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Tag: Matthew McConaughey (1-10 of 39)

Matthew McConaughey HAS to return for 'Magic Mike' sequel

The McConaissance was a wonderful thing for pop culture. It brought us Mud, and True Detective, and of course, culminated in Mr. Alright, Alright, Alright finally earning an Oscar for his work in Dallas Buyers Club.

But are fans of Matthew McConaughey about to experience a downside to the actor’s recent success? The Channing Tatum-penned Magic Mike sequel, Magic Mike XXL, just received a release date of July 3, 2015. If things Work Out As They Should, it should be a wonderful two hours of G-strings, ’80s songs, and showcases of Tatum-created dance moves (ideally with less Alex Pettyfer and more Zac Efron). But what if recent Oscar winner Matthew McConaughey decides he’s above returning for the sequel? (A rep for the actor didn’t respond to EW’s request for comment.) READ FULL STORY

Patton Oswalt spoofs 'True Detective' -- VIDEO

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Is Patton Oswalt throwing his name in the ring for True Detective season 2?

Unlikely — but his spot-on Matthew McConaughey impression will make some fans hope so. To promote his upcoming Comedy Central stand-up special Tragedy Plus Comedy Equals Time, Oswalt channels McConaughey’s iconic interrogation scene from the HBO show, perfecting his southern drawl and helpfully asking leading questions like, “Is the Yellow King my Xbox nickname?”

Maybe time is a flat circle, man. Watch the promo below:

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Watch celebs do their best Matthew McConaughey impersonation -- VIDEO

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Matthew McConaughey is known for many things: His voice, his catchphrases, his abs, and most recently, his McConaissance. But over the years, other celebs have taken the opportunity to impersonate the one-of-a-kind drawl that McConaughey takes with him everywhere he goes.

From Matt Damon to Kate Hudson, we’ve rounded up some of the best McConaughey impersonations. Watch our supercut below: READ FULL STORY

Matthew McConaughey on the origin of 'Alright, alright, alright' -- VIDEO

After Matthew McConaughey took home an Oscar for his work in Dallas Buyers Club, CBC’s George Stroumboulopoulos Tonight decided to post a 2011 interview with the actor. Why? Because it explains the catchphrase that McConaughey has uttered in just about every awards acceptance speech this season: “Alright, alright, alright.”

And now, the interview has caught people’s attention on Reddit. Not surprisingly, post-McConaissance Matthew seems to have a bigger following that the young kid who once made Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Next Generation.

In the interview, McConaughey discusses getting into character as David Wooderson in his first film, Dazed And Confused. And thanks to a little inspiration from Jim Morrison and a Doors live album, McConaughey uttered the three words that will forever be associated with the raspy-voiced Texan.

Fun fact: There are only three “alrights” because of a math malfunction in McConaughey’s nervous first-time actor brain. Celebs! They’re just like us!

Watch the interview below:

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Matthew McConaughey's 'Wolf of Wall Street' chest thump gets a remix -- VIDEO

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For a character quirk that was never written into the original script, Matthew McConaughey’s now-infamous chest thump in The Wolf of Wall Street has clearly struck a chord — especially with the folks over at Eclectic Method who have taken it upon themselves to remix the rhythmic beat into an uptempo tune.

McConaughey’s chest thumping, laced with a dance rhythm, serves as the back beat for the remixed track, which also cuts in other sounds heavily used throughout the Martin Scorsese film.

Watch Eclectic Method’s “The Wolf of Wall Street Chest Thump Mix” below: READ FULL STORY

'True Detective' post-mortem: Creator Nic Pizzolatto on happy endings, season 2, and the future of Cohle and Hart

