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Tag: The Tonight Show (21-30 of 76)

'Harry Styles' -- a.k.a. Kristen Wiig -- stops by 'The Tonight Show': VIDEO

This must be why they call her Kristen Wiig.

On Tuesday, the Bridesmaids star strapped on some truly gravity-defying hair for her first appearance on Jimmy Fallon’s second Tonight Show. But Wiig wasn’t there to plug a new project (though her mock-miniseries The Spoils of Babylon recently wrapped up on IFC, and she’s got several movies in the works) — she was there to impersonate 20-year-old One Direction heartthrob and possible Kardashian family accessory Harry Styles.

Well, maybe “impersonate” isn’t exactly the right word. Wiig is a talented mimic — but she didn’t bother trying to ape Harry’s voice or mannerisms on Tonight. Instead, the whole joke of the segment was that Wiig doesn’t know the most basic things about  Styles, from how his boy band formed to the simple fact that he’s, uh, from England. It’s a fun, loose bit that inevitably leads to both Wiig and Fallon cracking up like they’ve forgotten they’re on television — but if you’re already a fan of either, you’ll probably cracking along with them. Especially when Wiig takes a stab at naming Harry’s favorite food.

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'The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon' premiere review: No one is more excited than Jimmy

Everything had to go wrong for Jimmy Fallon to get The Tonight Show. NBC had to choose Leno over Letterman, and then choose Leno again over O’Brien: A pair of historic injustices, if you’re the kind of person who treats millionaire-white-dude desk-swapping like generation-defining culture-quakes. There’s a school of thinking that Letterman and O’Brien “deserved” The Tonight Show — not to mention two decades of jokes about how Leno didn’t deserve it. But deserve’s got nothing to do with it. The Tonight Show is a powerful concept — a way to talk about Hollywood or America or Comedy or Whatever Matters Now — but it’s also a straightforward piece of old-fashioned showbiz, a variety show airing five times a week on a network that needs to make money.

Letterman and O’Brien always had a perspective on the late-night franchise that was simultaneously admirable and totally weird: They seemed to buy in completely to the grand idea of The Tonight Show, but also want more than anything to stamp themselves completely onto that grand idea. As related in Bill Carter’s The War for Late Night, O’Brien could have actually kept The Tonight Show but refused to move it back to midnight. Four years later, it’s hard to tell whether that exit was a brave blow struck in the eternal battle of Individual against Machine, or a defining moment in the history of Taking Things Too Seriously. READ FULL STORY

With 'The Tonight Show' looming, one last look at Jimmy Fallon's best 'Late Night' music bits

Tonight, Jimmy Fallon officially launches the next wave for The Tonight Show when he kicks off his reign as host. (Fallon shared his own excitement about taking over the late night institution with fans on Instagram.) Though he has been saying for months that his version of The Tonight Show won’t waver very much from the format established by Late Night With Jimmy Fallon, we won’t know whether or not that is true until after the credits roll on this evening’s premiere (and really, we won’t truly know until Fallon settles into a groove a few months from now).

His first week is packed with huge stars. Will Smith and U2 appear on tonight’s show, with Jerry Seinfeld, Kristen Wiig, and Lady Gaga handling guest duties on Tuesday. Wednesday includes Bradley Cooper and Tim McGraw, while Thursday’s show welcomes Michelle Obama, Will Ferrell, and Arcade Fire. Longtime Fallon friend and collaborator Justin Timberlake will be the sole visitor on Friday.

But there’s at least one thing we can take for granted going into tonight’s kick off, which airs at midnight to accomodate NBC’s ongoing coverage of the Olympics. No matter what bits, characters, and themes make the shift from Late Night to Tonight, the Roots will continue to serve as Fallon’s musical accompaniment and secret weapon. When the hip-hop collective took the job back in 2008, it seemed like a step down for a group who had already won a Grammy and scored a couple of gold records along the way. But now, they’re as big a cultural institution as they’ve ever been, and much of Fallon’s success has been fueled by The Roots’ ability to act as a savvy improv troupe and roll with the host’s musical whims.

In fact, most every one of the best moments from Late Night With Jimmy Fallon are music-related. In honor of the five years Fallon ruled the after-hours slot, here are five highlights of his run.  READ FULL STORY

Jimmy Fallon: More than Jay or Dave, he could be a new Johnny Carson

Tonight, when Jimmy Fallon takes over The Tonight Show, it may sound woefully out-of-date to suggest that he in any way wants to be, or should be, or is going to be “the new Johnny Carson.” The very phrase reeks of Vegas mothballs. Over the last two decades, starting with the moment when Jay Leno launched his Attack Of The Nice Guy blandified makeover, The Tonight Show has effectively been de-Johnny-fied, and Fallon, who is 24 years younger than Leno (and would be 49 years younger than Carson if Carson were still alive), represents a brand new generation — or maybe I should say a new-brand generation — in the dominance of late night. The amazing freshness of Fallon’s appeal is that he’s looking forward, not back. READ FULL STORY

