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Tag: Mockingjay (1-10 of 17)

This week in Sound Bites: LeVar Burton, 'Scandal,' 'Mockingjay,' and more

Every week in Sound Bites, EW spotlights the most memorable lines of the week. This week features LeVar Burton on The Big Bang Theory, Mellie (Bellamy Young) taking on Elizabeth (Portia de Rossi) for swapping lovers on Scandal, and an a solemn Effie Trinket (Elizabeth Banks) on her incarceration in Mockingjay.

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Entertainment Geekly Mailbag: 'Mockingjay' talkback and a defense of 'Assassin's Creed'

Katniss

Big week for explosive arrows! Last week I reviewed Far Cry 4, one of the best videogames I’ve played this year; I also saw The Hunger Games—Mockingjay: Part 1, one of the best non-movies I’ve seen this year. Readers responded with their thoughts about Ubisoft’s franchises and some deep thoughts about the state of moviemaking. If you want to join the conversation, or just want to tell me I’m wrong, email me at darren_franich@ew.com. READ FULL STORY

'The Hunger Games' star Willow Shields, Michael Fassbender, and James McAvoy walk into an elevator and...

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After a huge opening weekend for The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, it seems Willow Shields’ days of hobnobbing with A-listers are far from over.

While taking EW‘s Pop Culture Personality Test, Shields—who plays Primrose Everdeen, the younger sister of Jennifer Lawrence’s heroine Katniss—recalled having a fan-girly run-in with Michael Fassbender and James McAvoy at San Diego Comic-Con. There was even a little danger involved.

Watch the video below to find out out what made Shields’ heart race (other than the X-Men stars), then read on for a full transcript and more of Shields’ insights on Prim’s beefed-up part in the new film. (Warning for those who haven’t seen the third Hunger Games installment: Stop reading now if you don’t want to know details from Mockingjay — Part 1.)

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PopWatch Confessional: What makes you embrace your inner badass?

Let’s face it: If you spend your days voluntarily staring at a variety of glowing rectangles, chances are you’re probably not much of a daredevil. That said, the things you’re seeing and hearing via those rectangles might inspire you to wish you could change your ways—if only for a few minutes after the movie/show/song is over.

So in honor of Mockingjay — Part 1‘s rebelliously action-packed release this weekend, we’ve posed the following question to our staff this week: What’s the movie/TV show/song/book that makes you embrace your inner badass?

Ashley Fetters, EW.com news editor: I’ll never get over my first encounter with Lara Croft. I apologize in advance, purists: The iteration I loved was Angelina Jolie in Tomb Raider, not the video-game character. But either way, I think it was the first time I’d ever seen strength and swagger look so damn cool on a woman. Today there are, like, 20 different badass movie women I routinely pretend to be when I’m at the gym (Run Lola Run‘s Lola when I’m on the treadmill, Demi Moore in G.I. Jane when I’m successfully executing 500 one-arm push-ups, etc.), but whenever I need to summon the guts to handle something that terrifies me, the question is still, WWLCD? READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly: Is 'Mockingjay - Part 1' really a movie?

This is not a rant about anything. I need to clarify that up front, because 2014 has been a horrible year for ranting. But it’s also been great year for very good things that straddle the line between how we used to define television and how we used to define movies.

Is True Detective a miniseries or an 8-hour movie? Should The Knick rank in Steven Soderbergh’s filmography? Fargo and Hannibal transformed well-trod source material into a new kind of remake—half greatest hits compilation, half concept album. Not for nothing, 2014 was also the year that Shonda Rhimes claimed Thursday for old-fashioned weekly TV, with three flavors of throwback procedural (doctor show, politics show, lawyer show) infused with soap operatics.

