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Tag: Michael Fassbender (1-9 of 9)

'X-Men' stars Hugh Jackman, Michael Fassbender, and James McAvoy dance to 'Blurred Lines,' read fan fiction -- VIDEO

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As Hugh Jackman, Michael Fassbender, and James McAvoy ramp up their interview schedule for the sure-to-be-blockbuster X-Men: Days of Future Past, it’s going to be hard to beat their recent appearance on The Graham Norton Show.

Norton got all three actors to fully let their guard down when talking about:

1. The only song that would get Fassbender out of his trailer, “Blurred Lines.” A (very sexy) dance party ensues:

READ FULL STORY

Oscar Too-Due List: Which never-nominated actors really deserve a nod?

Not every great actor wins an Academy Award. (Rest in peace, Peter O’Toole.*) In fact, simply getting nominated for an Oscar or two might be the truer measure of excellence. There have been plenty of actors with as many Oscar statues as Paul Newman — one! — but few can hold a candle to his nine nominations, which represent a lifetime of brilliance.

But before an actor can pile up multiple nominations like Newman or O’Toole or Al Pacino, he or she needs that first nod. Sounds simple enough. Last year, four actors heard their name called for the first time, and when this year’s nominations are read on Jan. 16, several more — like Chiwetel Ejiofor — are likely to join the club.

Once an actor gets that prefix attached to her name — “Oscar-nominee” — voters seem more inclined to bestow it again and again. But getting that first nomination sometimes seems as hard as earning that first $1 million. Inevitably, there will be some great actors and great performances that will get passed over this year — again. For some young actors, it might be a slight disappointment tempered by a bright future that hopefully will bring other opportunities. But for other, more seasoned actors, every near-miss is a thud to the mid-section that can echo like a chiming grandfather clock.

It’s these “unrecognized” actors that highlight our Oscar Too-Due List. Some of them are Oscar contenders this year; others might not be in the mix but have been regularly overlooked by the Academy. I don’t approve when Oscar unofficially hands out career-achievement awards in the form of a nomination, but here is a list of 20 actors who are overdue for some love: READ FULL STORY

Who are Hollywood's biggest stars... when they're stripped of their superpowers?

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In the current era of The Avengers and Batman Vs. Superman, it’s impossible to be a fan of the comic-book genre and not have a well-considered argument to the question, “Who’s the Most Powerful Superhero?” Superman, of course, is the most obvious answer in any superpower battle-royale debate, but there are strong and more interesting claims to be made for the others, too. (Except Hawkeye. Sorry, guy.)

In Hollywood offices, there are similar conversations going on all the time about their own legion of superheroes, those famous actors and actresses who can open a movie in New York, Nebraska, and Nepal, whether it be a romance, an action-adventure, or a raunchy comedy. But with more and more of the industry now tilted towards Comic-Con-approved tent-pole pictures, the pecking order for actors today is heavily weighted by his or her ability to land a major role in a superhero franchise. It is the lifeblood of a long and prosperous career. For example, playing Batman not only elevated Christian Bale to the Hollywood A-list — positioning the indie actor for other major studio movie roles — but his enhanced financial security allowed him to continue to gamble on the eclectic roles he preferred in the first place, in movies like The Fighter and Rescue Dawn.

When the right actor gets the right superhero role, it becomes virtually impossible to separate the artist from the character. The cape becomes part of their public persona, one that can help or hinder their other on-screen roles. But what happens when Hollywood’s heroes are stripped of their superpowers? That is to say, what is Robert Downey Jr. without Tony Stark’s armor? What is Hugh Jackman when his Wolverine claws are clipped? Do we still pay to see their movies, or do we give them the cold-shoulder, like old-school Lois Lane used to give old-school Clark Kent? Who is the most powerful superstar when they’re nothing more or less than their Hollywood alter ego?

After looking at the actors and actresses who are major players in current comic-book franchises, we examined their recent box-office and critical reputation when they’re not in costume, and then ranked them in order to see who really flies the highest and has the biggest muscles in the movie universe. READ FULL STORY

Brad Pitt would 'absolutely' show '12 Years a Slave' to his kids -- VIDEO

Though he appears for barely eight minutes in ’12 Years a Slave,’ the story of a born-free black man sold into slavery affected Brad Pitt so strongly that he calls the film his reason for acting and would even show the film, which has attracted attention for its harrowing scenes, to adopted son Maddox.

“It’s why I got into film in the first place,” said Pitt, who plays abolitionist Samuel Bass in the Steve McQueen-directed film, to NBC‘s Ann Curry.

“It’s one of those few films that cuts to the base of our humanity,” he continued. “And it was not ’til I saw Solomon Northup’s story that I fully, fully grasped the utter horror of losing your freedom, or denying another one their freedom, taking their freedom, splitting their family apart. It’s abhorrent.” READ FULL STORY

Lance Armstrong movie in the works. Who should play him?

Lance Armstrong may not ever be seen back at the Tour de France, but in movie theaters? That may be on the horizon.

Last week, Paramount Pictures and J.J. Abrams’ production company, Bad Robot, announced plans to adapt New York Times reporter Juliet Macur’s upcoming book Cycle of Lies: The Fall of Lance Armstrong, due out in June [EW’s request for comment from Paramount was not returned]. It’s no surprise Hollywood has made a move — the story is captivating, and full of the kind of highs and lows that filmgoers love. Which just leads to the inevitable question: Who will portray the disgraced cyclist?

