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Tag: Sci-Fi (91-100 of 629)

Producers Guild to honor Steven Spielberg: But what took so long?

Steven Spielberg will receive the 2012 David O. Selznick Achievement Award in Motion Pictures from the Producers Guild of America next January. And while the Guild is falling all over itself to congratulate the filmmaker, calling him “one of the most prolific filmmakers of all time,” whose “continued genius, imagination and fearlessness in the world of feature film entertainment is unmatched in this industry,” you have to wonder why it’s taken the PGA so long.

Spielberg made Jaws nearly four decades ago. READ FULL STORY

In a fight, how will 'Real Steel' compare to your favorite robot movies?

In Hollywood, only evil robots are truly robotic. For every relentless killing machine, like the ones depicted in the Terminator franchise, there are scores of “clinking, clanking, clattering collections of caliginous junk” who reveal that humanity isn’t exclusively human. In fact, some robots prove to be more humane than their creators. Hence, the key to a great robot movie it to convey something true about our flesh-and-bone selves. Orrrrrr… to shatter the eyeballs of the audience with a CG-enhanced wargasm of violence with apocalyptic ramifications. The best robot movies, actually, do both, marrying the spectacular with the profound. It’s not an easy task, but Real Steel, Hugh Jackman’s robot-boxing movie that opens in theaters Oct. 7, aims to connect on both accounts. Atom, the underdog robot Jackson’s over-the-hill pug teaches to be a prizefighter, resembles the Iron Giant and seems to have the heart of a champion.

But will the movie ultimately take its place in the class of the greatest robot movies of all time? How will it compare with Terminator 2: Judgment Day — chosen for this poll over its predecessor because it features two battling robots — or the sublimely poetic WALL•E? What is your favorite robot movie ever made? Vote below. READ FULL STORY

'Space Cases': If you remember this show, I'm impressed.

Space-Cases

I wondered if I was perhaps writing about too obscure of a show when I covered The Mystery Files of Shelby Woo for EW’s ongoing nostalgia series on Saturday. Would anyone actually remember it? Thankfully, a few people did.

But things are about to get a whole lot more obscure. Today, I’m talking about Space Cases.

What, you don’t remember Space Cases? You know, that sci-fi show about a group of teenage space dwellers traveling through the universe that ran on Nickelodeon for two seasons. You’ve gotta remember it! No? It was that show which featured a girl with rainbow hair, a guy with giant whirlpool ears, and a pessimistic alien with a glittery wishbone glued on his forehead. Still nothing? READ FULL STORY

'Torchwood' season finale: Blood is thicker than logic, or 'Death Wish V: The Face of Death'

Based on that globetrotting, apocalypse-flirting season finale of Torchwood, it’s hard to believe that this series began as just a Doctor Who spinoff on BBC Three about a black ops unit fighting aliens in apparently extraterrestrial-packed Cardiff, Wales. No, it still hasn’t come close to fulfilling its original mandate to give a more “adult” spin to the Who formula. Not by a mile. But what Torchwood still lacks in maturity it almost makes up with sheer expansiveness.

Take Series Four, subtitled “Miracle Day,” which wrapped up last night. It was in some respects a season-long deconstruction of most television series’ biggest conceit: that your main characters are never going to die, or at least have a much, much lower mortality rate than the general population. On the titular Miracle Day, not a single human being on the planet died. But then, none died on the day after, or the day after that, and so on, like some cancerous antipode to Children of Men’s sterility epidemic. After that non-Apocalypse Apocalypse, humanity became an immortal race of gods subjected to an increasingly crowded planet—except for those “Category One” individuals who should have died but haven’t and now linger on in some kind of limbo. READ FULL STORY

Fall TV Math: A look at four of this season's new shows. How do they add up?

Preparing for fall TV is a truly confusing time. Finding a balance between the shows you love and the shows you’d like to try to love, filling holes in your TV schedule with new offerings, and giving advanced notice to friends that you will be cutting off all in-person communication with the world for the next 9 months is all very exhausting. (Click here to see how you can prepare for a TV season that threatens your social life.) What makes it harder to plan is that you have no idea what to expect from new shows. That’s where I come in.

Now, I’m not claiming to be a know-it-all, more like a know-some. After viewing hours and hours of pilots, I want to help sort the madness. So here are four shows that I was curious about going into the new season and some info that I hope helps you decide whether or not it’s your cup of tea.