True Detective wrapped its celebrated, intensely parsed first season last night with a finale that has invited a wide variety of reactions. Your opinion might hinge on whether or not you found the revelation of The Yellow King — Errol Childress, aka The Lawnmower Man — and his evil to be interesting and a surprisingly uplifting, optimistic ending for Rust Cohle (Matthew McConaughey) and Marty Hart (Woody Harrelson) to be the correct call for the series.  The man behind the madness stands behind his choices, although the writer (best known before this for the crime novel Galveston) sounds a bit relieved that the roller coaster ride of his first major work for television has reached its conclusion.  “Our long national nightmare is over!” laughs Nic Pizzolatto, jumping on the phone not long after the east coasting airing, and before watching the finale with his family and music supervisor T. Bone Burnett at McConaughey’s house. In this brief interview, Pizzolatto discusses his endgame vision, clarifies Errol’s master plan, and teases season 2 of True Detective — and the future of Cohle and Hart.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: So let’s talk about the twist ending: Rust Cohle and Marty Hart walk away from this alive. I was not expecting that. I also wasn’t expecting that we’d get to see them process the experience to the extent that they did. And then there was the strong note of optimism at the end. Why did you want to end this story this way?

NIC PIZZOLATTO: A few reasons. We’re never going to spend time with these guys again. And killing characters on television has become an easy short cut to cathartic emotion. So I thought killing the guys, or having something more mysterious happen to them  – like the guys charged into Errol’s underworld, and disappeared, and nobody knows what happens to them – would have been the same thing if the show had gone full-bore into the supernatural: To me, it would have been puerile, and it would have skirted all the issues the show raised. To me, the challenge was to not only let these guys live, but show true character change through this journey. That passing through the eye of the needle in the heart of darkness has actually done something to them.

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'True Detective' finale review: Truth, justice, and the satisfying surprise of a happy ending

Culminating a remarkable first season in fine, moving form, True Detective’s finale, titled “Form and Void,” took us to the heart of darkness at the vortex center of its weird fiction — as well as  the final stage of its meta-commentary on the stories we tell ourselves, about ourselves, for better and worse. It was a tale that ripped dark marks on our bellies, then soothed us by “making flowers” on us. So to speak.

We start on the outskirts of the infernal plane. We begin in hell on earth. The ersatz underworld of The Yellow King — a.k.a. Errol Childress, a perverse product of paternal abuse, generational evil, and his own deranged, pop-culture informed myth-making — was a theater of the mind for a fantasy made real: His vision of Carcosa, the necropolis of Ambrose Bierce and the fallen world of Robert W. Chambers, littered with dead trees and body bags. Childress lured Cohle into his ascension chamber — the staging area for so many murders, and last night, a stage for an ancient ritual, the oldest story of all. Light versus dark. Good versus evil. “Little priest” versus wannabe Elder God. It was The Real World: Dungeons and Dragons, and Cohle, hard boiled to the core, was ready to play. I’ll see your abyss and gaze right back, Lawnmower Man!

He was fooling himself. Rust Cohle has always been fooling himself. His cynicism, his callousness were parts of the mask he wore to engage the world, to deal with himself. But it offered no protection when his mind — tweaking from the fetid evil around him — conspired against him and waylaid him with a vision of a coal-black vortex spiraling down to claim him. Maybe you were thinking: They’re going to do it! Cthulhu is coming! Coming to take us away, ha-ha! Ho-ho! Hee-hee! Beam me up, Lovecraft!

But no. It was gotcha moment, for Rust, and for us. READ FULL STORY

'True Detective': The most insightful fan tributes

If you’ve watched one episode of True Detective, HBO’s gritty meditation on good vs. evil, you’ve likely consumed them all — rabidly, and multiple times. Not since Lost has a television series so deeply tapped into our obsessive conspiracy theorist sides. And not since fans asked “What is the Island?” has the Internet been pondering one singular TV question: Who is the Yellow King? 

At its core, True Detective is a story about two detectives, Rustin Cohle (Matthew McConaughey) and Martin Hart (Woody Harrelson), partners who are haunted by a grisly occult murder that took place in Louisiana in 1995. (Spoilers ahead, so read on with caution.) The series time-jumps through 17 years of Rust and Marty’s tense relationship, from a horrific showdown with the (supposed) murderers in 1995, to the pair’s major falling-out in 2002, to a 2012 reconciliation of sorts prompted by the “debt” that weighs on both of their souls — the revelation that the killer is still out there.

