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Tag: The More You Know (1-10 of 18)

Dirty 'SNL' tune makes good, a historic 'Simpsons' snub, and more 2014 Emmys talking points

There’ll be plenty of time to celebrate what the Emmys got right (see the full list of nominees here) and to argue about what they got wrong—but this is not the place for that. Instead, we’re taking a step back to discuss weird bits of trivia about the award show’s less starry categories. You know, the stuff that’s really important. Such as:

“Twin Bed” got an Emmy nomination: Yes, the SNL tune officially known as “Home for the Holidays (Twin Bed)” is competing against Key & Peele‘s take on Les Mis, “Merroway Cove” from Disney Channel’s animated Sofia The First, “Bigger!” from the Tony Awards, “No Trouble” from PBS’s A Christmas Carol — The Concert, and one more…

– Sons of Anarchy‘s lone nomination is in original music and lyrics: You wouldn’t expect a show about biker gangs to be recognized for its music, but “Day Is Gone,” written in part by creator Kurt Sutter and played over the sixth season finale, marks Sons of Anarchy‘s only Emmy nod.

– This is the first year The Simpsons has been denied a nomination for Outstanding Animated Program: The long-running sitcom snagged Animated Program nominations from 1990-1992, then spent two years submitting itself for Outstanding Comedy Series instead. (The ploy didn’t work, even though The Simpsons was in its prime in 1993 and 1994.) It returned to the Animated Program category in 1995 and has been nominated there every year since… until now. READ FULL STORY

Ask Dalton: How to stop watching 'Big Brother' (you can't), and other queries

Are DVR battles hurting your marriage? What are the ethics of sneaking food into theaters—or watching lowbrow reality TV? Our resident pop culture omnivore Dalton Ross offers his sage advice.

Should I feel bad about smuggling soda and snacks into the movie theater? —LUCAS
Ask yourself this question, Lucas: Do movie theaters feel bad about charging you $12.75 for cold popcorn and a Fanta filled with 63 percent ice? Not only should you not feel bad, you should revel in your culinary craftiness. I encourage your anarchic cheapskate ways, but with a few simple caveats. Don’t be that dude cracking open cans and rummaging through loud plastic bags during the film. Pop the top during one of the approximately 11,274 previews before the movie (during an explosion, if at all possible), and house all prearranged snacks in whisper-quiet packaging. Stealth mode is a must when acting as the world’s foremost concession-stand ninja. (Also, nothing too pungent, please. That’s just common courtesy.) READ FULL STORY

Michael Che: 5 things to know

Note: NBC revealed on Sept. 11 that Michael Che is headed to Saturday Night Live‘s Weekend Update desk when the series’ 40th season premieres on Sept. 27. Learn more about Che’s background in the post below, originally published April 28.

Who is Michael Che, The Daily Show‘s latest recruit? First and foremost, he’s a prolific workhorse of a standup known for performing in New York City comedy clubs seven nights a week, often in multiple venues each night. Secondly, he’s a writer for SNL whose work includes “12 Days Not a Slave” and that weird sketch where Zach Galifianakis plays a racist M&M. Thirdly, he’s a rising star who recently snagged a role in Chris Rock’s upcoming film Finally Famous, which sort of sounds like Rock’s take on Funny People. (Update: The movie is now called Top Five; it sparked a bidding war at the Toronto International Film Festival, eventually getting acquired by Paramount.)

But important as these tidbits may be, they’re also just lines on Che’s resume — and they don’t say much about what we might expect from him once he makes the leap from NBC to Comedy Central. Maybe these fun facts will be a little more revealing:

READ FULL STORY

Google honors Dorothy Irene Height

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Today’s simple, striking Google homepage Doodle honors what would have been the 102nd birthday of Dorothy Irene Height.

Height was a civil and women’s rights activist who’s credited with bridging the gap between the Civil Rights and Feminist movements. She was awarded both the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1994 and the Congressional Gold Medal in 2004.

Height sat on the stage behind Martin Luther King Jr. as he gave his famous “I Have a Dream” speech, according to Time. She also co-founded the National Women’s Political Caucus with Gloria Steinem and Betty Friedan. After her death in 2010, President Obama called her the “godmother of the civil rights movement.”

You can watch President Obama’s eulogy of Height below: READ FULL STORY

Kate Winslet explains why she named her son Bear Blaze -- VIDEO

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This past December, Kate Winslet and husband Ned Rocknroll (more on that name later) welcomed a new baby boy into the world: Bear Blaze Winslet. So when the actress went on Ellen yesterday — for an interview that will air today — Ellen DeGeneres naturally asked how Winslet came up with that amazing name.

“A friend of mine when I was younger was nicknamed Bear, and I had just always really loved it,” Winslet explained. “He was everyone’s shoulder to cry on, he was a big bear hug, he was just this great figure in my life. And I had just always remembered it.”

