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Tag: Sci-Fi (11-20 of 630)

'Star Trek' retro posters draw up 'The Gamesters of Triskellion,' 'That Which Survives' -- EW EXCLUSIVE

Artist and enterprising super-geek Juan Ortiz demonstrates his stylistic range in this month’s set of prints inspired by episodes of the original Star Trek television series. You can practically smell the musty newsprint wafting off the Silver Age, Kirby-esque Marvel Comics cover treatment of “The Gamers of Triskellion” (season 2, episode 16), in which Kirk, Chekov, and Uhura are taken prisoner by slavers who toil for awful entities known as The Providers and are made to participate in gladiator games against other captives. This premise has spawned a great many comic book stories, too. Just ask The Grandmaster. Of course, we are also reminded of that one episode of Challenge of the Super-Friends called “The Final Challenge“… but we digress, as we often do.

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Image Credit: Juan Ortiz

Ortiz evokes Steranko in going Op-art mod for “That Which Survives” (season 3, episode 17), in which the Enterprise runs afoul with a computer-controlled femme fatale with a poisonous touch. (See below.) You can purchase prints of the posters at Quantum Mechanix. T-shirts inspired by the prints? They would be at WeLoveFine beginning Sept. 5.

Twitter: @EWDocJensen

The truth is out there in Google's new Roswell-inspired Doodle

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The game hidden within today’s Google Doodle is out of this world. Users play as a cute, big-eyed alien who’s just crash-landed on a placid farm in the middle of the night. The goal is to collect a series of items that will get the extraterrestrial back to his flying saucer so he can return home — which, in practice, pretty much means wildly clicking on anything and everything onscreen just in case it turns out to be useful later. (Hint: It always will!) READ FULL STORY

Is a vast hoard of 'E.T.' videogames really buried at a landfill site in New Mexico?

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We may never find out if Big Foot exists, who Carly Simon wrote “You’re So Vain” about, or whether Leonardo DiCaprio is dreaming at the end of Inception. But there is one pop culture mystery which might be cleared up in the near future. For decades, it has been rumored that Atari buried millions of copies of its E.T. videogame at a landfill site in Alamogordo, New Mexico. Now, the Alamogordo city council has given the Los Angeles-based Fuel Entertainment permission to search the site for a film project and find out if one of the videogame industry’s most enduring myths is fact or fiction. “The dumping of the E.T. cartridges has always been one of the biggest urban legends in videogame history,” says Mike Burns, cofounder and CEO of Fuel Entertainment’s parent company, Fuel Industries. “We wanted to find out what’s really in there and put an end to the rumors.”

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Richard Matheson, author, screenplay writer, and science fiction legend, dies at age 87

It is ironic that one of the books author Richard Matheson, who has died at the age of 87 according to publisher Tor/Forge, is best known for is 1956′s The Shrinking Man. While that novel related the tale of a person diminishing away to virtually nothing, Matheson’s influence on the science fiction genre continues to grow more than a half century after the book’s publication. Just last week saw the release of World War Z, a film which owes a huge debt to George A. Romero’s classic 1968 film Night of the Living Dead and hence to Matheson’s similarly revered 1954 tome I Am Legend, to which Romero paid extremely generous homage in his film. Maybe too generous, according to Matheson himself. In 2007, the Allendale, N.J.-born writer told me with a chuckle about the time he met Romero for lunch. “The first thing he said to me, putting his arms up as if I was abut to strike him, [was], ‘Didn’t make any money from Night of the Living Dead,’” Matheson recalled. “‘Homage’ means I get to steal you work. He’s a nice guy, though. I don’t harbor any animosity toward him.” (Romero later confirmed this story:  “I confessed to him that I basically ripped the idea off from I Am Legend. He forgave me because we didn’t make any money. He said, ‘Well, as long as you didn’t get rich, it’s okay.’”)
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Previewing this week's 'Entertainment Weirdly' show on Sirius XM: Miley, 'Maniac,' and a one-ton musical monkey

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What do Miley Cyrus’ latest video, Elijah Wood’s just-out slasher flick Maniac, and Sarah McLachlan’s decision to write the songs for a stage musical of King Kong have in common? That’s right, they all feature in my forthcoming YA novel Harry Everdeen and the Terrifying Acid Trip (soon to be a major motion picture and/or massive law suit). But they are also all subjects which will be discussed in this week’s edition of Entertainment Weirdly, which is broadcast on Entertainment Weekly Radio, Sirius XM 105, at 1pm ET this afternoon.

Join myself, Darren Franich, and Keith Staskiewicz as we ruminate on the latest strange pop culture shenanigans, recommend a range of oddball malarkey, and mark the release of World War Z by playing an all-zombie movie version of our Christmas present must-have in-the-making game Death Jam.

