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Tag: Quentin Tarantino (1-10 of 42)

Quentin Tarantino's favorite movies of 2013 so far include 'Before Midnight,' 'Gravity,' 'Kick-Ass 2'

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Quentin Tarantino has yet to announce his next movie, presumably because he is currently laying back in a swimming pool filled with Django Unchained money, or perhaps putting on a gory three-hour puppet show using his Django Unchained Oscar and his Django Unchained Golden Globe. But the director has found time to watch plenty of movies this year. The Quentin Tarantino Archives has a list of Tarantino’s Top Ten Movies of 2013 — with the addendum “so far,” since the year is after all only 3/4 over and for all we know Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit will be good. READ FULL STORY

Oscar pool be darned! Which winners would make for the best television on Sunday night?

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With only 55 hours until the 84th annual Academy Awards, there is a subtle shift that takes place where the event suddenly becomes less about the movies we’re supposed to be celebrating and more about the television show itself. Who’s presenting? How will Seth MacFarlane be received? Will Sean Connery be part of the James Bond tribute? Who will be bleeped for profanity?

For months, I’ve debated the merits of the top films, and my choices for the major awards have been etched in cement that dried long before the Golden Globes were even handed out. Lincoln was and is my favorite (this Oscars is as close as I’ll ever come to voting the straight Republican ticket), but now, I find myself pulled in a different direction. The question isn’t necessarily, “Who deserves to win?” but rather, “Whose victory and subsequent acceptance speech will make for the best television?” As someone who’s watched every Oscar ceremony on television since 1983 — I was a disappointed Right Stuff guy then, even though I’d yet to see it or any of its rival Best Picture nominees that year — I am not immune from these forces.

Click below for my list of who I want to see win the major categories, ignoring the actual on-screen performances and based purely on my existence as a couch-potato and Oscar broadcast nerd. These aren’t the selections to refer to when you’re filling out your Oscar pool, but don’t be surprised if they correspond with ABC’s hopes and dreams. READ FULL STORY

PopWatch Confessional: What movie has made you hide your eyes the longest?

I love action movies, but I don’t like the sight or sound of breaking bones. That’s why I couldn’t watch the mandingo fight in Django Unchained. Wanting to not draw attention to the fact that I was a wimp, I didn’t bury my head in my hands or someone’s shoulder; I just sat there, perfectly upright, and closed my eyes. As the cracking began, I thought about plugging my ears with my fingers, but since that would also give me away, I just kept repeating “This will end, it’s just a movie” in my head, calmly, so my face wouldn’t wince and telecast my squeamishness. It’s realizing that I had enough time to weigh these options that makes me think this is probably the longest I’ve ever averted my eyes in a movie.

Because I am a wimp and don’t subject myself to many horror (or otherwise graphic) films, I’m curious: What movie has made you hide your eyes the longest? A few confessions from my colleagues, then it’s your turn: READ FULL STORY

Daniel Day-Lewis as Vincent Vega? 10 things we learned from the 'Pulp Fiction' oral history

How much would Pulp Fiction’s “cool” factor suffer if Samuel L. Jackson weren’t the one reciting Ezekiel 25:17? Apparently, we came dangerously close to finding out …

Vanity Fair‘s oral history of Quentin Tarantino’s hit film reveals a few things you might not know about the movie, from casting news to Bruce Willis’ influence. Here’s what we learned: READ FULL STORY

2 Live Crew's Luther Campbell bashes Spike Lee for 'Django Unchained' diss

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Last month, Spike Lee attacked Quentin Tarantino’s Django Unchained, tweeting that “American slavery was not a Sergio Leone Spaghetti Western. It was a Holocaust.” It didn’t inspire much controversy, possibly because the whole Lee/Tarantino Auteurist Feud feels so 1997. Nevertheless, just a few days after Tarantino lobbed an n-bomb in the press room at the Golden Globes — the equivalent of shouting “fire” in a theater crowded with reporters who are all carrying flamethrowers — an important cultural voice has weighed in on Lee’s Django critique. In his column for the Miami New Times, former 2 Live Crew frontman takes Lee to task for his statements. (Revelation: Luther Campbell has a column!) Some key lines: READ FULL STORY

Golden Globes 2013: After-parties boast celebs from Quentin Tarantino to Selena Gomez

Near-freezing temps were no match for Sunday night Globe winners such as Quentin Tarantino and celebrities like Selena Gomez, who were determined to keep the party going following the 70th annual Golden Globe Awards.

