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Tag: This Week's Cover (31-40 of 257)

This week's cover: Getting ready for 'Divergent'

Not every movie adapted from a popular Young Adult novel is necessarily a guaranteed hit. For every Twilight or Hunger Games, there are plenty of others that didn’t manage to reach the same heights. (Think: Beautiful Creatures, Mortal Instruments: City of Bones, and Vampire Academy, for example.)

This week’s cover story takes a close look at Divergent — based on the best-selling series by Veronica Roth and in theaters March 21 — starring Shailene Woodley and Theo James and directed by Neil Burger (Limitless). The pressure is on for this film to soothe the jangled nerves of a jittery industry that is watching the film closely, in hopes that it will be the one to continue the wave of YA hits. EW’s Sara Vilkomerson spoke to the filmmakers and actors about what it’s like to have such high expectations on their shoulders, and, for the stars, how they answer the constant question about whether they are ready for fame. “It’s completely impossible to answer,” Theo James says. “If you say anything, you sound like a douche bag because who knows what the f— is going to happen?” (His co-star agrees. “It’s something that hasn’t happened yet,” says Woodley. “Anyway, change is inevitable. It happens every day. I’m not going to change my life at all — I love the way I live. I’m not going to worry about it.”) READ FULL STORY

This Week's Cover: Oscar front-runners Cate Blanchett and Lupita Nyong'o sit for candid chat

We’re in the final stretch of this year’s Oscar season, and Entertainment Weekly‘s latest issue is here to bring you all you need to know before the big night.

This week’s cover story features a sit-down with two Oscar hopefuls — the veteran Cate Blanchett (the front-runner in the lead actress category for her role as a fallen socialite in Blue Jasmine) and the newcomer Lupita Nyong’o (a lead contender in the supporting actress race for scene-stealing part as Patsey in 12 Years a Slave). The two discuss the never-ending award season, what they love most about their jobs and their hopes for the future.

Blanchett, who has spent the past six years running a theater company in her hometown of Sydney, Australia, discusses her fraught relationship with her chosen profession. “I’m constantly running away from acting,” she says. “I have to get seduced back into it each time.” READ FULL STORY

This Week's Cover: 'Veronica Mars' lives!

A long time ago, we used to be friends with a whip-smart teen sleuth named Veronica Mars. And now, thanks to a historic Kickstarter campaign, Mars is back in Neptune — this time on the big screen. In this week’s cover story, star Kristen Bell and creator Rob Thomas take EW along for the roller-coaster revival of the beloved cult TV series. Just a year ago, a big-screen revival of Veronica Mars was still a pipe dream. But after a groundbreaking and breakneck turn of events, on March 14 it will be a dream come true for tens of thousands of fans that made it come true by donating $5.7 million last spring to a Kickstarter campaign — organized by Mars creator Rob Thomas — to finance the revival they’ve wanted since The CW canceled the series in 2007. Even Veronica is pinching herself. “Never before have we had a platform that allows people to engage us and tell us what they want,” Kristen Bell told EW when we visited the set of the movie last summer. “We said, ‘Guys! Maybe we’re crazy, but we really want to do it again. Do you?’ And they answered!” Adds Thomas, “We’re guinea pigs for a whole new model of filmmaking. It would be nice to be a success.” READ FULL STORY

This Week's Cover: The life and legacy of Philip Seymour Hoffman

The sudden death by apparent overdose of actor Philip Seymour Hoffman stunned Hollywood and left his family, friends, and colleagues shattered. In this week’s cover story, EW pays tribute to Hoffman, widely considered the greatest screen and stage actor of his generation.

Film critic Owen Gleiberman traces the arc of the Oscar-winning actor’s tragically curtailed career, exploring his ability, in role after role, to plumb his own depths to bring often deeply flawed characters to vivid life and to “lay bare the things that make people tick” — an emotionally wrenching process that clearly took a personal toll on the actor. We look back at Hoffman’s 10 most essential film performances — including his acclaimed work in movies like Capote, Doubt, and Boogie Nights, as well as lesser-known gems from throughout his career — and look ahead to the various projects he was working on at the time of his death, including the final installments in the Hunger Games franchise.

Director Brett Ratner, a fellow NYU film school student of Hoffman’s who later worked with the actor on the film Red Dragon, contributes a personal remembrance, while other friends and fellow actors and filmmakers offer their own tributes to Hoffman as both an artist and a man. “He was the warmest, most generous person and just overflowing with love and affection for his friends and family,” says actor Todd Louiso, a longtime friend of Hoffman’s who directed him in the 2002 film Love Liza. “I know the past two years have been really rough for him. To find out [about his death] doesn’t really compute to me. It just shows how strong that disease [of addiction] is.”

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This issue of Entertainment Weekly is on stands Friday.

