea what the hell I was saying. What the f— is a ‘Monet’? What’s ‘going postal’ mean? And when they explained to me what it meant, I thought, ‘That’s really messed up!’”
READ FULL STORY

This Week's Cover: Tina Fey on her career in comedy and saying goodbye to '30 Rock'

1227-cover-ew.jpg

After seven seasons, 10 Emmys, and countless catchphrases — Blerg! I want to go to there! High-fiving a million angels!30 Rock will wrap up its illustrious and delightfully bizarre run early next year. To help us cope with the loss, we sat down with Rock‘s creator and star, Tina Fey, for a wide-ranging EW Interview. (Click here to buy the issue.) We arrived on set just in time to witness a scene from the third episode of the final season (which premieres October 4 at 8 p.m. on NBC), in which Fey’s Liz Lemon is appalled to learn a shocking secret about Tracy Jordan (Tracy Morgan). Explains Fey, “I discover that Tracy Jordan has tweeted, “I agree @theRealStephenHawking. Women are just not funny — never have been, never will be. #plotpoint.” (We won’t ruin the outcome for you, but suffice it to say that the resolution involves Lemon dressed in a lab coat and declaring, “Don’t thank me — thank Roe v. Wade!”) READ FULL STORY

This Week's Cover: 'Homeland' tops our Fall TV Preview

1224-1225-EWCOVER.jpg

No matter whom you plan on voting for this November, there’s one thing we can all agree on about President Obama: He has excellent taste in TV. The POTUS told People Magazine in December that Homeland — Showtime’s terrorist thriller starring Claire Danes and Damian Lewis, who grace the cover of EW’s Fall TV Preview this week — is one of two can’t-miss dramas on the White House DVR list (the other being HBO’s Boardwalk Empire). “We tend to be stunned over and over again by the response of the show,” says executive producer Alex Gansa. “Then all of a sudden the President of the United States says he’s stealing time away from Michelle and the kids to watch Homeland. It was just unbelievable.” Adds Showtime President David Nevins, “That was when we had gone to another level.”

This week’s cover of EW (click here to buy the issue) goes behind the scenes of Homeland‘s much-anticipated second season (premiering Sept. 30 at 10pm), which will continue the dysfunctional cat-and-mouse-game between bipolar CIA agent Carrie Mathison (Danes) and soldier/terrorist Nicholas Brody (Lewis). The pressure is on for Showtime’s hit series to deliver another round of episodes worthy of its Emmy-nominated first season, which ended with a gripping cliffhanger (“Issa!”) and so many questions: Will Carrie’s memory return? How long can Brody fly under the radar? Can Carrie ever rejoin the CIA? “I think the reaction [to season 1] still feels outsized, and of course to me it only loads up the fear of the second season,” admits executive producer Howard Gordon. He jokes, “We say, ‘Take a deep breath and lower your expectations.’”

Also in the Fall TV Preview: EW TV critic Ken Tucker picks this season’s five best new shows (any guesses?), plus we’ve got the scoop on 104 returning and new shows, including: READ FULL STORY

This Week's Cover: An exclusive sneak peek at season 3 of 'The Walking Dead'

ewcover-1222-Andrew.jpg

If the sound you heard during the two first seasons of The Walking Dead was the persistent moaning of a hungry herd of flesh-eating ghouls, season 3 will bring an entirely new sound: the sound of two worlds colliding. That’s because Rick Grimes (Andrew Lincoln) and Co. will face a brand new threat when the AMC drama returns on Oct. 14 — and that threat is very much human. While Rick and the gang are busy clearing out a prison in the hopes of transforming it into a protective fortress, not so far away is the town of Woodbury, Ga., and it’s self-appointed leader, the Governor (David Morrissey).

Think these two communities can peacefully coexist in a post-apocalyptic world where safe havens and supplies are scarce? Think again.
READ FULL STORY

This Week's Cover: EW Celebrates 50 Years of James Bond -- plus Sam Mendes on 'Skyfall'

ew1219-cover

What is the most appropriate gift you could give Brit super spy and martini aficionado James Bond to celebrate 50 years of big screen 007 adventures? A cake in the shape of a gun? A gun in the shape of a cake? A new liver? Or…How about an entire issue of Entertainment Weekly devoted to the half century of espionage-themed pleasure the Bond franchise has given the world since Sean Connery defined the role of 007 — and Ursula Andress defined the ideal way to wear a bikini — in 1962′s Dr. No?

Within the pages of this week’s magazine you’ll find a gallery of rare, behind-the-scenes photographs annotated by longtime Bond producers Barbara Broccoli and Michael G. Wilson, a guide to all 22 official James Bond movies, a round-up of Bond’s greatest gadgets, a map revealing every place 007 has visited on planet earth (and elsewhere), an interview with “Unsung Bond” George Lazenby, and an opening essay by 007 nut Ben Svetkey who explains why his many Bond set visits on EW’s behalf were not just all expenses-paid boondoggles — they were all expense-paid boondoggles which helped make him the man he is today.