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'The Walking Dead': Save for the apocalypse with the Rick Grimes bust bank -- EXCLUSIVE IMAGE

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It is widely assumed that when the inevitable zombie apocalypse finally occurs, survivors will revert back to a barter economy as we exchange, say, bottled water for scythes and dead crows. (Mmm, dead crow stew.) But what if money is still worth something? How will you store all your change in a way that will also remind you that you could get eaten while on the way to buy something to eat? Walking Dead writer Robert Kirkman‘s Skybound imprint has the answer.

On Tuesday, the company announced that Walking Dead fans will soon be able to buy an 8-inch Rick Grimes bust bank, which you can exclusively see above and which alert readers will notice is based on the comic version of the zombie-battler rather than the as-played-by-Andrew-Lincoln TV one (the clue is in the number of hands he has left).
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'Doctor Who': Which actor (or actress) should replace Matt Smith in the TARDIS?

When I interviewed Doctor Who star Matt Smith at the end of last year, talk inevitably turned to the temporary nature of portraying the show’s semi-titular Time Lord, whose powers of regeneration have enabled an array of people to play the part since the British sci-fi series debuted almost 50 years ago. “One day you will be sat opposite another Doctor,” Smith said wistfully. “You will be cheating on me! Right? You will be. And I will expect you to always speak fondly of me…”

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Spocks United: Leonard Nimoy and Zachary Quinto meld a friendship for the ages

Star Trek fans everywhere have been watching, sharing and re-watching The Challenge, a sly Audi ad that, as a comedy vehicle, comfortably seats a pair of mismatched Spocks: Leonard Nimoy, the television and sci-fi icon, and his on-screen heir, Zachary Quinto, who wears the ears in Star Trek Into Darkness.

They are trash-talking frenemies in the mini-movie, but Trek producer Bryan Burke says that in grand Spock tradition there’s a vast emotion hidden behind that frosty artifice.”Their relationship is not a working relationship at all,” Burke said.  “They’re family.”

As Hollywood relationships go, the bond between Nimoy and Quinto is an anomaly. Not only does it bridge a vast generation gap (Nimoy is 82, Quinto is 35), it defies the Hollywood undertows of rivalry and status anxiety, which have made actors in similar situation behave like Betta fish when paired up.

”We spend a lot of time together, we keep in touch,” Quinto said in February just a few days after he filmed the Audi ad. “He’s a great friend. I value his presence in my life far beyond the experience we had making the first Star Trek movie and I’m grateful that it brought us together but now the friendship is a thing — it’s own thing. I love Leonard a lot.” READ FULL STORY

'Star Trek' Poster Project: Do you want 'Spock's Brain' on your wall?

Acclaimed artist/designer Juan Ortiz continues his great commission to express his Star Trek love by creating retro pulpy movie posters for every single episode of Star Trek: The Original Series. This month’s batch includes “Requiem of Methuselah” (season 3, episode 19), a Trek gloss on Shakespeare’s The Tempest, in which the crew of the Enterprise becomes afflicted with ADHD Rigellian Fever and has to score some Ritalin Ryetalyn from an immortal named Flint; and “Spock’s Brain” (season 3, episode 1), which is considered one of the stupidest episodes of ST:TOS ever. (“Brain and brain! What is brain!?”)

Wrote Leonard Nimoy in I Am Spock: “Frankly, during the entire shooting of that episode, I was embarrassed — a feeling that overcame me many times during the final season of Star Trek.” Smart looking print, though. READ FULL STORY

'Star Trek' creator's son: The Enterprise's best destiny is TV and online, not movie screen

It was almost 50 years ago that Gene Roddenberry began developing Star Trek and its tales of the ever-rational United Federation of Planets (which values connection and communication above conquest) and noble, shining Starfleet (which devotes its powerful engines to exploration and insight).

Those concepts launched one of the most persistent mythologies in American pop culture (on television alone there have been six series with 700-plus episodes over 30 years) and they seem to echo also in Trek Initiative, a just-announced venture from Roddenberry Entertainment that is taking a Starfleet approach to the a unruly universe known as the Internet.

“We have wanted to do something to unite all of the fans for years,” says Rod Roddenberry, son of the late Star Trek creator. “There’s tons of information out there. We don’t need to provide content, we just need to unite them. Whether it’s fan films, fan fiction, just people connecting to talk about the future … we wanted to provide a place where people from all walks of life can connect over a passion for Star Trek or a passion for the future.”

Announced at the Chicago Comic & Entertainment Expo, Trek Initiative is a sleek new portal that aims to connect and curate the vast amount of Starfleet content that fills the cyber constellations. The site represents the new partnership of Roddenberry Entertainment and Wikia, which is already in Federation space in a big way — its Memory Alpha is among its 31 Star Trek sites representing 11 languages, 165,000 pages and 9.4 million page views per month. READ FULL STORY

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