This Week's Cover: The Oscars! Your ultimate insider guide to the races for Best Picture, Best Actor, and more

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Will it be 12 Years a Slave, Gravity, or American Hustle? That’s the question even Oscar voters are asking themselves as the most contentious race in years gets underway. The nominations announcement set the field, but in a year of snubs for Robert Redford, Oprah Winfrey, Emma Thompson, and Tom Hanks (twice), anything can happen — and probably will.

It’s a year of  first-timers, second chances — and a three-way battle for Best Picture
READ FULL STORY

This Week's Cover: Mad about 'Sherlock'

What will fans of British detective shows, Benedict Cumberbatch, and/or super-cool long overcoats be doing this weekend? Why, that’s easy to deduce: They’ll be watching Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman play Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson in the long-awaited season 3 premiere of Sherlock, the updated revamp of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s iconic sleuthing tales which debuts on PBS’s Masterpiece this coming Sunday.

It’s been almost two years since the show was last on the air — which is a long time for fans to ponder just how Sherlock survived his seemingly fatal fall from a hospital roof in the season 2 finale. To mark Holmes’ return to our screens, EW visited with the Sherlock crew in London for a cover story that delves deep into this global phenomenon. Producer Sue Vertue reveals that Cumberbatch did not get the role because of his looks — “When we first cast him, people were saying, ‘You promised us a sexy one!’” — while Freeman reveals that he almost didn’t get cast as Watson at all. The show’s stars and creators preview season 3 which will first reunite our two heroes and find Holmes acting as best man at Watson’s wedding. “It’s going to hit people where they live,” says Freeman of the episode. Cumberbatch, meanwhile, discusses the season’s “chilling” new villain Charles Augustus Magnussen (Lars Mikkelsen), and says he’s completely game to do more Sherlock after this season. Speaking of which, cocreator Steve Moffat tells EW that he and fellow Sherlock overlord Mark Gatiss already know what they want to do for season four. “We’re really excited about where we’re going with it,” says Moffat, who also talks about the future of his other show Doctor Who.
READ FULL STORY

This Week's Cover: David Fincher shoots 'Gone Girl' EW cover with Ben Affleck

When Entertainment Weekly approached Twentieth Century Fox about getting an exclusive inside look at the making of Gone Girl, an adaptation of Gillian Flynn’s 2012 smash best-selling novel due in theaters Oct. 3, the studio came back with a surprising reply: Director David Fincher was offering to shoot the cover himself. Not being crazy enough to turn down the Oscar-nominated provocateur who directed The Social Network, we said yes. Fincher dreamed up the image, which features Ben Affleck as Nick Dunne curled around his wife, Amy, played by Rosamund Pike. The result is an unsettling portrait of love gone demented. READ FULL STORY

This Week's Cover: 'Downton Abbey' keeps our Winter TV Preview classy

It’s the biggest PBS phenomenon since Sesame Street, and might very well be the classiest thing you do every Sunday night. Yes, Downton Abbey is returning on Jan. 5, and Entertainment Weekly was on the set for season four of the British TV phenomenon. Creator Julian Fellowes’ wildly popular period drama about life on a decadent English countryside estate shocked viewers last season with two major character deaths (we’ll never forget you, Matthew and Sybil!), and the show’s anticipated fourth season promises to be nothing short of shocking, exciting, and traumatic — which is just what we’ve come to expect of the Grantham and Crawley clan. Even guest star Shirley MacLaine was floored by the show’s drama: “When Matthew died I nearly threw a chair at the television. I thought, what is Julian Fellowes doing? It took me a few days to get over it.” READ FULL STORY

This week's cover: The Best and Worst of 2013

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We know you’re excited to watch the ball drop and ring in the new year, but you wouldn’t want to say goodbye to 2013 without first reviewing pop culture’s high points (Gravity! Orange is the New Black!), low points (Big Brother, What Would Ryan Lochte Do?), and, uh, divisive points (pretty much anything involving Miley Cyrus and/or the word “twerk”), would you? Of course not!

EW’s annual Best and Worst issue remembers the most delectable and most cringe-worthy entertainment moments of the year — and highlights the performances that stood above the rest. A small sample? James Spader on The Blacklist, Cecily Strong on SNL, Chiwetel Ejiofor in 12 Years a Slave, Amy Adams in American Hustle, Beyonce at the Super Bowl, and even James Franco in Spring Breakers. (Yep, we said it.)
READ FULL STORY

Tina Fey and Amy Poehler tackle 2013's biggest pop culture topics, make bold predictions for 2014

This week’s issue of EW is going to feature a lot of T & A.

That’s Tina Fey and Amy Poehler, you sickos. The two women, who will host the Golden Globes next month for the second year in a row, accepted a one-week job to become guest editors of EW. What does that mean, you ask? It means they wrote the Must List and Bullseye, assigned several stories and ran down the hallway screaming things like, “Orphan Black is the new Orange is the New Black!” and “Change all fonts to Comic Sans at once!” Of course, if you’re going to run a national entertainment magazine, you need to have a stunning command of the pop culture landscape. Which is why we asked the pair for their thoughts on how to cover some of 2013′s biggest pop culture topics. READ FULL STORY

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