But, wait, there’s more! Having stirred you with tales of Bond movies past we will also hopefully shake you with fresh news about the latest 007 adventure Skyfall, which opens Nov. 9. That intel comes courtesy of the film’s Oscar-winning director Sam Mendes who emerged from his editing bunker to talk Daniel Craig hotness, Bond girl nudity, and the onscreen evil-osity of Javier Bardem’s villain.

Remember, though, folks: All this is for your eyes only!

For your complete guide to 50 Years of Bond, pick up the new issue of Entertainment Weekly, on stands Aug. 3.

Read more:
‘Skyfall’: ‘Mommy was very bad’ and other curious clues in the new James Bond trailer
‘Skyfall’ first look: Ben Whishaw is the new Q! — EXCLUSIVE
First ‘Skyfall’ teaser poster unveiled

This Week's Cover: Inside the Cult of 'Doctor Who' -- plus the 25 greatest cult TV shows from the past 25 years

1218-DRWHO-EWCOVER.jpg

How do you know when a TV show has become a cult phenomenon? When its (often comparatively small) ratings are eclipsed by the wild ardor of its fans. Take the case of the British science fiction show Doctor Who, whose current lead, Matt Smith, is this week’s cover star. The now 49-year-old Who is hugely popular in its homeland but has always enjoyed a more select appeal here — not that you know that from the devotion of U.S.-based “Whovians.” In 1983, 7,000 people attended a Doctor Who convention in Chicago and over the past couple of years the time-traveling “Doctor” has received a bordering-on-the-absurd number of onscreen shout-outs from Community, Criminal Minds, Craig Ferguson’s The Late Late Show, Supernatural, and Grey’s Anatomy, whose creator, Shonda Rhimes, describes herself as a “psychotic” follower of Matt Smith’s time travel adventures in this week’s cover story. “It’s not an obscure show anymore,” says executive producer Steven Moffat. “It’s not even a ‘British import.’ It’s just Doctor Who.”

Has the time finally come for the so-called “Time Lord” to break big in America? Could be. The Doctor Who team has assiduously courted fans here with a succession of publicity appearances, including a panel at this year’s Comic-Con where Whovians paid homage to Smith’s red-haired costar Karen Gillan by donning ginger wigs. (No. 2 way you know  a TV show has become a cult favorite? When fans start dressing as characters.) In June 2011, the show’s U.S. broadcaster BBC America enjoyed its best ever ratings with the premiere episode of the sixth season since Doctor Who was revived in 2005, following a 16 year hiatus. The new season, which debuts later this summer, may well be the most eagerly anticipated ever as the Doctor prepares to say goodbye to his two trusty and beloved-by-fans “companions,” Gillan’s Amy Pond and Arthur Darvill’s Rory Williams. In the cover story we track the ups and downs of the show’s remarkable half-century history and preview the new episodes with help from Smith, Gillan, Darvill, and  exec producer, Steven Moffat.

Want more awesome small screen weirdness? Then check out our list of the 25 Best Cult TV Shows From the Past 25 years, in which we explain the devotion shown to such culty whippersnappers (at least by Who standards) as Fringe, Twin Peaks, The Comeback, Archer, Community, Firefly, Arrested Development, and Buffy the Vampire Slayer. Click here to buy the new issue, on stands this Friday.

Entertainment Weekly is now available on most tablets, including the iPad, Nook Color, Kindle Fire, and Samsung Galaxy. Think of it like the EW you already love, but on steroids: With our digital magazine, you can buy the recommended movies, albums, books, and DVDs while you’re reading about them. Plus, you can watch music videos and film trailers, and find movie showtimes in your neighborhood. Current subscribers can access the digital version of EW for free by downloading the EW app (also free) and logging in using your name and address or the information on your subscription label. Single copies of the magazine are also for sale through the app if you prefer to read EW that way. If you’re not a subscriber, but would like to become one, you can do so by going to ew.com/allaccess.

This Week's Cover: Christian Bale and Christopher Nolan discuss the making and meaning of 'The Dark Knight Rises'

1216coverew-batman

Christopher Nolan is throwing down the gauntlet. “We want this to be the most exciting film, the most emotionally engaging and enjoyable blockbuster that an audience can see this summer,” says the director of The Dark Knight Rises, the third and final chapter in the Inception helmer’s trilogy of Batman movies starring Christian Bale. In advance of the film’s release on July 20, Nolan and Bale sat down with Entertainment Weekly for separate interviews to talk about the making of Rises and the remarkable success of their collaboration. The new issue of EW, on sale later this week, also features exclusive new photos from the film.

