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Tag: Netflix (41-50 of 72)

'House of Cards,' episodes 9 and 10: We all fall down

Correction: We all fall down, except Frank Underwood, who will be the only human keeping the cockroaches company after the apocalypse. And those cockroaches will quickly learn to do his bidding, or else.

Chapter 8 of House of Cards ends with Frank apparently foiled, while Chapter 9 pushes things even further when Frank’s nearest and dearest begin to rebel against him — though like a barbecue-loving cat, Rep. Underwood obviously ends up landing on his feet. We’ll see if he can keep that perch in season 1’s last three episodes, which may or may not feature the death of a major character.

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'House of Cards,' episodes 7 and 8: The rise of Peter Russo

First and foremost, EW.com would like to congratulate our fictional, unnamed head editor — a man who apparently will be hired by Washington, D.C.’s most prestigious fake newspaper sometime this spring. (House of Cards tells the future, y’all.) Even if snooty political reporter Janine doesn’t think a stint at this website qualifies one to run the Washington Herald, we believe that experiences gained here would absolutely translate to an imaginary newsroom.

Anyway: House of Cards loses a bit of steam in this pair of episodes, which find Peter Russo throwing himself into his new campaign and Frank wistfully visiting his alma mater. This slight slow-down wouldn’t be so obvious in a show that aired once a week; episodes that forgo plot for character development certainly have their place, as anyone who’s enjoyed Breaking Bad‘s “Fly” or Mad Men‘s “The Suitcase” would know. But in a show designed to be watched all at once — or as close to “all at once” as possible — storyline naturally takes precedence over anything else. House of Cards only really works if it can hook its viewers so thoroughly that they simply can’t wait to watch its next installment, and by that criteria, chapters 7 and 8 fall short.

Still, there’s plenty of good stuff here — thanks mostly to Russo, who’s transforming quickly from ambivalent, underachieving congressman to smooth gubernatorial candidate.  READ FULL STORY

'House of Cards,' episodes 5 and 6: Strikes, 'Slugline,' and the worst bath ever

In the fifth and sixth episodes of House of Cards, the series’s plot begins to thicken like the glaze on Freddy’s ribs. These hours give us more insight into the Underwoods’ twisted marriage, show a turning point for poor Peter Russo, and present something we never could have seen coming — Frank faltering in a very public way.

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Your port in the storm: Ride out Nemo with these streaming selections

Did congressman Frank Underwood manipulate Mother Nature into unleashing Winter Storm Nemo? If you’ve been watching Netflix’s House of Cards, you’ll know that Kevin Spacey’s character is capable of pretty much anything — and if you haven’t been watching it (but happen to live on the East Coast), whaddaya know, the ginormous blizzard currently barreling toward you will give you the perfect opportunity to start. Frank, you sly dog!

Of course, if you don’t want to give Rep. Underwood the satisfaction of victory, you can always ditch House of Cards for any number of other streaming options perfect for binge-viewing. Here’s a list of our top picks:

- In May, new episodes of Arrested Development will finally hit Netflix, possibly causing the Internet to implode from excitement. Revisit the comedy’s original three seasons there to prepare for what’s coming.

- Breaking Bad‘s final season will draw to a close on AMC this summer. If you’re not caught up (or — for shame! — never started watching), now’s your chance to fix that via Netflix.

- And on a similar note, Downton Abbey‘s first two series seasons are on Hulu, and PBS.org has every episode of the current third season. (Well, every one that’s aired in the U.S., at least.) READ FULL STORY

'House of Cards,' episodes 3 and 4: Are you all in?

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Netflix’s new political thriller House of Cards is designed for binge-viewing, which makes it great for consumers who enjoy watching TV at their own pace — and less great for writers accustomed to dissecting shows hour by hour and week by week. By now, some of you have likely watched House‘s whole 13-episode first season already; others are halfway done, or a few episodes in, or waiting to blow through the entire thing in one marathon viewing session. So what’s a recapper to do?

Since Ken Tucker already covered the first two episodes of the series in his initial review, we’re going to dive right in and discuss its next two installments here. (We’ll tackle 5 and 6 next Wednesday.) If nothing else, this pair of episodes does seem a good place to pause and take stock of the series thus far — especially given the second hour’s doozy of an ending. This should go without saying, but just to be safe: spoilers follow, y’all.

