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Tag: This Week's Cover (31-40 of 214)

'Elysium' inspired by director Neill Blomkamp's arrest in Mexico -- EXCLUSIVE

The new sci-fi action movie Elysium, directed by Neill Blomkamp (District 9) and starring Matt Damon and Jodie Foster, is about a future Earth that is entirely third world, and a first-world sky satellite where the rich live in paradise. The inspiration? An ill-fated trip to Tijuana, Mexico. 
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This Week's Cover: Matt Damon, Jodie Foster, and the making of 'Elysium'

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Matt Damon may be at the top of the A-list, but he had to persuade writer-director Neill Blomkamp (District 9) to cast him in his new sci-fi film, Elysium, opening Aug. 9. “I think he was even reluctant to meet me,” Damon says, laughing, from his apartment in Manhattan. “He kept saying, ‘I’m not doing anything Hollywood,’ and I was like, ‘Dude, I live in New York.’ We ended up meeting in a diner and he was kind of giving me the one-eye for the first 10 minutes or so.” That wasn’t just in Damon’s head. “I was doing that,” Blomkamp says, smiling. “I was just trying to figure out what was going on, you know?” READ FULL STORY

This Week's Cover: An exclusive sneak peek at season 4 of 'The Walking Dead'

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The zombies are back! Okay, to be fair, they never really left. But after a season in which the survivors on The Walking Dead were more concerned with the human threat of the Governor than the flesh-eaters right outside their prison gates, the biters will be taking center stage again when the AMC hit returns in mid-October for season 4. “The first episode, we had days where there were 150 walkers,” brags exec producer and zombie makeup guru Greg Nicotero.

But while herds of zombies may be attacking from the outside, there will also be a mysterious menace to deal with from the inside. What is it, and how will the prison gang defend themselves against it? “The new threat is something you can’t just stab in the face,” says new showrunner Scott M. Gimple. “You can’t talk sense to it. You can’t make a truce with it. It’s beyond all that. It would be a threat in any world, but in this world it is much more terrifying.” Yikes!
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This Week's Cover: The 100 All-Time Greatest... everything!

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Every week, Entertainment Weekly gives you tips on the latest, greatest ways to spend your limited time and money. With our new special issue, The 100 All-Time Greatest, we take on nothing short of entertainment history. This is a keepsake issue to inspire (and, yes, enrage) you for a long time to come. You’ll find the 100 best movies, TV shows, albums and novels ever, as well as the 50 greatest plays of the last 100 years and more.

We decided early on not to react to anybody else’s list — and not to try to make “statements” we didn’t really believe in. If we decided that Casablanca was the best movie of all time, then it would be number 1, whether or not people had said it before. By the way, Casablanca is NOT the best movie of all time, but it comes in at a still-impressive No. 3 on our list.
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This Week's Cover: A first look at the making of 'Divergent'

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Looking for the next YA movie sensation? This week, EW offers an exclusive first look at the making of Divergent, based on Veronica Roth’s dystopian YA best-seller. The movie’s set in a futuristic Chicago, and stars one of Hollywood’s fastest-rising young actresses, Shailene Woodley (The Descendants), who’s also snagged the Mary Jane role in the Amazing Spider-Man franchise and the lead in the adaptation of another beloved bestseller, The Fault in Our Stars. As one of her costars, Jai Courtney, puts it, “She’s going to be such a big f - - -ing star.”

In the future world of Divergent, society is divided into five factions devoted to particular virtues. But Woodley’s character, Beatrice, is classified as “divergent.” That means she’s suited for more than one faction and, as we later learn, headed for trouble. Beatrice finds an ally — and a love interest — in an instructor named Four, played by Theo James. (You may remember him dying in Lady Mary’s bed in season one of Downton Abbey). On the set, Woodley seemed delighted to find that James also took the possibility of superstardom with a grain of salt. “We’re not into the industry and have separate lives outside of it,” she told EW. “That’s refreshing. I don’t know what I would do if Four was played by someone who cared what he looked like or spent more time in front of the mirror than I do.”
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This Week's Cover: Superman at 75

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Time really does fly.

For three-quarters of a century, Superman has been fighting the good fight, keeping Earth and its inhabitants safe from all manner of villainy and disaster. As the DC Comics character turns 75, he’s also getting a major big-screen relaunch in director Zack Snyder’s Man of Steel, opening Friday.

So for this week’s cover, Entertainment Weekly is taking a look back at all the critical moments in Superman’s evolution from dimestore hero to American pop-culture icon. We start with his first appearance in 1938′s Action Comics #1, and track him along every major step (and occasional misstep) up through his reemergence in the form of Man of Steel‘s angry, passionate, lost Superman, as played by Henry Cavill.

Here’s what you can find in EW’s obsessive history of the man in the red cape:

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This Week's Cover: 'Dexter,' the killer final season

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The final season of one of the most successful and acclaimed cable dramas in TV history is coming this summer and EW has the behind-the-scenes scoop. The eighth and last outing of Showtime’s Dexter will take the Morgan siblings to darker places than ever before, as congenial serial killer Dexter (Michael C. Hall) and his now-estranged sister Debra (Jennifer Carpenter) strive to recover from last season’s shocking cliff-hanger where Deb killed their Miami Metro captain to keep her brother’s secret safe.

