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Tag: This Week's Cover (1-10 of 224)

This week's cover: Meet the new boss in Marvel's 'Avengers: Age of Ultron'

If you’re part of a group that has already saved the world nine times, eventually you can’t help but wonder: Isn’t it somebody else’s turn?

Unfortunately, that kind of thinking directly leads to the latest global threat in Avengers: Age of Ultron, and Entertainment Weekly‘s Comic-Con 2014 preview gives you an exclusive First Look at the big, bad robot causing all the grief in next summer’s superhero team-up.

READ FULL STORY

This week's cover: Halle Berry lands on 'Extant'

Cop shows, doctor shows, courtroom-based dramas–for years, Halle Berry had heard pitches for just about every iteration of what’s already on TV. Nothing seemed invigorating enough for her to briefly abandon a still-thriving film career. Then, in the fall of 2013, a spec script called Extant started a feeding frenzy in Hollywood, with just about every major TV player–ABC, FX, Netflix, you name it–trying to buy the sci-fi thriller. As soon as CBS prevailed, CBS Entertainment Chairman Nina Tasser knew exactly who she wanted to play Molly Woods, an astronaut who returns from a year-long solo mission in space with a baby (possibly alien in origin) in her belly. READ FULL STORY

This Week's Cover: Inside the crazy, sexy final season of 'True Blood'

Viewers will need to savor these last few drops of Blood. In just a few weeks, production will wrap for good on HBO’s True Blood after seven ­seasons (the final batch of episodes begin Sunday at 9 p.m.). In the most ­basic terms, the show — based on the Sookie Stackhouse series by Charlaine Harris and created for TV by Alan Ball (Six Feet Under) — follows half-faerie waitress Sookie (Anna Paquin) and her relationship with gentlemanly vampire Bill (Stephen Moyer). But there have been detours into witches, werewolves, orgies, and one really nasty meat tree.

Blood has been a huge hit for HBO, ­averaging 11.4 million viewers a ­summer, but for Paquin and Moyer it’s been life-changing. The pair met filming the ­series, married in 2010, and had twins, Charlie and Poppy, in 2012. Says Paquin, “Because it has lasted ­seven years and because of the relationships, not just between us but the way they all evolved as a family, it’s been extraordinary to have that experience that is completely life-changing in all of the best possible ways — and with the person you want to spend the rest of your life with. We will always have this.”

For this week’s cover, EW sat down with Paquin and Moyer at Bellefleur’s, in the very booth where Bill first saw Sookie, for a revealing (take a glance at that cover!) look back at their bloody good time in Bon Temps. Here’s a brief tease: READ FULL STORY

This week's cover: Jonah Hill and Channing Tatum get bromantic for '22 Jump Street'

JH + CT 4EVA.

Jonah Hill and Channing Tatum are perfect for each other — anyone can see that. The stars of 22 Jump Street may be going back to school this Friday, but they have a kind of chemistry that can’t be taught. “If I wasn’t with my wife and Jonah had lady parts,” says Tatum, “I would probably ask him out.”

In this week’s Entertainment Weekly, Hill and Tatum discuss their new movie, a sequel so self-aware it’s practically sentient, and  trade jokes, compliments, and insults like one of those couples who finish each other’s sentences and french fries. “We are a quote-unquote odd couple,” says Hill. “That dynamic is true of our relationship on screen and off screen. We are incredibly different, we come from incredibly different worlds, and it is a yin and yang thing.” READ FULL STORY

This Week's Cover: 'Masters of Sex' sizzles in our Summer TV Preview

One of the summer’s smartest and sudsiest shows also happens to have the steamiest title. Showtime’s Masters of Sex makes a red-hot return to your TV this July with its scandalous second season, and Entertainment Weekly has the scoop on who’s in (Sarah Silverman!), who’s out (Allison Janney!), and what’s to come in Michael Sheen and Lizzy Caplan’s sophomore year as sexologists Bill Masters and Virginia Johnson.

“One of the things that’s exciting about our show — daunting but exciting — is that every year is going to look pretty different,” teases showrunner Michelle Ashford. “Bill and Virginia’s careers changed and they went from total obscurity to the front of Time magazine. The sexual revolution was exploding, and Masters and Johnson were a huge part of that.” Season 2 picks up immediately after a newly unemployed Bill showed up on Virginia’s doorstop with a desperate declaration of love, and viewers will get a taste of our favorite sex researchers taking their academic relationship out of the lab and into the bedroom. READ FULL STORY

This week's cover: Jessica Alba takes a dip in our Summer Must List issue

It’s summertime, when the pop-culture mercury starts to boil. Three months of big-name blockbusters, new TV, music festivals, and more await us, which is why we’ve gone ahead and stuffed all the season’s best stuff into this week’s Summer Must List issue.

