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Tag: New York Times (1-6 of 6)

James Franco rants about 'New York Times' review on Instagram

When the New York Times didn’t give James Franco the glowing Of Mice and Men review he wanted, the actor took to his favorite hangout, Instagram, to express his displeasure.

The show opened Wednesday night on Broadway, with Franco starring as George opposite Chris O’Dowd’s Lennie. It seems Franco spent this morning reading over reviews — including Times theater critic Ben Brantley’s evaluation. Although Brantley didn’t outright insult Franco, or even write anything overwhelmingly negative — in fact, he complimented Franco’s talent, but noted that the star is “often understated to the point of near invisibility” in the play — Franco still wasn’t pleased.

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James Franco reflects on Broadway debut: 'I have a good life'

James Franco seems to have hit a rare stride in life — that is, he’s found happiness. That’s right: The laid-back thespian who epitomizes an off-beat brand of Hollywood cool has settled into a stage where life is “good.”

It’s not exactly what one might have expected from the characteristically aloof Northern California native, but Franco shared plenty of surprises at a TimesTalks event on March 7 in New York City, offering insight on everything from life, film, and even academia. Taking the stage to discuss Of Mice and Men – Franco’s Broadway debut — with co-star Chris O’Dowd, the 35-year-old actor dropped a few interesting and laugh-out-loud gems worth sharing. READ FULL STORY

James Franco explains 'why actors act out' in 'New York Times' essay about Shia LaBeouf

James Franco has been known to make some dubious professional choices, from acting on General Hospital at the height of his career to his ill-received gig co-hosting the Oscars alongside Anne Hathaway. So it’s no surprise that he can relate to Shia LaBeouf’s recent string of bizarre behavior — ever since the Transformers star was accused of plagiarizing his short film HowardCantour.com back in December — and Franco put that empathy into a New York Times essay that went online Wednesday night.

“This behavior could be a sign of many things, from a nervous breakdown to mere youthful recklessness,” Franco writes. “For Mr. LaBeouf’s sake I hope it is nothing serious. Indeed I hope — and, yes, I know that this idea has pretentious or just plain ridiculous overtones — that his actions are intended as a piece of performance art, one in which a young man in a very public profession tries to reclaim his public persona.” READ FULL STORY

Miley Cyrus says she's playing a character, doesn't understand why flashing is a big deal

If you’re someone still trying to figure out the mind of Miley Cyrus, a new New York Times interview may help. You weren’t supposed to take her VMA performance as a declaration of her lifestyle: “I went from people just thinking I was, like, a baby to people thinking I’m this, like, sex freak that really just pops molly and does lines all day. It’s like, ‘Has anyone ever heard of rock ’n’ roll?’ There’s a sex scene in pretty much every single movie, and they go, ‘Well, that’s a character.’ Well, that’s a character. I don’t really dress as a teddy bear and, like, twerk on Robin Thicke, you know?”

Other revelations: According to Cyrus, it’s not just former Disney stars who are forced to be PG rather than themselves. “I’ll get someone to, like, flash me, and they’ll be, like, ‘You have to delete it!’ I had to do that when I was 14 or 15, but even then I didn’t care. Like, if someone was videoing me ripping a bong, I didn’t care, so it’s just funny to me. I’m like: ‘Dude, you’re 30. Like, why can’t someone see a picture of your [breasts]?’” (Since when is marketability the only reason NOT to want your breasts exposed, Miley?) READ FULL STORY

Maria Bello describes falling for a woman in 'Modern Love' column

In a new “Modern Love” column, actress Maria Bello describes her relationship with a woman named Clare — which she began after a lifetime of dating mostly men and one other woman.

Bello says that she and Clare met two years before they became romantically involved, eventually becoming best friends. After an epiphany brought on by old photo albums and journals — “It didn’t occur to me, until that soul-searching moment in my garden, that we could perhaps choose to love each other romantically” — Bello shared her “confusing feelings” with her closest pal. After that, she writes, she and Clare “began the long, painful, wonderful process of trying to figure out what our relationship was supposed to be.”

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Bradley Cooper, Cate Blanchett, and Oprah star in 'whimsical' New York Times movie shorts

A Script, a Performer, and a Camera. Technically, that’s all you need to make a movie. But that formula is so much more fun when the script is written by the likes of Spike Jonze and J.C. Chandor, the actors include Bradley Cooper and Cate Blanchett, and the filmmaker is Oscar-winning cinematographer Janusz Kaminski.

The New York Times paired together some of the year’s top moviemaking talent for their Movies Issue, and handed them to Kaminski to make 11 original short films. “Most of the vignettes are slightly whimsical and off-center,” said Kaminski in a short behind-the-scene video (see below).

In the shorts, Robert Redford briefly explains his feelings for tofu, Michael B. Jordan plays an existential cowboy, and Blue is the Warmest Color‘s Adèle Exarchopoulos jumps up and down on a trampoline (making the argument that a Script isn’t exactly the cinematic equal of Performer and a Camera.)

Click below to see two of the shorts, starring Oprah Winfrey and Chiwetel Ejiofor, as well as the behind the scenes video. Then click over to the Times “Making a Scene” hub to see the other nine. READ FULL STORY

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