Full of booze and ravenous for food, stars flocked to several bashes at the Beverly Hilton Hotel just after the awards ceremony, from HBO’s soiree at the downstairs Circa 55 restaurant and The Weinstein Company’s party at the old Trader Vic’s, to the NBC-Focus Features-Universal’s rooftop shindig, Warner Bros. InStyle‘s huge party in the Oasis Courtyard, and Fox’s tented bash just outside the hotel.

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Quentin Tarantino, Don Cheadle use the n-word backstage at Globes

It wasn’t an F-bomb that set off a gasp in the press room at the Golden Globe Awards on Sunday night, it was the n-word. Quentin Tarantino employed the controversial term in the context of discussing his film, Django Unchained, for which the writer/director won best screenplay. The movie, which employs the slur over and over again in the course of its 165 minutes, has struck controversy in the African American community for its portrayal of a slave-turned-bounty hunter in antebellum Mississippi.

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Quentin Tarantino refuses to answer questions about movie violence: 'I'm not your slave!' -- VIDEO

Note to interviewers: Quentin Tarantino is really, really sick of your questions about the violence in his movies. So sick, in fact, that the Django Unchained director flat-out refused to answer when British TV newsman Krishnan Guru-Murthy recently asked him why he’s so sure that there’s no link between people who enjoy watching violent movies and people who enjoy committing violent acts in real life.

“Don’t ask me a question like that. I’m not biting. I refuse your question,” Tarantino shot back. Why? “Because I refuse your question,” he continued. “I’m not your slave and you’re not my master. Don’t make me dance to your tune. I’m not a monkey.”

That’s right: The guy who made a movie about the horrific experiences of American slavery just compared himself to a slave and his interviewer to an imperious plantation owner. Eeesh.

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Golden Globes: Who will win in the movie categories? Polls!

With separate categories for drama and comedy or musical, the Golden Globes won’t exactly predict how much Oscar competition Les Miserables‘ Hugh Jackman is for Lincoln‘s Daniel Day-Lewis, but look on the bright side: We have an interesting acceptance speech to look forward to if the Best Director award goes to one of the Oscar-snubbed — Argo‘s Ben Affleck, Zero Dark Thirty‘s Kathryn Bigelow, or Django Unchained‘s Quentin Tarantino. Who will win in the Globes’ 14 movie categories? Let’s take it to a vote below. Remember, this is who you think will win, not necessarily who you think should win.  READ FULL STORY

'Django Unchained' isn't the only film about American slavery, but it's close

Slavery remains American’s original sin, written into the original U.S. Constitution and responsible for the country’s ever-evolving, ever-complicated attitudes about race. So when a director like Quentin Tarantino decides to use slavery as the backdrop for his spaghetti Western revenge fantasia Django Unchained, it should not be exactly surprising that the film has come under a great deal of scrutiny.

What should be surprising — what should be at the center of any conversation about slavery and the movies — is how infrequently the words “slavery and the movies” are spoken in the same sentence.

Last month, Spike Lee declared he would not see Django Unchained, tweeting “American Slavery Was Not A Sergio Leone Spaghetti Western. It Was A Holocaust” — a not so subtle implication that American slavery is too fraught to serve as a venue for Tarantino’s unique blend of genre-smashing, blood-splattering filmmaking. Training Day director Antoine Fuqua later admonished Lee for not airing his beef with Tarantino in private, declaring “I don’t think Quentin Tarantino has a racist bone in his body.” (When reached by EW, a rep for The Weinstein Company and Tarantino had no comment regarding either statement.) But Spike Lee is far from alone in expressing concerns about Tarantino’s tale of the titular freed slave (Jamie Foxx) who teams up with a German bounty hunter (Christoph Waltz) to rescue his wife (Kerry Washington) from a nefarious slaveholder (Leonardo DiCaprio). The public handwringing over the film has included its profligate use of the N-word (sparking a most fascinating exchange between Samuel L. Jackson and a white journalist over speaking the word aloud); its impact among African-American cultural tastemakers and audiences; and its appropriateness for teenage audiences (as penned by EW’s Abby West).

None of the controversies have exactly harmed the film’s box office; quite the opposite, it just zoomed past $100 million this weekend, en route to becoming Tarantino’s biggest hit to date. READ FULL STORY

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