The creepy clues revealed throughout the episodes so far have viewers obsessing over every little, beautifully crafted detail. Why was the body of Dora Lange, Rust and Cohle’s 1995 murder victim, found bound in a praying position under a tree, wearing only a crown made of deer antlers? The detectives keep coming across devil’s nests and painted spirals, whispers of Carcosa and the Yellow King. Rust is convinced the disappearances of women and children along the Louisiana Gulf for years have been tied to Lange’s ritualistic murder. Is the Tuttle family, powerful both politically and in the religious institutions of the Katrina-ravaged bayou, behind it all? In last week’s penultimate episode we met the oft-mentioned “tall man with scars,” who may also be the Spaghetti Monster — and the real killer. Or is he just a pawn?

True Detective creator Nic Pizzolatto recently debunked the idea that either Rust or Marty were behind the murders, but plenty of other theories abound. Some fans have laid out their theses and True Detective tributes in painstaking detail for other obsessives to pore over; below are some of the most intriguing. Tune in to HBO on Sunday at 9 p.m. ET for the season finale, and to find out which ones were closest to the mark. READ FULL STORY

We love you, now change: What other actors are due for a McConaissance?

Matthew McConaughey’s journey from rom-com stud muffin to Oscar-winning actor is officially complete. Six years ago, he starred in Fool’s Gold and Surfer, Dude. At Sunday night’s Oscars, he took home the Best Actor prize for his performance in Dallas Buyers Club, the culmination of a string of career-rehabilitating roles that included Magic Mike and Mud. McConaughey was always a popular star, and his frivolous, formulaic romantic comedies likely served as golden handcuffs for several years of his career that left him in a creative rut. Give him credit for recognizing that and then actually doing something about it. “I did consciously say, ‘You know what, I’m going to not work here for awhile and think about what I want to do,’” McConaughey said at Sundance in 2013. “I just said I feel like I’ve done a version of [rom-com and action roles] before. Or I feel like I can do that tomorrow morning. And I think I’ve done enough of that for now, and I want something that I don’t think I can do tomorrow morning. I want something that scares me.”

For almost two years, just as he and his wife were starting their family, McConaughey let the phone keep ringing, and when he’d finally figured things out, he answered it to find an eclectic collection of filmmakers — William Friedkin, Richard Linklater, Lee Daniels, Jeff Nichols — at the other end of the line. “Isn’t that wonderful the way the world works!” McConaughey said. “This is what I’m talking about. [These roles] scare me! Oooo!”

With McConaughey’s transformation as the template, what other Hollywood stars need to step out of their comfort zone? Who needs to take a step back, let the phone ring, and re-energize their creative juices? Click below to see our choices for their own personal McConaissance: READ FULL STORY

Watch the moment Matthew McConaughey proved he was Oscar-worthy -- VIDEO

Sure, the 86th Academy Awards featured some of Hollywood’s biggest stars. Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie were there. Meryl Streep was there. Leonardo DiCaprio was there. But if I’m being honest, part of me saw this “get together” as less of a show and more of a reunion. More specifically, A Time to Kill reunion.

In the crowd sat several cast members of the 1996 film, which included Sandra Bullock, Kevin Spacey, Samuel L. Jackson, and of course, first-time Oscar winner Matthew McConaughey. And the second I saw this photo of Jackson and McConaughey, I couldn’t help but think back to the film that, for me at least, first indicated that this McConaughey guy was something special.

In the film, Jackson played Carl Lee, whose daughter had been raped by two white men. When it appeared the men were going to get away with their crime, Carl Lee killed them. It was then Jake’s (McConaughey) job, as Carl Lee’s lawyer, to convince a jury in the South that his black client shouldn’t go to jail. And he did it with an unforgettable closing argument. In that one speech, McConaughey’s performance pulled me in and made me realize the power with which he could command a scene.

Watch McConaughey light the match that started his (long) road to the Oscars below:

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