Bradley Cooper told BBC News yesterday that he “would be interested in [playing Armstrong]. I think he’s fascinating. What a fascinating character.”  Cooper would be a great choice – post Silver Linings Playbook, it’s clear the professionally trained actor enjoys serious fare, and a prime part like Armstrong in a good adaptation could be great Oscar bait. Beyond Cooper, here are some other choices of men we’d love to see tackle the role. READ FULL STORY

The Bible is suddenly the hottest thing in Hollywood. What other scriptural tales could work as feature films?

Hollywood is — if nothing else — a land of over-stuffed bandwagons, and as studio suits begin to tire of super-sizing fairy tales, the latest micro-trend in “let’s-try-launching-this-kind-of-franchise” appears to be feature films based on the Bible.

The first, director Darren Aronofsky’s take on Noah, just recently wrapped filming in Iceland with Russell Crowe, Emma Watson, Jennifer Connelly, and Anthony Hopkins. The rest of the Bible-based projects remain in some stage of development without an official greenlight, but many have A-list names hovering around them. According to Deadline, there are two possible films about Moses, with Ridley Scott and Steven Spielberg respectively circling the directors’ chairs. Will Smith is reportedly eyeing the story of Cain & Abel as his directorial debut. Paul Verhoeven is developing a biopic about Jesus, based on Verhoeven’s own book and research, that strips away all the miracles of the New Testament. Most recently, screenwriter Vera Blasi (Woman on Top) penned a script about Pontius Pilate — i.e. the man who condemned Jesus Christ to the cross — that was just snapped up by Warner Bros.

But that is just scratching the surface when it comes to Bible stories that are ready-made for the big screen, especially in the Old Testament. In the interest of providing Hollywood with even more half-baked ideas, my colleague Darren Franich and I humbly suggest the following ecclesiastical tales as sure-fire potential box office blockbusters:  READ FULL STORY

This Week's Cover: A behind-the-scenes look at 'Prometheus,' Ridley Scott's return to sci-fi

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In this week’s cover story, Entertainment Weekly provides an exclusive sneak peek at this summer’s top-secret, 3-D space epic Prometheus —  director Ridley Scott’s eagerly-awaited return to science fiction after three long decades — and attempts to get to the bottom of the question that every fanboy wants to know: Is the new film a prequel to Scott’s 1979 face-hugging, chest-bursting classic, Alien?

Ever since Prometheus was announced in January 2011, the R-rated sci-fi odyssey has been shrouded in mystery. Little was known about the film except that (a) its cast includes Charlize Theron, Michael Fassbender, Idris Elba, Guy Pearce, and in the lead, the original Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, Swedish actress Noomi Rapace; (b) the script is by Jon Spaihts and and Lost‘s master of the mysterious Damon Lindelof; and (c) its story revolves around the crew of a spaceship called Prometheus that heads off to a distant planet whose inhabitants visited Earth long ago.

But an exclusive visit to the set of the film — two hours northeast of Reykjavik, Iceland — yielded more answers. There, EW watched a master director at work and sat down with the star-studded cast as they tap-danced around calling the R-rated film an Alien prequel. “There’s definitely a link to Alien,” says Fassbender, who plays the spaceship’s resident android. “There are creatures in it that you’ll recognize, but that’s only one tiny facet of what’s going on.”

Scott, who’s making his first sci-fi film since 1982’s equally visionary Blade Runner, is the toughest nut to crack. At first all he’ll say is, “There may be a vague notion, some slight DNA from the original Alien. But barely. Fans of the original Alien will notice some things, especially toward the end of Prometheus. Like 12 minutes from the end. But I can’t really say more than that.”

But eventually, Scott does say more than that.

To find out how much more, pick up the new issue of Entertainment Weekly, on stands Friday, May 11.

Entertainment Weekly is now available on most tablets, including the iPad, Nook Color, Kindle Fire, and Samsung Galaxy. Think of it like the EW you already love, but on steroids: With our digital magazine, you can buy the recommended movies, albums, books, and DVDs while you’re reading about them. Plus, you can watch music videos and film trailers, and find movie showtimes in your neighborhood. Current subscribers can access the digital version of EW for free by downloading the EW app (also free) and logging in using your name and address or the information on your subscription label. Single copies of the magazine are also for sale through the app if you prefer to read EW that way. If you’re not a subscriber, but would like to become one, you can do so by going to ew.com/allaccess.

Charlize Theron: Keeping the Fassbender Package Punchline Watch alive

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Did you think the end of awards season meant no more inappropriate jokes about Michael Fassbender’s Little Mickey? If so, you were wrong. Leave it to fellow 2012 Oscar snubee (and new mom) Charlize Theron to revive that most illustrious institution: The Michael Fassbender Package Punchline Watch.

At this weekend’s Human Rights Campaign gala, both Prometheus costars were in attendance. During her acceptance speech for the Ally for Equality Award, Theron told Fassbender (who presented the award to her), “Your penis was a revelation. I’m available to work with it any time.” We can only assume she was talking about his work in Shame and not just making a general statement. READ FULL STORY

My Leap Day proposal: Feb. 29 will end in an engagement... or gloves?

Amy Adams doesn’t have the market cornered on Leap Day proposals — or self-embarrassment, for that matter. In my quest to make the most of the extra time the calendar elves have given me this year (suck it, Tracy Jordan and your $50,000 gift certificate to Benihana!), I’m looking to that great source of lore and historical accuracy: Wikipedia.

According to the site’s Leap Day page, not only do I have the right to propose to a man today, but if he says no, he has to buy me a dress or a dozen pairs of gloves — or hand over cold, hard cash. As we know, nothing heals the pain of rejection like material goods! Either way, I have only to gain from prostrating myself on the Internet. Game on, gentlemen! Below, I run down my prospects. READ FULL STORY

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