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'Arrested Development': Conan O'Brien tweets first official photo from the new episodes

Today’s news: it’s not all doom and gloom and flying cows! This morning, Conan O’Brien tweeted what he’s calling the “first official photo from the new Arrested Development.” It’s sure to cheer up any Hurricane Sandy-struck AD fans who feel like they’re about to blue themselves. Here’s the shot:

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Hulu might restrict access to those with cable subscriptions -- eventually

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Here’s some potentially bad news for cable cutters: The New York Post writes that free streaming site Hulu might eventually become a Pay-TV-subscribers-only zone. Last fall, Fox began limiting access to its most popular series on Hulu; while Dish TV, Verizon Fios, and Hulu Plus subscribers can still watch shows like Glee the day after they air, everyone else must wait an additional eight days if they want to view for free.

And according to the Post, this “authentication” model — so-called because viewers without Hulu Plus get next-day access to Fox shows by logging in with a Dish or Verizon account number — may soon become more common across the site. The paper reports that Comcast could introduce authentication for its subscribers in the near future. That cable network is reportedly going to require authentication for those who wish to watch Summer 2012 Olympics coverage as well.

Anyone who doesn’t currently pay for cable or satellite TV shouldn’t necessarily worry. READ FULL STORY

Various crazy schemes can't prevent Netflix shares from plunging

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I have a theory about why everything has gone wrong with the once-beloved, now-maligned Netflix. In simple terms: They were Scrooge McDuck, and they decided that they wanted to be the Beagle Boys — the gang of hoodlum bank robbers who conceive crazy schemes to rob Scrooge McDuck. One year ago, Netflix was practicing a grateful backstroke through a mountain of money. There was some trouble on the horizon, of course. Content providers were starting to create their own video-streaming services, and mailing DVDs was costly, and users would fly into a blind rage whenever the site slightly updated its interface. Scrooge McDuck constantly faces down threats from competitors like Flintheart Glomgold (Amazon Instant Video) or people who want to undermine his business model, like Magica DeSpell (Starz’ decision to remove its content from Netflix). There were ways to solve these problems. Netflix had an adoring constituency. Everyone you knew was watching Party Down. Your parents were starting to use “Netflix” as a verb. READ FULL STORY

Celebrate 4/20 with these highly recommended streaming picks

Dude. It’s 4:20pm… on 4/20. Are you as hungry as I am?

After getting all your afternoon snacks in order, consider celebrating this auspicious day with one (or more) of these, er, green-friendly streaming picks. Each one can be viewed from the comfort of your own couch — though you might want to pull out a fan before you start watching. Otherwise, certain hazy elements might make it tough to see your computer screen.

Marley

As of today, this 144-minute documentary about the reggae legend is officially available On Demand, on iTunes, and streaming on Facebook. When we asked a rep from Ziggy Marley’s production company why the producers chose this particular release date, she noted that it’s Bob’s son Stephen’s birthday, and that April 20th also “happens to fall on Friday, which is usually when movies come out.” Suuuure, that’s why.

Dazed & Confused

Our #1 favorite stoner movie is available on Netflix for your viewing pleasure. And it’s not alone — half-baked classics like Clerks, Reefer Madness, Super Troopers, and The Big Lebowski can also be placed in your Instant Queue. (Half Baked itself, unfortunately, can’t be.) READ FULL STORY

New streaming titles: Johnny Depp goes West in 'Rango,' Taylor Swift gets 'Fearless'

Did you know that 68% of date nights take place on the couch in front of a wall-mounted TV? No, you didn’t, because I made that up. But it seems increasingly apparent that more people are using their weekends to stay in and snuggle (either with a partner, a posse, or themselves) while binging on some of streaming’s finest. If your weekend date with Netflix is hopelessly unplanned, let EW help you track down some of this week’s best new streaming additions:

New on Netflix*: Movies

Rango (2011) – Johnny Depp, Isla Fisher, Abigail Breslin – PG, 107 minutes, Animated
Gore Verbinski’s lively story of a suburban lizard (Johnny Depp) who winds up in the wild vermin-filled west won the Oscar for Best Animated Film this year. Don’t let the cutesy chameleon look fool you: Rango is fast, funny and filled to the brim with typical Depp mannerisms (and one heck of a cameo).

Risky Business (1983) – Tom Cruise, Rebecca De Mornay – R, 98 minutes, Comedy

Pay It Forward (2000) – Kevin Spacey, Helen Hunt, Haley Joel Osment – PG-13, 123 minutes, Drama

Bonnie and Clyde (1967) – Warren Beatty, Faye Dunaway – R, 110 minutes, Action/Crime  READ FULL STORY

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