PopWatch Entertainment Weekly's PopWatch Blog

Tag: Shia LaBeouf (1-10 of 28)

James Franco and other celebs who just can't stand criticism

James Franco does not take criticism of his work lightly. Currently starring in Of Mice and Men on Broadway, the actor was quite displeased with the review New York Times theater critic Ben Brantley gave the revival. Though Brantley’s assessment was not excessively negative — he even complimented Franco’s talent at one point — the actor posted an incensed response to the review on Instagram, calling the critic “a little bitch.” The post has since been deleted.

Brantley responded to the criticism much more diplomatically than Franco. “I like Franco’s work on film a lot, and he didn’t disgrace himself on stage,” the writer told the New York Observer. “I hope he returns to Broadway some day. And of course he’s entitled to say whatever he likes about me, as long as it’s not libelous, and somehow I don’t think ‘little bitch’ qualifies.”

Franco is hardly the first celebrity to lash out over hurt feelings and bad reviews. Last year, Brantley was the target of another famous actor appearing on Broadway, Alec Baldwin. The NYT critic panned his show, a revival of Orphans, and Baldwin shot back with a bitter essay on the state of modern theater on The Huffington Post. READ FULL STORY

Alec Baldwin vows to quit public life, adds Rachel Maddow to ever-growing enemies list

TMZ, the New York Post, and their ilk have had a lot of fun with Alec Baldwin over the years. A lot of fun. But the embattled former 30 Rock star has had enough, he says in a new New York Magazine cover story: he’s quitting public life. Just think how much the tabloids are going to be missing: They don’t have Alec Baldwin to kick around any more.

The last year has been rough on Baldwin professionally. Privately, it’s been a time of great joy, as he and his wife, Hilaria, welcomed a baby daughter. But even that blessing has been marred by several highly-publicized incidents with paparazzi whom Baldwin says have crossed the line and instigated confrontations. One of those confrontations resulted in accusations that Baldwin had uttered a gay pejorative, leading to his being branded a homophobe by several high-profile out media personalities. As a result, his newly-launched MSNBC talk show, in hindsight, was doomed to failure. Throw in his less momentous but even more fascinating Broadway pissing match with the formerly famous Shia LaBeouf, and Baldwin has had enough. In a 5,284-word confession that is half apology, half Nixonian diatribe, Baldwin settles old scores, makes new enemies, and announces that he’s probably done with New York. “There’s been a shift in my life,” he says. “And it’s caused me to step back and say, This is happening for a reason.”

On the way out the door, he slams a multitude of famous people for incompetence, phoniness, or outright stupidity. If Baldwin is sincere in his intention to retire from the spotlight — at least in the sense of participating in public discourse, both important and frivolous — his final blast was a corker. But I suspect his growing list of enemies will respond, denying him the final word.

1. Rachel Maddow
What Baldwin said: “Another [MSNBC employee] told me, regarding the ‘toxic little queen’ comment, that Rachel Maddow was the prime mover in my firing, as she was aghast that I had been hired and viewed me as equivalent to Mel Gibson. Another source told me, ‘You know who’s going to get you fired, don’t you? Rachel. Phil will do whatever Rachel tells him to do.’ I think Rachel Maddow is quite good at what she does. I also think she’s a phony who doesn’t have the same passion for the truth off-camera that she seems to have on the air.” READ FULL STORY

James Franco explains 'why actors act out' in 'New York Times' essay about Shia LaBeouf

James Franco has been known to make some dubious professional choices, from acting on General Hospital at the height of his career to his ill-received gig co-hosting the Oscars alongside Anne Hathaway. So it’s no surprise that he can relate to Shia LaBeouf’s recent string of bizarre behavior — ever since the Transformers star was accused of plagiarizing his short film HowardCantour.com back in December — and Franco put that empathy into a New York Times essay that went online Wednesday night.

“This behavior could be a sign of many things, from a nervous breakdown to mere youthful recklessness,” Franco writes. “For Mr. LaBeouf’s sake I hope it is nothing serious. Indeed I hope — and, yes, I know that this idea has pretentious or just plain ridiculous overtones — that his actions are intended as a piece of performance art, one in which a young man in a very public profession tries to reclaim his public persona.” READ FULL STORY

On the Scene: Shia LaBeouf's #IAMSORRY art exhibit in Los Angeles

The internet was abuzz when word got out Tuesday that Shia LaBeouf, the actor-turned-plagiarist-turned-“artist,” was opening up his own exhibit in Los Angeles to apologize for his recent string of bizarre behavior. People flocked to the small storefront art gallery to see if the Transformers star actually transformed at all, but who are these people willing to wait hours for some silent eye contact with a brown paper bag? EW went on the scene to see why people were showing up and waiting for hours, some even days.

The #IAMSORRY installation officially runs 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. every day until Sunday. Well, at least that’s what the door says. However, when you arrive at the “performance” space, you are told that the duration of the day depends completely on the artist and his particular mood and feeling that day — meaning LaBeouf could stop seeing anyone at any point of the day, whether it’s 2 p.m. or 2 a.m. However, there is no indication whatsoever as to how long you will be waiting or if you will ever even get to go inside and actually participate. Still knowing this, some people started waiting in line at 8 a.m. By 3 p.m., they were still waiting. There was even another journalist on site who apparently had waited six hours the day before only to be promised by a security guard that he would let him in the next day. Unfortunately, that security guard didn’t end up working the next day, and the journalist had to wait again all day and still wasn’t guaranteed to get in. READ FULL STORY

Shia LaBeouf and Jerry O'Connell are #SORRY, and we have thoughts

First Shia LaBeouf was accused of plagiarizing his short film HowardCantour.com. Then he was accused of plagiarizing his apologies. Then he relentlessly tweeted the phrase “I AM NOT FAMOUS ANYMORE,” before showing up to the Nymphomaniac premiere wearing a tux and a paper bag on his head that included that same phrase. THEN he wore that same tux and paper bag for a recent art installation, where people waited in line to come face-to-face with the actor.