During a chat in his home office in Los Angeles, Nolan spoke of constructing the story for Rises with writers David S. Goyer and Jonathan Nolan and discussed how the edgy epic reflects “the things that worry us” about the world. But he dismissed the perception that the movie promotes a specific political agenda. “I don’t feel there’s a Left or Right perspective in the film,” he says. “What is there is just an honest assessment or honest exploration of the world we live in.” Nolan told EW that he’s satisfied with the threequel, which pits Gotham City’s caped crusader against two new villains: Selina Kyle, a.k.a. Catwoman (Anne Hathaway), a thief who preys on high society, and Bane (Tom Hardy), a fierce, secretive, and brilliant revolutionary. Michael Caine, Morgan Freeman and Gary Oldman are back, and Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Marion Cotillard join the cast. “I’m very happy with it. I know it’s the film I wanted to make. It does all the things I really hoped for,” says Nolan, who found inspiration in Fritz Lang’s Metropolis, David Lean’s Dr. Zhivago and Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner – plus Charles Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities – for his climactic opus. “I look what everyone has done in the film and I think they’ve done a very good job — and I think I’ve done a good job not obscuring it.”

Over a breakfast of carrot juice at an L.A. restaurant late last month, Bale told EW he’s both excited and overwhelmed by the imminent arrival of Rises’ pop culture moment. “It’s just begun, hasn’t it?” said the actor, noting the massive billboards outside the eatery. “These movies always start as small affairs, just me and Chris, sitting across a table, talking,” says Bale. “By this point, it starts to become this monster, just kind of roaring. For me, it’s kind of exciting, but don’t get too close, because it might devour you with its jaws.”

Not that Bale is anything less than grateful for the beast that’s been the Dark Knight. Before becoming Batman, Bale was frustrated by the lack of quality parts coming his way. Not anymore. Since Batman Begins, Bale has not only been a very busy actor, but one of Hollywood’s best. “[Batman] afforded me a change in my life. And it’s up to me to make a hash of that,” says Bale, who won an Oscar last year for his work in The Fighter. “Most actors desperately hope for work to come their way. Batman has given me the ability to say, ‘I don’t have to.’ I can choose, and choose wisely, and make the most of it.”

Related:
New ‘Dark Knight Rises’ TV spot: Doctor’s orders
‘Dark Knight Rises’ new IMAX poster

This Week's Cover: 'The Hobbit' -- plus our annual Comic-Con preview

1215-comiccon-ew-cover

Nearly a decade after the last of the Lord of the Rings trilogy hit theaters, it’s time to go back to Middle-earth. The Hobbit doesn’t come out until December, but in preparation for Comic-Con (July 12-15 in San Diego) we’ve got exclusive images and on-set scoops from the first of the two movies— An Unexpected Journey — including interviews with Martin Freeman (Bilbo Baggins), Ian McKellen (Gandalf), and director Peter Jackson.

To expand the classic J.R.R. Tolkien book so that it could support two feature films, Jackson drew from a range of Tolkien’s writings, adding characters not present in the Hobbit book, including Orlando Bloom’s elf Legolas and Cate Blachett’s elven ruler Galadriel. “In the movie we want these characters to have story lines and a little more substance than they do in the book,” Jackson explains. “Almost everything we’re doing is from Tolkien somewhere, whether it’s in the book or the subsequent development that wasn’t published in The Hobbit itself.”

Adds McKellen: “A lot of people weren’t even born when we were filming Lord of the Rings and only know the movies from watching them on DVD…. They’ll see Middle-earth on the big screen in The Hobbit, and I guarantee there will be a lot of minds blown wide apart.”

For even more on The Hobbit, as well as EW’s jam-packed guide to Comic-Con—including sneak peeks of Pacific Rim, Iron Man 3, The Walking Dead, and Arrow—pick up the new issue of Entertainment Weekly, on stands Tuesday, July 3.

This Week's Cover: Inside the Mind of Louis C.K.

In this week’s Entertainment Weekly, writer Melissa Maerz examines the inner world of Louis C.K., who’s quickly becoming everyone’s favorite comedian — though he wants to keep that reputation in check. Having racked up raves from Joan Rivers and Chris Rock for his painfully funny FX show, Louie, and earned more than a million dollars by selling his comedy special Live at the Beacon directly to fans through his website, he knows the backlash will come eventually. “It’s gross to be giantly famous,” he tells EW. “Anybody who’s a huge superstar is suffering. They’re garish and bloated. It’s like having a fever.”

So he’s invented an equation for finding the perfect amount of fame: “Comedians find their level. Then they get pushed down another 70 percent. Then they float back up to 75 percent. And that’s about where they belong.” READ FULL STORY

This Week's Cover: The New Art of Coming Out in Hollywood

EW1213-cover

In this week’s Entertainment Weekly special report cover story, writer Mark Harris examines the new, casual method gay celebrities are using to reveal their sexuality publicly for the first time. Fifteen years ago, when Ellen DeGeneres decided to come out of the closet, it was big news. Not just big: It was the cover of Time magazine, and a major story on OprahPrimetime Live, and CNN. Last month, another star of a popular TV comedy went public with his homosexuality. But the news that The Big Bang Theory’s Emmy-winner Jim Parsons is gay was reported with such matter-of-fact understatement that many people’s first reaction was a quick Google search to see if maybe he was out already and we’d all just failed to notice.

But sometimes big news arrives quietly. That new blink-and-you’ll-miss-it style is an important hallmark of changing times. READ FULL STORY

Latest Videos

Advertisement

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP