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Tag: This Week's Cover (61-70 of 251)

This Week's Cover: 'The Wolverine' tops your Summer Must List

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Does Hugh Jackman ever slow down? From what we can report, the answer is a definitive no way, mate. For the cover story of our annual Summer Must List issue, EW visited the actor last year on the Sydney set of The Wolverine (in theaters July 26), where Jackman jumped and leapt and charmed his way through a series of seemingly back-breaking stunts that he made look as easy as pie. That’s entertainment — and who embodies the power and pop of summer in the cinema better than Jackman? READ FULL STORY

This week's cover: Bruno Mars roars into summer!

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Locked out of heaven? Hardly. With two platinum albums, a string of No. 1 hits, and a massive tour on the horizon, Bruno Mars is set to have one hell of a summer.

For this week’s cover story, Mars invites Entertainment Weekly into his Hollywood home for a funny and frank conversation about everything from his upcoming single (“Treasure,” which he’ll debut at this weekend’s Billboard Music Awards) to why he’s totally looking forward to getting fat one day. READ FULL STORY

This week's cover: Guns! Cars! Biceps! Your guide to 'Fast & Furious'

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The day was June 22, 2001. George W. Bush was midway through the first year of his presidency. TNT had just reinvented itself with the slogan “We Know Drama.” Annoying suburban children across this country were thrilling to the pop-punk sounds of Blink-182’s latest album Take Off Your Pants and Jacket. And a movie called The Fast and the Furious was hitting theaters, opening the same weekend as Dr. Dolittle 2. It was teen-dreamboat Paul Walker’s first starring role. It more or less invented the idea of Vin Diesel, Action Star. And it launched one of the most surprising and durable franchises in modern Hollywood — which looks poised to have its biggest moment yet with Fast & Furious 6, opening Memorial Day. READ FULL STORY

This Week's Cover: 'Iron Man 3' plays rough with Marvel's top hero

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Watch out — she’s armed.

Robert Downey Jr. and Gwyneth Paltrow have been hoping to get Tony Stark’s ladylove Pepper Potts into some armor ever since the second Iron Man movie, fulfilling the character’s comic book evolution from the damsel in distress to the high-powered heroine known as Rescue. With Iron Man 3, it finally happens. “It’s sort of the comic-book version of a Cinderella story,” Paltrow says of her character’s four-film arc. “She starts timid and sort of cleaning up after Tony, and then she evolves into full strength and a superhero.”

But there’s a chance that her first time in the suit may also be her last …

In this week’s cover story, Entertainment Weekly explores a question that everyone who sees Iron Man 3 this weekend will be asking: Is this the end?

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This week's cover: Behind the scenes of the new 'Arrested Development'

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One month from now, all of your questions will be answered. What dysfunctional disasters have befallen our Bluths since we last saw them in 2006? Did Buster survive that last seal confrontation with his other hand intact? Is the stair car now a hybrid? (Probably not.) And, oh, yes, will the new Arrested Development episodes scratch that seven-year-wait of an itch?

But maybe you can’t wait another month. You need some answers now. So make yourself a breakfast of champions — vodka rocks and a piece of toast, perhaps — and check out this week’s issue of Entertainment Weekly, which celebrates AD with three collector’s covers (click through to see the rest) and fills you in on the revival of one of this century’s most beloved cult comedies. On May 26, Netflix will release 15 new episodes of Arrested all at once, and they are intended to serve as a set-up to that long-anticipated movie (which is not yet greenlighted). We spoke with all nine cast members as well as series creator/executive producer Mitchell Hurwitz about the surprisingly emotional reunion, what to expect from this batch of episodes, and more. “This year is about the enduring entanglements of family,” Hurwitz explains of the new season. “They are 10 years older than when we met, so that means emotionally they’re, like, two years older than we met them. Amazing things happen when one goes from being emotionally 12 years old to emotionally being 14 years old.” Or, as Will Arnett, a.k.a. misguided magician Gob, declares: “It’s the story of shame, cunning, thievery, dishonor, backstabbing, deceit, bold-faced lying, one-upmanship, psychological torture, lust, financial ruin, and magic, all supported by a very broad beam of dysfunctional love.” READ FULL STORY

This Week's Cover: Behind the soulful new 'Man of Steel'

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The makers of Man of Steel had to start thinking like a cadre of supervillains: how do you get under Superman’s invincible skin and really make him hurt?

This week’s cover story reveals how the new film (out June 14) attempts to humanize the superhuman by finding new flaws and vulnerabilities. The most common one, however, was off the table: “I’ll be honest with you, there’s no Kryptonite in the movie,” says director Zack Snyder (300, Watchmen) Those glowing green space rocks – Superman’s only crippling weakness – have turned up so often as a plot point in movies, the only fresh option was not to use it. Anyway, if you want to make an audience relate to a character, a galactic allergy isn’t the way to do it.

Henry Cavill (Immortals), the latest star to wear the red cape, instead plays a Superman who isn’t fully comfortable with that god-like title. This film reveals that even on Krypton, young Kal-El was a special child, whose birth was cause for alarm on his home planet. (More on that in the magazine) And once on Earth, his adoptive parents, Ma and Pa Kent (Kevin Costner and Diane Lane), urge him not to use his immense strength – even in dire emergencies — warning that not every human would be as accepting of him as they are. So Clark Kent grows up feeling isolated, longing for a connection to others, and constantly hiding who he is. As a result, Man of Steel presents the frustrated Superman, the angry Superman, the lost Superman. “Although he is not susceptible to the frailties of mankind, he is definitely susceptible to the emotional frailties,” Cavill says.

That’s just the set-up. Once the Kryptonian villain General Zod (Boardwalk Empire’s Michael Shannon) arrives to threaten the Earth, eventually the passionate Superman steps forward, too. It helps that he has a reason to care about the home he’s defending, and we can all thank Amy Adams’ Lois Lane for that. “I think she’s very transient. She’s ready to pick up and go at a moment’s notice,” Adams says of the hard-bitten journalist. “I think that definitely could be part of what she sees in Superman — not really laying down roots, not developing trust.”

Based on footage EW has seen, the film (which was directed by Zack Snyder and shepherded by Christopher Nolan) has plenty of building-smashing, train-slinging, heat-vision-blasting battles to cut through the emotional heaviness. “You want to give the audience great spectacle. You want them to go to the movie, be eating their popcorn and be like, ‘Wow!’” says Man of Steel producer Charles Roven, who also worked on The Dark Knight trilogy. “But it’s just not good enough to give them the ‘Wow.’ You want them to be emotionally engaged. Because if you just have the ‘wow,’ ultimately you get bludgeoned by that and you stop caring.”

Those who’ve long felt the super-confident, super-controlled Superman has gotten super dull may be glad to see him finally challenged in ways that go beyond bullets bouncing off of his chest.

inthisissue0410For more on Man of Steel and 108 other summer movies — including Johnny Depp’s views on playing The Lone Ranger‘s Tonto (“He’s damaged. He’s just looking to get back on track”), Jennifer Aniston’s prep work for the comedy We’re the Millers (“This fabulous dance instructor just pulled the inner stripper out of me,”), and Sandra Bullock’s first impressions of working with Melissa McCarthy and director Paul Feig on The Heat (“The first week I was like, ‘What the hell is going on here?'”)  — pick up the new issue of Entertainment Weekly, on stands April 12th.

This week's cover: Crazy in love with 'Scandal'

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Olivia Pope (Kerry Washington) and her astute band of associates specialize in solving problems — from the outrageous and illicit to the shocking and salacious. But we — and millions of weekly viewers — find ourselves with one problem that even they can’t fix: We’re addicted to Scandal. This week’s issue of Entertainment Weekly goes behind the scenes of television’s sexiest drama for a journey through its rise to a show that has taken over our TVs — and Twitter feeds — thanks in part to the forbidden romance between Pope and President Fitzgerald Grant (Tony Goldwyn). “I feel like The West Wing brought us Washington as we’d all want it to be,” explains Scandal creator Shonda Rhimes. “And this show brings us Washington as we hope it would never be.”

And that, of course, is what makes ABC’s Scandal such a fun, live-tweet-every-oh-my-God–moment viewing experience. Every Thursday between 10 and 11 p.m., hordes of fans gather online to do just that: The show has averaged more than 220,000 tweets per episode since January, according to SocialGuide; some of these fans include Oprah Winfrey, Lena Dunham, and Mary J. Blige. “Bill Clinton was another person where I was like, ‘What?! You watch Scandal?!'” Washington says. “I feel like it happens at least once a week — that I am totally floored by somebody who watches the show.”
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This week's cover: Brad Pitt's epic struggle to make 'World War Z'

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Nobody ever said making the most expensive zombie movie of all time would be easy. For Brad Pitt and the filmmakers behind the upcoming thriller World War Z, it certainly hasn’t been. This week’s issue of EW takes you inside the tumultuous production of the blockbuster hopeful, which has involved reshoots, re-writes, and a budget that has ballooned from $125 million to over $170 million. “These movies are very intricate puzzles, and you have to keep winding the mechanisms,” Pitt says, while on the Paramount lot. READ FULL STORY

This Week's Cover: Celebrating 50 years of 'Doctor Who'

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What is it with legendary British pop culture icons celebrating their fiftieth anniversaries? Who knows — and “Who” is exactly the right word. In 2012 both the Rolling Stones and the Bond movies turned 50 and this year it is the turn of British science fiction show Doctor Who (yes, we know the Doctor is actually much older than 50, but let’s not get into that right now). To mark the occasion, this week’s issue of Entertainment Weekly offers a choice of two collectible covers — one featuring Matt Smith’s Doctor, Jenna Louise-Coleman’s new “companion” Clara, and a Dalek and the other boasting Smith and a Cyberman, who will be among the monsters our time-traveling hero battles in the half-season of eight new Doctor Who shows which BBC America will premiere on March 30 at 8p.m. ET.

That, however, is just the tip of the celebratory Who-berg — the flashing light atop the Doctor’s time- and spacecraft the TARDIS, if you will. For our Doctor Who cover story we visited the show on location in Wales, grilled executive producer Steven Moffat about the upcoming episodes and the 50th anniversary special, which is being broadcast this fall, and luncheoned in Manhattan with Smith. In our Who package you’ll also find a breakdown of all 11 Doctors and, perhaps best of all, an essay by Peter Jackson in which the Lord of the Rings director recounts his Who-love and announces his price for directing an episode. You’ll think the magazine is, well, bigger on the inside…
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This Week's Cover: 'Game of Thrones' wildest season yet!

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You may think you know how brutal HBO’s beautiful dark twisted fantasy Game of Thrones can get, but to paraphrase Wildling temptress Ygritte: “You know nothing about season 3.” Based on roughly the first half of the third novel in George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire series, the fan-favorite A Storm of Swords, this season continues the ultra-complex story of rival families vying for power in a fantasy kingdom where winter and summer last for years. It includes some of the most rousing jump-off-the-couch moments of triumph in the saga’s five-books-and-counting history — as well as its most bloody casualties. In geek terms: It’s The Empire Strikes Back of the Thrones-verse. “Emotionally, this season really goes for the jugular,” Thrones executive story editor Bryan Cogman tells Entertainment Weekly in this week’s issue. “In some cases, quite literally.”

The emotional ramp-up couldn’t happen at a better time. Game of Thrones is bigger than ever, and about to get bigger still. Last year viewership climbed to rank as HBO’s third most-popular show of all time, averaging 11.6 million viewers weekly across all the company’s platforms. With season 2’s DVD release breaking the network’s sales records last month, it’s a safe bet that Thrones viewership will soon catapult to even greater heights. But will season 3 also be the best one so far, as fans dearly hope?

Showrunners David Benioff and Dan Weiss are reluctant to raise expectations any higher, but are optimistic. “Like the book, it builds,” Benioff says. “Once the season kicks into gear, we’ve already seen stuff that makes me think it will be the best one yet. And it ought to be.” While season 2 poured a disproportionate amount of resources into the final couple hours, this round has major moments throughout; a “hammering propulsion,” as Weiss puts it. “There’s major massive events happening like I don’t think we’ve ever had before,” Weiss says. One particular “Scene Which Shall Not Be Named,” as Benioff called it, left the Thrones team devastated. “I’ve never seen the crew so emotional,” Benioff says. “If the scene has that effect on the people making it who know what’s coming, if they’re that overpowered, I think it’s going to have an overwhelming effect on people watching it.” READ FULL STORY

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