What more is there to say about LaBeouf’s bizarre 2014? A lot, actually. The latest twist in the LaBeouf saga is a possible Funny or Die response from Jerry O’Connell, and when news broke of the stunt, it set off a firestorm in the EW.com chat room. So get ready to be a fly on our Facebook Wall as we replay the conversation below: READ FULL STORY

Step aside, Shia LaBeouf: Jerry O'Connell is sorry too, and he's got an art exhibit right next to yours!

Important life update: Shia LaBeouf is not famous anymore, and he’s sorry about it. Fun new twist: Jerry O’Connell hasn’t really been famous in years, and he’s sorry too. Take that, Shia!

In what is believed to be a Funny or Die stunt — O’Connell has a channel on the site — O’Connell has set up his own, competing art exhibit next to Shia LaBeouf’s #IAMSORRY space in L.A. O’Connell’s is appropriately titled #IAMSORRYTOO.

Check out Funny or Die‘s tweet below: READ FULL STORY

Emile Hirsch chimes in on Shia LaBeouf's latest: 'I am beginning to feel slightly more famous'

So Shia LaBeouf is not famous anymore, right? Didn’t I hear that somewhere? Oh wait, now I’m being told that he’s sorry. (P.S. Seems Jerry O’Connell is too.) For what though? For wasting a perfectly good paper bag? For ruining Even Stevens for me? I don’t know about you all, but I miss LaBeouf’s glory days. You know, when he fake-punched robots during the day and real-punched everyday people at night? Back then, I thought about him half as often and yet knew exactly how I felt about him.

But rumor has it that I’m not alone in my confusion about all of this “I am not famous anymore” stuff. I’ve got Emile Hirsch on my side! (And really, what more do I need?)

Hirsch has taken to Twitter to seemingly mock LaBeouf’s latest shenanigans, tweeting about how he feels “slightly more famous” and apologizing for “accidentally” leaving the caps lock on.

Check out Hirsch’s take on things below:

READ FULL STORY

Shia LaBeouf is sorry, opens L.A. art installation to prove it

On Tuesday, Shia LaBeouf gave up on his daily “I AM NOT FAMOUS ANYMORE” postings on Twitter and replaced it with an “#IAMSORRY” tweet — accompanied by an art installation in Los Angeles.

The installation, also titled “#IAMSORRY,” is running from Tuesday through Sunday, and, in true Shia fashion, seems pretty weird. It involves picking out an object that has to do with his previous work and then going into a room where LaBeouf himself sits, silently, with a bag over his head. Can’t wait to read about this in future generations’ art history textbooks!

Given LaBeouf’s now plagiarism-filled history, it shouldn’t be a surprise that the exhibit is suspiciously similar to a 2010 Marina Abramović installation at the Museum of Modern Art, which included the performance artist sitting across from individuals and staring silently at them. Original or not, the project isn’t all Shia: He collaborated with artists Nastja Säde Rönkkö and Luke Turner on it, according to a press release sent out by Turner himself.

For those who aren’t lucky enough to stop by, we rounded up some reactions from people who’ve visited the exhibit so far: READ FULL STORY

Shia LaBeouf -- who is 'NOT FAMOUS ANYMORE' -- fires back at Jim Carrey, quickly recants

The tags on this post are not entirely accurate; Shia LaBeouf and Jim Carrey aren’t exactly in a celebrity feud. Why? Because in order to be in a celebrity feud, one must be a celebrity. And Shia wants you to know that he is no longer one of those:

Reeaally embracing that retirement “from all public life,” Shia.

Anyway, here’s the LaBeef: While presenting the award for Best Motion Picture — Comedy or Musical at the Golden Globes last night, Jim Carrey decided to have a little fun at the Transformers star’s expense. He began his patter by quoting an old chestnut that may have originated with actor Edmund Gwenn: “Dying is easy. Comedy is hard.” Then came the kicker: “I believe it was Shia LaBeouf who said that. So young, so wise.”

READ FULL STORY

Shia LaBeouf says he is 'retiring from all public life'

Sorry, bloggers. You don’t have Shia LaBeouf to kick around any more, because, ladies and gentlemen, he’s retiring.

In a message this morning, the 27-year-old Transformers star announced he was retiring. “In light of the recent attacks against my artistic integrity, I am retiring from all public life,” he wrote. “My love goes out to those who have supported me. #stopcreating.”

A lot of what exactly that means remains unclear: Will his Twitter account remain intact? Will he eschew public appearances for upcoming films? Will he regress to watching old Even Stevens reruns on Disney channel, wondering where he went wrong? Do we care?

In additional to career woes, his legal troubles for this plagiarism scandal “performance art” seem far from over. Yesterday, LaBeouf tweeted out a cease & desist letter from the legal team behind Daniel Clowes, the comic artist whose work LaBeouf plagiarized. Futher legal action is unclear.

Offscreen, do you think we have we seen the last of LaBeouf? READ FULL STORY

Latest Videos

Advertisement

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP