PopWatch Entertainment Weekly's PopWatch Blog

Tag: Mike Nichols (1-3 of 3)

Philip Seymour Hoffman: Remembering the stage actor

Taking stock of an actor’s legacy on the stage is trickier than summing up a career on screen. After all, we can all go back and watch a film performance with the click of a mouse or by sliding in a DVD. Movies are endlessly available to us. The stage, on the other hand, is a living thing that varies from night to night. Some nights are magical, others less so. But when a show’s run ends, so does its life. It can be remembered, but not relived.

Maybe that’s why I feel incredibly lucky to be able to look back on a handful of Philip Seymour Hoffman’s most indelible stage performances and think that, for a brief moment, I shared something with him. Something ┬áthat lived and breathed and was over too soon. I know I’m not alone. I’m sure that anyone who sat in a hushed Broadway theater to see Hoffman play Willy Loman in Death of a Salesman, or James Tyrone in Long Day’s Journey Into Night, or either of the warring brothers in Sam Shepard’s True West feels that way too. That we were witnessing something special and magical at that moment — not just in the grim hindsight of his premature death Sunday at age 46. READ FULL STORY

This Week on Stage: James Bond on Broadway, 'Wicked' turns 10

Who says it’s not easy being green? Well, Kermit the Frog did actually, but if you’re literal high-flyer Elphaba in the musical Wicked, it’s pretty darn boss, especially give that the teen-adored Stephen Schwartz musical (which received mixed reviews upon opening in 2003) just celebrated 10 years on Broadway this week. (EW just featured leads Kristin Chenoweth and Idina Menzel on our annual Reunions cover). And unless Halloween rendered you deaf from overzealous trick-or-treaters, Broadway became all abuzz with the debuts of real-life, smoldering couple Daniel Craig and Rachel Weisz in a revival of Harold Pinter’s Betrayal, but if seeing James Bond tortured and anguished over love affairs wasn’t your thing, you had plenty of other downtown NYC options, like a new Wallace Shawn effort, a remounting of one of last year’s most acclaimed Brecht pieces, or That 70’s Show‘s Debra Jo Rupp taking on diminutive, football-helmet-topped Dr. Ruth Westheimer in a new one-woman show (click on the links below for full reviews): READ FULL STORY

Broadway's 'Death of a Salesman' topped $1 million at the box office last week

In a rare feat for a non-musical on Broadway, Mike Nichols’ acclaimed revival of Death of a Salesman grossed just over $1 million last week, according to figures released by the Broadway League. The hit show, starring Philip Seymour Hoffman as Willy Loman and Andrew Garfield as his wayward son, Biff, set a new record for the 1,036-seat Barrymore Theatre. What’s even more remarkable is that Salesman scored at the box office despite playing only seven performances (most Broadway shows are mounted eight times per week). The production isn’t exactly a dime a dozen, to quote one of Biff’s lines: It’s been boosted by an A-list cast, stellar reviews, multiple Tony nominations, and a strictly limited engagement that’s let producers charge a premium for tickets. Last week’s average ticket price was a whopping $140.68, which enabled the show to earn 107 percent of the theater’s potential gross. That’s good news for the show’s investors, who announced May 16 that they’d already recouped their $3.1 million commitment to the show.

READ FULL STORY

Latest Videos

Advertisement

From Our Partners

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP