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Tag: TCA (1-3 of 3)

Let's all just stop talking about the nudity on 'Girls'

We are not capable of talking about nudity in pop culture. We’re terrible at it. Look at this Girls thing. A journalist asked a poorly-phrased question, which the Girls producers interpreted in the least accurate manner possible. Everybody was their worst self. Then the journalist tried to clarify his question in a post on TheWrap. It’s a well-written post in which everyone comes off terribly: The journalist, the producers, men, women. READ FULL STORY

Maggie Smith's famous son won't watch 'Downton Abbey'

Maggie-Smith-Downton-Abbey.jpg

Who doesn’t love to watch Dame Maggie Smith’s Emmy-winning Dowager Countess and her cunning bons mots?

Her own son! Actor Toby Stephens told reporters at the Television Critics Association press tour on Friday that he doesn’t enjoy watching Downton Abbey.

The former Bond villain and lead in Starz’s upcoming pirate drama Black Sails was asked whether he’d prefer to be on a sleepy drama like the ITV/PBS hit rather than his action-heavy new show.

“Any day of the week, I’d prefer to be on the show I am now,” Stephens said. “I appreciate Downton Abbey for what it is. I don’t regularly tune in. It’s not really a show I enjoy — It’s just not really what I enjoy watching. Playing this kind of thing for me is like going on an exotic vacation because we don’t do this kind of stuff in the UK. … I’ve seen [UK shows], I’ve done it, I don’t want to do it for the rest of my life. This is fantastic story and production values, that’s what I want to be involved in.”

In other words: Forget that low-budget British-y stuff, bring on more Michael Bay!

NBC exec says there's no time to nurture TV shows anymore. Is she right?

Back in 1991, 9.7 percent of television households watched George Costanza embarrass himself via answering machine on Feb. 13, when the fourth episode of Seinfeld’s second season aired. By today’s standards, that number — and the 13 million viewers that came with it — would make Seinfeld the most-watched show on TV. Even Sunday Night Football, last season’s biggest eyeball-grabber, earned a rating of just 8.2 — two full points above the season’s second place show, CBS’s The Big Bang Theory.

But before the days of DVRs, increased cable competition, and the vast wilds of the Internet, a 9.7 rating wasn’t so impressive — especially coming after weeks of dwindling viewership. NBC would have been within its rights to can the show then and there. Instead, the network chose to hold onto Seinfeld — after putting it on a two-month hiatus.

The rest, of course, is history. Barring a few dips here and there, Seinfeld returned stronger than ever, racking up ratings as well as Emmy nominations. By season 5, it was the third-most watched show on television; by season 6 it was number one.

The Seinfeld story should be a comfort to any showrunner with a beloved but under-watched program. Unfortunately, according to NBC Entertainment president Jennifer Salke, it’s a trajectory that’s just not possible anymore. “With deteriorating ratings the tolerance for a show that’s struggling is just shorter than it’s ever been,” she told TV critics at TCA over the weekend. “So it’s frustrating for all of us that you can’t take the time to nurture a show and grow the audience as much as you might want to.”
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