'The Tonight Show' without Jay Leno: Like the man said, it's time to go

Jay Leno said goodbye to The Tonight Show for the second time in his career on Thursday. Gone for good? So he joked. “I don’t need to be fired three times! I get the hint!” And so he wept, during his most personal — and arguably best — moment of his 22-year run as the custodian of the hallowed late night institution. “It really is time for me to go and hand it off to the next guy.” His last hour was a pretty good one, highlighted by the pure-pop moment of Billy Crystal bringing out a bunch of stars — Jack Black, Jim Parsons, Carol Burnett, Oprah Winfrey — for a snarky-funny ribbing of NBC for wanting Leno gone, or as the comedian put it earlier this week, in his sarcastic, self-serving way, “dead.” But those minutes, with Leno breaking down at his desk, were undeniably powerful. “This is tricky,” he said as he recalled how he lost his mother, father, and brother during the first three years of hosting The Tonight Show, and how the show and his work filled the void of a man suddenly without family, save for his wife of 34 years, Mavis. “This has been the greatest 22 years of life.”

It was a powerful exit for a man who loved his job and loves to work, perhaps too much, and who served his network faithfully if not always well, and vice versa. As affecting as Leno’s last bow might have been, the episodes that preceded the finale this past week represented a convincing argument that NBC needs a new suit sitting behind the desk, and a whole new creative sensibility in general.
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What should Jay Leno do next? -- VOTE

Jay Leno has left The Tonight Show, but Jay Leno is not finished being Jay Leno. The host may have waved his second final goodbye to the NBC late-night institution this week. But we all know he’s not finished. When Johnny Carson left The Tonight Show, he effectively left pop culture. It’s impossible to imagine an inveterate workaholic like Leno hasn’t already considered several post-Tonight options. But what’s his best bet? Let’s run down the most likely and most awesome possibilities — and then take a vote, because this is America.

Go to CNN. The most popular theory holds that Leno will join his former NBC boss Jeff Zucker at the ratings-challenged news network, hosting some kind of show in primetime or late-night. Given that CNN is still nominally a serious-news network, such a move would probably reboot Leno less as a comedian and more as a Larry King-esque interviewer. A possible happy side effect of the CNN option: Leno could take over Piers Morgan’s 9 p.m. slot. Because whatever you think about Leno, we can all agree that he’s more likable than Piers Morgan. (Which, admittedly, could be said about everyone.) READ FULL STORY

Late night hosts say goodbye to Jay Leno -- VIDEO

Thursday night, the late night world said goodbye to Jay Leno as his final episode as host of the Tonight Show aired. Some took the opportunity to get one final Leno joke off their chest (guess who that was?), while others pushed their past issues with Leno aside and offered their congratulations. See what Leno’s peers had to say: READ FULL STORY

Jay Leno says tearful goodbye to 'Tonight': 'It really is time to go'

Jay Leno fought back tears as he said goodbye to the Tonight Show 22 years after taking over the show from Johnny Carson. “It really is time to go and hand it off to the next guy,” he said, before evoking the farewell words of his predecessor. “I bid you all a heartfelt goodbye.”

Leno expressed his appreciation for his loyal audience and the crew he worked with for more than two decades. “The first year of the show, I lost my mom. The second year, I lost my dad,” he said. “Then my brother died and after that I was pretty much out of family… and the folks here became my family.”

Watch EW’s coverage below: READ FULL STORY

Late night highlight: Sandra Bullock's teary Leno goodbye

Over the years, a lot (a lot) of famous people have hated on Jay Leno. Sandra Bullock, however, has always been a fan — and she told the Tonight Show staple as much Wednesday, during Leno’s penultimate episode as host.

“You’ve always been so kind,” the Oscar winner told the comedian as tears began to well up. “You were always so welcoming and every single person on your crew was that way consistently, and I just felt special even when I felt very insecure. And everyone, I think, in this room and in this country, has felt that every day that you’ve been in their homes. I’m so grateful that I got to be a part of this.”

Watch the moment in our highlight video below — and keep a box of tissues handy, just in case.

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'Big Jaw' vs. the World: A history of Jay Leno hate

Fact #1: Jay Leno has been the most popular late night host in America for the majority of the past 19 years.

Fact #2: Comedians, Hollywood insiders, and laypeople alike just love hating on Leno, and have been doing so consistently for over 20 years.

Why? In their minds, the reasons are legion: Because he stole The Tonight Show from Johnny Carson’s rightful heir, David Letterman, way back in the early ’90s. Because he refused to simply retire when NBC tried to replace him with Conan O’Brien in 2009. Because his primetime Jay Leno Show tanked, sinking Conan’s Tonight Show before it had even really begun — and eventually forcing Conan to leave NBC for good. And most of all, because they say his jokes are broad, pandering, and eminently unfunny — which is a shame particularly because once upon a time, Leno had a reputation for being one of standup’s sharpest and edgiest comedians.

So as Leno prepares for his final few Tonight Shows, he finds himself in a unique position: More widely watched than any of his competitors, yet widely reviled by the majority of his peers. How widely, you ask? Let’s take a look back at the most notable jabs, slights, and straight-up insults famous people have aimed at Leno over the years — starting shortly after NBC revealed that he, rather than Letterman, would become Tonight‘s next host. (Insert “Jay takes it on the chin” joke here.)

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