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Tag: The Hobbit (31-40 of 56)

From covering Lady Gaga to pimping out dormice: Everything you need to know about on tour British comic Bill Bailey

Bill-Bailey

Bill Bailey is one of the most popular comedians in the U.K. thanks to his appearances on shows such as Black Books, Spaced, and Never Mind the Buzzcocks and his surreal, hilarious, stand-up routines. This month, Bailey is visiting these shores with dates in New York, Chicago and Boston. “There’s something for all tastes,” he says of his current show, Dandelion Mind. “There’s intellectual comedy. There’s observational stuff. Music. Lots of visuals. It’s a multi-media romp!” The tour will also be opportunity for audience members to see why Bailey is routinely mistaken for Metallica drummer Lars Ulrich. “Oh yeah, that’s happened many times,” he admits with a chuckle. “You’re Lars!’ ‘No, I’m not.’ ‘Yes, you are!’ ‘No, I’m not.’ And then eventually you go, ‘Yeah, alright, f— it, I am. I’m Lars!’”

Here are five more things you need to know about Mr Bailey: READ FULL STORY

'Hobbit' titles: Tolkien touch or Lifetime drama?

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On the same weekend that the blandly labeled The Hangover Part II was cleaning up at the box office, Peter Jackson revealed the titles for his two Hobbit films: An Unexpected Journey and There and Back Again. Many Tolkien fans rejoiced, as There and Back Again was the subtitle for the original 1937 novel, and An Unexpected Journey echoes the title of the book’s chapter, “An Unexpected Party.”

But are these epic movie titles, on par with The Fellowship of the Ring, and The Return of the King? Because An Unexpected Journey and There and Back Again could also pass as Lifetime movies starring Meredith Baxter.

Did Jackson nail it, or are you crinkling your nose at these titles? Vote below. READ FULL STORY

Lee Pace cast in 'The Hobbit.' Our hopes for his comeback grow

It looks like the part of me that’s been hoping to see Lee Pace back on TV soon might be waiting quite a while. This weekend, Peter Jackson announced via Facebook that the Pushing Daisies alum had been cast as Elven King Thranduil in The Hobbit. “Casting these Tolkien stories is very difficult, especially the Elven characters, and Lee has always been our first choice for Thranduil,” Jackson wrote. “We loved his performance in a movie called The Fall a few years ago, and have been hoping to work with him since.” READ FULL STORY

'Hobbit' poll: Is there still some elf left in Bret McKenzie?

When Bret McKenzie of the Flight of the Conchords comedy duo was reported to be a castmember in Peter Jackson’s The Hobbit, there were at least two different but equally enthusiastic reactions. The non-obsessive casual Lord of the Rings fan response may have been, “Wow, he’s got the perfect look for a hobbit. With that bushy hair, he practically looks bred in the Shire.” Diehard Middle-earthlings, on the other hand, knew better and may have greeted the news with a triumphant shout-out: “Figwit!” For though you can hardly recognize him, McKenzie previously appeared in two of the LOTR films, playing an unnamed elf that fans adopted and christened, Figwit. READ FULL STORY

EXCLUSIVE: Aidan Turner on prepping for 'The Hobbit' and possibly leaving 'Being Human'

A-Turner-320.jpgImage Credit: Touchpaper Television and BBC AmericaThe U.K. version of Being Human returned last night with a big shocker: While saving Annie (Lenora Crichlow) from Purgatory (where she’s been stuck since last season’s finale), Aidan Turner’s Mitchell discovered that, unlike most vampires, he’s going to die. And a werewolf is going to kill him—which is pretty problematic because he lives with two. So does this mean that Turner, who recently landed the major role of dwarf Kili in Peter Jackson’s The Hobbit could be leaving the cult hit? The actor chatted with EW from the movie’s New Zealand set to straighten things out, talk a bit about The Hobbit and spill some more details about Mitchell’s new storyline, the much-hyped return of his bloodsucking season 1 foe Herrick (Jason Watkins), his blossoming relationship with ghost Annie, and more (SPOILER-phobes beware).

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: You were sporting a pretty impressive beard at the Hobbit press conference. Is that for Kili?
AIDAN TURNER: Yeah, it is. I’m growing out the beard. We’re giving it a chance, seeing what it looks like. READ FULL STORY

The 'the' is THE best thing to happen to the titles of the movies in the theaters.