READ FULL STORY

Hey, remember that time a 'True Detective' villain slept with Charlotte on 'Sex and the City'?

[Semi-spoilers if you haven’t seen the True Detective finale. *shakes fist at HBO Go*]

Did Errol Childress — the sister-groping serial murderer whose reign of terror was finally foiled on Sunday night’s True Detective — look weirdly familiar to you? If so, you probably recognized actor Glenn Fleshler from Boardwalk Empire (he played bootlegger George Remus) or Damages (as Detective Milton Trammell).

What you may not realize, however, is that those two shows were hardly Fleshler’s first brush with prestige cable TV. Check out the bottom of his IMDB profile, and you’ll find that way back in 1998, he made one of his very first onscreen appearances in the very first season of Sex and the City — as Shmuel, a smoldering Hasidic artist who briefly tangles with Charlotte (Kristin Davis).

READ FULL STORY

'True Detective' creator had 'no idea' about Matthew McConaughey's eerie 'Unsolved Mysteries' gig -- VIDEO

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A long, long time ago, when the star of Dallas Buyers Club was just a slip of a McConaughey, he made his onscreen debut in an episode of Unsolved Mysteries.

McConaughey played Larry Dickens, a heroic young man who confronts a pedophile and ends up being shot 14 times for his trouble. Also, his character’s mother is called Dorothy Lang. Hmm — McConaughey going up against a sex offender, a name that’s thisclose to Dora Lange… sounds a lot like HBO’s True Detective, doesn’t it? There’s even a red pickup truck! (And, yes, strategic shirtlessness; once a McConaughey, always a McConaughey.) READ FULL STORY

Want to know all the stuff 'The Lego Movie' is riffing on? Here's a reference guide

Before The Lego Movie could hit theaters last Friday, some assembly was required.

Correction: A lot of assembly.

Phil Lord and Chris Miller’s incredibly entertaining “block”buster is a hyperkinetic Frankenfilm, cobbled together from a variety of sources both huge (the classic “hero’s journey” monomyth) and teeny (does a certain dolphin noise sound familiar?). The movie is also filled with casting in-jokes, snippets of dialogue borrowed from other movies, and callbacks to the directors’ past work. All in all, it’s enough to make your head spin, Lego minifigure-style — there’s no way for one person to catch all these references in a single viewing.

That, happily, is where we come in. Check below for a guide to some of the film’s most notable references, compiled both from the movie itself and a close reading of its actual script. And since the film’s jam-packed enough that there’s no way to note everything Lord and Miller are riffing on, feel free to add missing pieces in the comments. Caution: It’s spoiler city down there. READ FULL STORY

Fred Armisen's music career: A pre-'Late Night' primer -- VIDEO

It’s no joke: Comedian Fred Armisen really has joined Seth Meyers’ Late Night as bandleader-slash-music-”curator.” He’ll be helming the talk show’s house band — a talented group that also includes guitarist Seth Jabour of Les Savy Fav, bassist Syd Butler of Les Savy Fav, keyboardist Eli Janney of Girls Against Boys, and drummer Kim Thompson of Beyoncé’s touring band — even when he’s busy with other projects, like IFC’s Portlandia.

For those who know Armisen only as “that weird guy from SNL,” this news may seem more than a little random. But Armisen’s actually got plenty of music industry bona fides — his showbiz career began with a gig as a punk rock drummer, he made his first steady paycheck as a drummer for the Blue Man Group in Chicago, and he’s frequently showed off his multi-instrumental skills on both SNL and Portlandia. So before Armisen picks up his Late Show guitar — he’ll be both strumming and singing for Meyers’ 8G Band — let’s take a look back at his second, slightly more obscure career… which frequently bleeds over into his comedy.

READ FULL STORY

The sweariest movie in Academy history, who's up for an EGOT, and more 2014 Oscars talking points

Want to win friends and influence people using your intimate knowledge of this year’s Oscar nominees — and how they stack up against Academy history? Never fear: EW’s got you covered. (Caution: Nerd alert!)

- It’s unclear how many times the F-word is used in The Wolf of Wall Street. Vulture says it’s 569; Slate says it’s 544; some guy at some blog says it’s 506. In any case, it’s one of the most profanity-laced films in history and certainly the swearingest movie ever to be nominated for Best Picture. Wolf director Martin Scorsese’s own Goodfellas, with a mere 300 documented “f—”s, is the previous record holder.

- American Hustle is the 15th film to receive nods in every acting category. David O. Russell is the first director to helm two movies (back to back, no less) that have both achieved this feat. No movie has ever won all four acting awards, though A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) and Network (1976) got three wins apiece. Also worth noting: While quadfectas generally snag at least one acting award, only two (1942′s Mrs. Miniver and 1953′s From Here to Eternity) have ever managed a Best Picture win.
READ FULL STORY

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