Hart of Dixie (CW, Sept. 26) = [Everwood appeal x the south] + O.C.-style love entanglements + Rachel effing Bilson
The pilot for this CW show is so much of what we’ve seen before… in the best possible way. READ FULL STORY

'Apollo 18' blasts off into theaters this weekend: What's your favorite scared-in-space movie?

apollo-18-02

You remember the old tag line, courtesy of the classic 1979 sci-fi thriller Alien, “In space, no one can hear you scream”? While that may be true (I’ve never been to space, but I can say with the utmost certainty, I would freak out to deaf ears the entire time), people can most definitely hear you scream when you’re in a movie theater watching a freaky flick set in the infinite galaxy.

With Apollo 18 arriving this weekend, moviegoers will feel as trapped in their theaters as the unfortunate fellows aboard that secret space mission. READ FULL STORY

Carrie Fisher on 'Today': 'I want to get back into the metal bikini'

Carrie Fisher, Star Wars star and Jenny Craig spokeswoman who lost 50 pounds in the past nine months, appeared on Today this morning to talk to Ann Curry about diets, aging, her legacy, and yada yada yada, let’s get talking about that important line! At 4:20 in the video embedded after the jump — fittingly following a brief and funny conversation about a type of marijuana called Princess Leia — the actress drops a sentence that could melt carbonite: “I want to get back into the metal bikini.” Use the force to make it happen, Star Wars fanatics! READ FULL STORY

What does the cancellation of 'Eureka' mean for SyFy's future?

The news that Syfy has canceled Eureka would have already been disappointing to fans — particularly since the network also backtracked on an earlier plan to order a shortened sixth season. But more than a few viewers are taking the news as evidence that the network formerly (and more accurately) known as the Sci-Fi Channel is suffering from an existential crisis. Commenter Doug sardonically voices the complaint of several EW readers when he says, “Now they have room for another Wrestling show or ‘Reality’ paranormal special.” Exombre notes: “MTV doesn’t show videos anymore, why should ‘Syfy’ have any legitimate science fiction?” Is Syfy having an identity crisis? READ FULL STORY

'Star Trek' theme park being developed in Jordan: What's your ride wish-list? We'll tell you ours!

Set phasers for fun! That’s because Star Trek’s getting the theme park treatment in Aqaba, Jordan. Set to begin construction in March 2012, the Red Sea Astrarium, a $1.5 billion development comprised of four hotels and 17 amusement-park-style attractions, will feature a Star Trek-themed entertainment center, including a “space-flight adventure” simulator ride (a la Disney’s Star Tours) based on the 45-year-old franchise.

Puzzled by Starfleet’s incursion into Jordan? READ FULL STORY

'Captain America' reaction: Do you want more of Marvel's new movie hero? And about that ending...

Where and when will Captain America fight again now that Marvel Studios has launched the super-soldier as a cinematic superhero franchise? We know that Chris Evans’ shield-baring hero will become a charter member of director Joss Whedon’s The Avengers opening next summer. (What did you think of that teaser-trailer?) But think beyond that. With box office pundits currently predicting that Captain America: The First Avenger will generate a bigger opening weekend than Marvel’s sequel-bound summertime smash Thor, another dedicated Captain America adventure would seem inevitable. (The writers of the first film, Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely, are already working on a script.) But where in the world – and where in history – will the masked marvel find himself in his next big-screen outing?

If you’ve seen Captain America: The First Avenger (and MASSIVE SPOILERS loom ahead for anyone who hasn’t), you know that the movie concluded with the World War II hero crashing the Red Skull’s stealth-winged flying fortress in the Arctic, then waking up in present day New York City. The implication: Steve Rogers was frozen alive and then discovered, thawed and revived by agents of SHIELD, the super-secret espionage outfit run by Samuel L. Jackson’s Nick Fury. We might assume that future stories will track the time-tossed patriot’s attempts to adjust to the modern world, plus battle other old WWII foes that somehow, someway also managed to cheat death. (I really want to see Toby Jones’ Arnim Zola make this bizarre, life-extending transformation.)

And yet, the movie never gave us the visual that most Marvel fanboys were expecting: A shot of Captain America trapped in ice. We saw his vibranium shield excavated from the Skull’s snow-filled bomber – but no body. All we got was a long beat of black screen between Cap’s crash in the Arctic and NYC wake-up. (Unless I dozed off and missed it; I saw a midnight screening after a long day at Comic-Con.)

READ FULL STORY

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