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Tag: superheroes (1-5 of 5)

Catch up on 56 years of X-Men history in 25 moments

Fifty-six years is a pretty big chunk of time — especially when we’re talking about the mythology-heavy X-Men universe.

In an effort to bridge the gap between 1962 — the time when X-Men First Class took place — and the upcoming X-Men: Days of Future Past, set in 2018, Fox has unveiled an interactive history lesson in the form of a website titled 25 Moments.













The site sets up the Days of Future Past backstory by explaining 25 key events that have led to the dystopian world of 2018. Significant milestones and conflicts in human-mutant relations are highlighted, from President Nixon’s deals with the anti-mutant Trask Industries to the building of a massive “Mutant Wall” between the U.S. and Mexico for “security” purposes (Captain America: The Winter Soldier apparently has nothing on this film’s attempts at real-world allegory). READ FULL STORY

'Captain America: The Winter Soldier' is the most political (and subversive) superhero movie ever made

We spend a lot of time here on the internet talking about the Meaning of blockbuster movies, attempting to analyze what some new mega-successful PG-13 rated corporate-branded movie says about our culture or the age we live in. We do this maybe because blockbuster movies have become more interested in tackling weighty themes. (9/11 is all over the Christopher Nolan Batman movies and the J.J. Abrams Star Trek movies; conversely, it’s difficult to graft some larger mid-’90s topical narrative onto Star Trek: First Contact or Batman Forever.) But we also do this because blockbuster movies are popular, and it’s fun to use popular things as a prism for understanding the issues of our day. It’s rare for a blockbuster movie to come right out and announce its intentions.

And so I was legitimately shocked and impressed and fascinated when I reached the middle of Captain America: The Winter SoldierSPOILERS FROM HERE — and got to the scene where the movie clearly states that our modern intelligence apparatus and our whole system of national security was invented by some of the greatest villains of the 20th Century. And worse: Like the vampires of the pre-glitter period, HYDRA was welcomed in by their victims, freely and of their own will. In real-world terms, Winter Soldier basically says that the NSA was invented by Nazis…and that we let it happen, insisted even, giving up our freedom because we were too afraid to do anything else. EW critic Owen Gleiberman pointed out in his review that the villain in Winter Soldier is really the military-industrial complex. And that villain has accomplices, accessories, and henchmen who help the bad guys by doing nothing. To paraphrase Pogo: We have met the enemy, and they is us. READ FULL STORY

'Batman' TV prequel: What we can expect from 'Gotham'

Fox chose an auspicious moment to greenlight a Batman prequel show. The same day the network announced Gotham, eternal rival Marvel saw its multi-punctuated Avengers spin-off Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. deliver a dominant series-premiere ratings performance. S.H.I.E.L.D.‘s success is proof-of-concept for a new Superhero-Adjacent genre: A show set in a familiar super-universe that focuses on the less-super (and decidedly cheaper) heroes.

Gotham is superficially similar. Like S.H.I.E.L.D., it transforms a supporting character into the lead: The show will apparently constitute an origin story for Commissioner Gordon, the chief lawman and Friend-of-Batman played by Gary Oldman in the Dark Knight trilogy. But it also appears that Gotham will prominently feature other characters from the comic book mythos. Fox has indicated that iconic villains will also appear, in some kind of fetal prequel form. Expect to learn more about the show in tantalizing tidbits released in regularly Internet-imploding news releases over the next few months, but here are five talking points about Gotham:
READ FULL STORY

Zack Snyder looking for an older Batman? Josh Brolin, Joe Manganiello, and the latest rumors

Here is what we actually know about the sequel to Man of Steel: It’s coming out in 2015, and it will somehow feature Batman. Everything else at this point is conjecture or mysteriously-sourced gossip. Still, it’s worth paying extra attention to a casting report posted over the weekend by the Hollywood Reporter. The report features a list of names that run the gamut from obvious (wait, Hollywood wants to cast Ryan Gosling in a movie?) to intriguing (Richard Armitage, so good as the chief Dwarf in The Hobbit) to tantalizingly unlikely (listen, I love me some Max Martini — Herc Hansen 4 Life! — but the odds of him playing Batman are less likely than the odds of Benedict Cumberbatch playing a humpback whale in the next Star Trek movie.) But there’s a key revelation in the report: “According to numerous sources, this Wayne/Batman will be in the late 30s or around the 40 mark… established and rugged.” READ FULL STORY

'Harlem Shadow': Russell Simmons, Common team for Jazz Age animated hero series

Music and fashion mogul Russell Simmons says he has  October’s New York Comic-Con circled on his calendar for the first big reveal of The Harlem Shadow, a new animated online superhero series that will be set in the Jazz Age and features hip-hop star Common in the title voice role.

The series is an adaptation of the indie small-press series of the same name from RavenHammer Comics and the creative team of Brian Williams and Christian Colbert. (That version of the hero is shown in the poster image above.) After the Javitts Center debut, some early content will be online by year’s end at All Def Digital, the YouTube channel from Simmons and Brian Robbins of Awesomeness TV.
READ FULL STORY

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