THE-dark-knightImage Credit: Stephen VaughanTwo new films are opening wide this weekend: The Mechanic and The Rite. They’ll compete against recent releases like The Green Hornet and The Dilemma, not to mention newly-minted Best Picture nominees The King’s Speech and The Fighter. (Meanwhile, fellow nominees The Social Network and The Kids Are All Right have just hit DVD stores.) Coming soon to theaters: The Roommate and The Eagle. What do all these movies have in common? It’s the The — the definite article, language’s precision instrument, “T-H-E,” a word that seemed bit old-fashioned and archaic just a few years ago, at least in movie titles.

Not anymore. Now, “The” is everywhere. READ FULL STORY

Thank you, Sir Ian McKellen, for saying 'Yes' to 'The Hobbit.' Thank you even more for telling us why.

Gandalf-the-GrayImage Credit: Pierre VinetWould I have been crestfallen if Ian McKellen had passed on playing Gandalf in the upcoming Hobbit films? Well, yes, actually. Certainly because his performance, especially in The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, was my favorite part of the entire trilogy, but also because his absence might have made his reflective and forthright blog posts about the subject unnecessary. Beginning his latest entry with “All I had to decide was what to do with the time that is given me,” he has the gift of writing in his own singular voice, as I can’t read his thoughts without hearing Sir Ian whispering them. READ FULL STORY

Elijah Wood in 'The Hobbit': How would that work?

Elijah-Wood-King-bookIt’s official: EW has confirmed that Elijah Wood will reprise his role as Frodo Baggins in the upcoming bigscreen version of The Hobbit. If you’re a J.R.R. Tolkien fan, the initial response is probably: “How?” For one thing, Frodo doesn’t appear in The Hobbit novel, for a very good reason: It takes place sixty years before the events in Lord of the Rings, before Frodo was even born. Well, official Rings and Hobbit fansite TheOneRing.net has an answer (SPOILER ALERT): READ FULL STORY

'Hobbit' director Peter Jackson talks about casting a 'heartthrob' dwarf (Exclusive)

Richard-ArmitageImage Credit: Mike Marsland/WireImage.comIt’s been a long time coming, but there was finally cause for rejoicing in Middle-earth last week when director Peter Jackson announced he’d cast several key roles in his adaptation of J.R.R. Tolkien’s classic fantasy novel, The Hobbit. The casting of Martin Freeman of the UK Office fame as Bilbo Baggins was widely expected, but some Tolkien fans were surprised and slightly befuddled to see English actor Richard Armitage, best known for the BBC series MI-5, cast as Thorin Oakenshield, the gruff leader of a company of dwarves. What was Jackson doing hiring a hunky actor to play a character most often depicted in illustrations — and in the 1977 animated Hobbit movie — as a squat, crabby, Wilford Brimley-ish old dwarf with a long white beard? In an interview (after the jump), Jackson tells EW the choice is actually right in line with the casting of Viggo Mortensen as Aragorn and Orlando Bloom as Legolas in the Lord of the Rings trilogy. READ FULL STORY

Peter Jackson vents his frustration over the bitter 'Hobbit' labor dispute: 'I'm out of my depth.'

Peter Jackson has staged some epic, humdinger battles on-screen, but the battle royale taking place off-screen over The Hobbit — with actors’ unions feuding with the production and Warner Bros. threatening to relocate filming out of New Zealand — clearly has left him deeply exasperated. In an interview with a New Zealand television reporter (see part of the interview embedded below), the director vents his frustration at the ongoing labor dispute, which is just the latest in a series of difficult hurdles he has had to overcome to bring The Hobbit to the screen.

Appearing with co-writer Philippa Boyens on a soundstage built for The Hobbit, he frets that the unions’ boycott — which he says had “no validity” — has done great harm to the reputation of the New Zealand film industry, so much so that he doesn’t know how he can persuade Warner Bros. that it should spend hundreds of millions of dollars to make the two Hobbit films there. “I don’t know what to say,” he says. “This is where I’m out of my depth … I can talk my way around the movie. But to tell the studio why investing $500 million in our country is a good idea when they’ve just seen the disgusting, frivolous action that’s happened … I literally don’t know what to say to them.” Taking aim at Helen Kelly, the president of the New Zealand Council of Trade Unions, who has been critical of his handling of the dispute, Jackson’s anger boils over: “How dare you. You are choosing an Australian union over the workers of our country. Stuff her. I don’t care what the hell she says.”

READ FULL STORY

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