And who better to heat up its cover than Jessica Alba, the midriff-baring star of Frank Miller’s Sin City: A Dame to Kill For. Alba returns as lasso-swinging stripper Nancy Callahan in the hyper-violent, hyper-sexy, hyper-everything sequel to 2005’s live-action comic book, co-directed once more by Robert Rodriguez and Frank Miller. But this time, Alba’s character has a little more bite. “She was more naive in the first film. Ignorance was bliss,” Alba says. “In this one there’s no bliss and no ignorance. I wanted her to transition from being a victim to being someone who’s in control of her own story.” READ FULL STORY

This Week's Cover: The emotional journey to 'The Normal Heart'

It’s taken 30 years for Larry Kramer’s incendiary play The Normal Heart to make it to the screen. Heart, which premiered in 1985 and had a 2011 Tony-­winning revival on Broadway, is one of the first literary works to tackle the AIDS crisis and boldly criticize the lack of government ­support to fight the disease. In this week’s EW cover story, the cast and crew talk about the challenges of bringing Heart to life, the transformative production, and their hopes for the film’s legacy.

Despite involvement from names like Barbra Streisand, who owned the rights for 10 years, The Normal Heart appeared to be destined for only theater until Glee co-creator Ryan Murphy acquired the rights in 2009 with his own money. “I really believed in it,” explains Murphy, who first read the play in college and directed the film version. “Larry set a very high price. I gulped and said, ‘Okay,’ and bought it. I think he wanted to see, ‘Is this kid serious?’ And I was.” Kramer, who’s HIV-positive and currently recovering from unrelated medical complications, was unable to speak to EW but emailed that Heart made it to the screen “because of Ryan Murphy caring passionately about getting it made, abetted by [exec producer] Dante Di Loreto.” READ FULL STORY

This Week's Cover: 'The Fault in Our Stars' could be this summer's must-see romance

Forget — for just a moment — about summer’s spandex-clad superheroes and cities being destroyed by robots and monsters. The Fault in Our Stars, out June 6 and adapted from the 2012 best-selling John Green novel, stands to be the must-see love story of the season.

In this week’s Entertainment Weekly, Sara Vilkomerson reports from The Fault in Our Stars set in Pittsburgh and explores how TFIOS — which tells the love story of two teenagers who meet in a cancer support group — became an unlikely YA phenomenon. “I tried to write the funniest, most honest love story I could about these kids who were living with a difficult disease. I never thought it would be popular,” says Green. “I certainly never imagined it would be a movie.” READ FULL STORY

This week's cover: 'Orange Is the New Black' scores a big (prison) break

The ladies of Litchfield are back — and they’re ready for you to binge! After the first season of Netflix’s prison dramedy Orange Is the New Black premiered last July and became the network’s most-viewed original series debut, audiences clamored for more from the fascinating women of different shapes, sizes, races, socioeconomic classes, and sexualities who shared just one thing: They’re all behind bars.

In this week’s Entertainment Weekly, Jessica Shaw goes deep into the trenches on the show’s Queens, New York, set to get the lowdown from the inmates themselves. Series creator Jenji Kohan promises there are plenty of juicy stories to come in the second season, which picks up a few weeks after the bloody beatdown that lands Piper (Taylor Schilling) in solitary. “We had a theme for season 2. A little darker, a little more fractured. We wanted to explore the groups one at a time,” says Kohan. “It was getting a little summer-campy, and we wanted to address the realities that this is prison.” READ FULL STORY

This Week's Cover: Inside this summer's superhero epic 'X-Men: Days of Future Past'

Two time periods. Six countries. More than a dozen stars. Hundreds of killer robots. It’s not hard to see why 20th Century Fox’s $200 million-plus X-Men: Days of Future Past is the priciest and most complicated X-Men film to date. “I think this is the biggest movie Fox has made that James Cameron didn’t direct,” says producer-writer Simon Kinberg (X-Men: First Class). Adds producer Lauren Schuler Donner, who’s worked on every X-Men film, “We have to deliver, and that’s really hard. Plus, we don’t use guns, we use powers. The power is a visual effect. So by its very nature, it’s going to be pricey.” READ FULL STORY

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