Unlike on some shows where writers decide an ending when working on the final season, Dexter’s fate arc has been planned for years, and producers are unusually confident their show will have an ending will satisfy fans. “It feels like the exact ending we should be doing,” says showrunner Scott Buck. “Ideally it will make our audience sit back and see Dexter a little more clearly than before. It should absolutely make sense to everybody watching it.”
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This week's cover: Guns! Cars! Biceps! Your guide to 'Fast & Furious'

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The day was June 22, 2001. George W. Bush was midway through the first year of his presidency. TNT had just reinvented itself with the slogan “We Know Drama.” Annoying suburban children across this country were thrilling to the pop-punk sounds of Blink-182′s latest album Take Off Your Pants and Jacket. And a movie called The Fast and the Furious was hitting theaters, opening the same weekend as Dr. Dolittle 2. It was teen-dreamboat Paul Walker’s first starring role. It more or less invented the idea of Vin Diesel, Action Star. And it launched one of the most surprising and durable franchises in modern Hollywood — which looks poised to have its biggest moment yet with Fast & Furious 6, opening Memorial Day. READ FULL STORY

This Week's Cover: 'Iron Man 3' plays rough with Marvel's top hero

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Watch out — she’s armed.

Robert Downey Jr. and Gwyneth Paltrow have been hoping to get Tony Stark’s ladylove Pepper Potts into some armor ever since the second Iron Man movie, fulfilling the character’s comic book evolution from the damsel in distress to the high-powered heroine known as Rescue. With Iron Man 3, it finally happens. “It’s sort of the comic-book version of a Cinderella story,” Paltrow says of her character’s four-film arc. “She starts timid and sort of cleaning up after Tony, and then she evolves into full strength and a superhero.”

But there’s a chance that her first time in the suit may also be her last …

In this week’s cover story, Entertainment Weekly explores a question that everyone who sees Iron Man 3 this weekend will be asking: Is this the end?

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This Week's Cover: Behind the soulful new 'Man of Steel'

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The makers of Man of Steel had to start thinking like a cadre of supervillains: how do you get under Superman’s invincible skin and really make him hurt?

This week’s cover story reveals how the new film (out June 14) attempts to humanize the superhuman by finding new flaws and vulnerabilities. The most common one, however, was off the table: “I’ll be honest with you, there’s no Kryptonite in the movie,” says director Zack Snyder (300, Watchmen) Those glowing green space rocks – Superman’s only crippling weakness – have turned up so often as a plot point in movies, the only fresh option was not to use it. Anyway, if you want to make an audience relate to a character, a galactic allergy isn’t the way to do it.

Henry Cavill (Immortals), the latest star to wear the red cape, instead plays a Superman who isn’t fully comfortable with that god-like title. This film reveals that even on Krypton, young Kal-El was a special child, whose birth was cause for alarm on his home planet. (More on that in the magazine) And once on Earth, his adoptive parents, Ma and Pa Kent (Kevin Costner and Diane Lane), urge him not to use his immense strength – even in dire emergencies — warning that not every human would be as accepting of him as they are. So Clark Kent grows up feeling isolated, longing for a connection to others, and constantly hiding who he is. As a result, Man of Steel presents the frustrated Superman, the angry Superman, the lost Superman. “Although he is not susceptible to the frailties of mankind, he is definitely susceptible to the emotional frailties,” Cavill says.

That’s just the set-up. Once the Kryptonian villain General Zod (Boardwalk Empire’s Michael Shannon) arrives to threaten the Earth, eventually the passionate Superman steps forward, too. It helps that he has a reason to care about the home he’s defending, and we can all thank Amy Adams’ Lois Lane for that. “I think she’s very transient. She’s ready to pick up and go at a moment’s notice,” Adams says of the hard-bitten journalist. “I think that definitely could be part of what she sees in Superman — not really laying down roots, not developing trust.”

Based on footage EW has seen, the film (which was directed by Zack Snyder and shepherded by Christopher Nolan) has plenty of building-smashing, train-slinging, heat-vision-blasting battles to cut through the emotional heaviness. “You want to give the audience great spectacle. You want them to go to the movie, be eating their popcorn and be like, ‘Wow!’” says Man of Steel producer Charles Roven, who also worked on The Dark Knight trilogy. “But it’s just not good enough to give them the ‘Wow.’ You want them to be emotionally engaged. Because if you just have the ‘wow,’ ultimately you get bludgeoned by that and you stop caring.”

Those who’ve long felt the super-confident, super-controlled Superman has gotten super dull may be glad to see him finally challenged in ways that go beyond bullets bouncing off of his chest.

inthisissue0410For more on Man of Steel and 108 other summer movies — including Johnny Depp’s views on playing The Lone Ranger‘s Tonto (“He’s damaged. He’s just looking to get back on track”), Jennifer Aniston’s prep work for the comedy We’re the Millers (“This fabulous dance instructor just pulled the inner stripper out of me,”), and Sandra Bullock’s first impressions of working with Melissa McCarthy and director Paul Feig on The Heat (“The first week I was like, ‘What the hell is going on here?’”)  — pick up the new issue of Entertainment Weekly, on stands April 12th.

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