On the big screen, Hollywood’s embrace of aggressive franchising came up with fascinating new mutant forms of sequel-prequel-reboots. It’s become common to compare the cinematic output of Marvel Studios to television production: Kevin Feige is the showrunner; different directors serve the Marvel vision first and their own vision second; cast members sign seven-picture contracts, the new incarnation of the old TV-actor Faustian bargain. (Steady work = no freedom.) You can feel the TV-ification of cinema in small ways and large. Wasn’t Dwayne Johnson’s Hercules just a more expensive version of Kevin Sorbo’s Hercules? (I mean that as a compliment; Hercules is one of the best watch-it-on-a-plane movies released this year.) Isn’t Horrible Bosses 2 just a renegade from the parallel universe where Jason Bateman, Jason Sudeikis, and Charlie Day starred in a middlingly popular bro-com on Fox? READ FULL STORY

How could 'The Hunger Games' continue after the movies? Just ask Harry Potter

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The release of MockingjayPart 1 this weekend signals the beginning of the end for The Hunger Games quadrilogy, based on Suzanne Collins’s books—though the franchise won’t stop when the film series does, at least if Lionsgate has anything to say about it. And thankfully for the studio, there’s already a precedent for this type of world-expansion—set mostly by one very important boy wizard.

Harry Potter is the gold standard for maintaining a fervid fan base after a film series (based on an incredibly popular book series) ends. The Hunger Games has already taken more than a few cues from its predecessor; after all, Mockingjay is only being split into two parts thanks to the precedent set by Harry‘s Deathly Hallows strategy. But Potter has also mastered the life-after-movie game. (It’s worth mentioning that Harry Potter owes something to Star Wars when it comes to milking franchise potential for all it’s worth—but unlike Potter or Games, that franchise wasn’t based on previously-established source material.)

How else can Katniss take a leaf out of Harry’s spellbook? This is how you keep a fanbase alive—Harry Potter style. READ FULL STORY

'Mockingjay': Why the worst 'Hunger Games' book should make the best film

Mockingjay is the most polarizing novel in the Hunger Games saga. Although most agree that it’s Suzanne Collins’ weakest book, some defend it; others claim it’s actually the series’ best. However, all three camps agree that, in Mockingjay, Suzanne Collins takes things to extremes, tackling traitors, murder, war, and one of the most haunting, realistic portrayals of violence in YA literature.

That being said, Mockingjay is also a study of post-traumatic stress. After two books of children both killing and being killed, Collins uses Mockingjay to finally give her characters time to be damaged. That divide—one half of the book focuses on extreme emotion, while the other half focuses on extreme action—keeps Mockingjay from flowing as smoothly as the rest of the series. But it’s also why Mockingjay—Part 1, if done correctly, should make for the best film in the Hunger Games franchise thus far. READ FULL STORY

Woody Harrelson hosts 'Saturday Night Live': Talk about it here!

Will the odds be in Woody Harrelson’s favor when he hosts Saturday Night Live tonight? Let’s examine the evidence.

Pro: He has hosted the show twice before (and did a cameo in host Kirstie Alley’s monologue back in ’91, along with the rest of the Cheers gang), so he understands what’s expected of him and should be fairly comfortable coming back to Studio 8H. Con: He hasn’t hosted since the Bush administration. The first Bush administration.

Harrelson’s last SNL stint began with a cold open about Johnny Carson leaving The Tonight Show; characters appearing on the episode included Adam Sandler’s Opera Man and a Rob Schneider invention called “Jeff, the Sensitive Naked Man.” Harrelson’s big sketch revolved around his boyish good looks and perfectly sculpted chest. Another ended with a Rodney King joke. In short: It was a different time.

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Jennifer Lawrence and Stephen Colbert plan to fight crime together

At this point, Jennifer Lawrence knows how to work a talk show. She sang Christmas carols with Letterman, for goodness’ sake. But her appearance on The Colbert Report was less about what she said (or sang) and more about just having some fun with Stephen Colbert.

During the interview, Lawrence and Colbert decide to become vigilantes; they plan out her future downward spiral, which won’t involve crystal meth because it’s bad for the skin; and they get to the origin of her “J-Law” nickname.

And she loves it.

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Beyond 'Gilmore Girls': 10 other exciting Netflix additions

Given the news that Gilmore Girls is coming to Netflix in October, you might be tempted to spend the entire month binging on that. We wouldn’t blame you, but there are some other exciting editions coming to the site this month if you want to take a break from Stars Hollow.  READ FULL STORY

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