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Tag: Marvel (1-10 of 90)

Why Kirby v. Marvel mattered

In 2014, it’s quite common to know almost every detail behind the production of a superhero movie before the movie is even released. From the release date to the cast to the director to screenwriters, every detail is examined and disseminated across myriad blogs and social media sites, to the point where, if you’re even mildly interested, you could easily find out the names of those responsible for getting that film to your local cinema.

But how about the people who created the characters in the pages of comic books?

In the early days of comic books, the relationship between creators and publishers was often exploitative. Many of the people responsible for creating the heroes that would make publishers millions were freelancers, working from home, never making a regular salary outside of their normal page rates and often struggling to get back their original artwork, collect royalties, or even get the level of credit due to them. People create pop culture, not corporations.

Of all those people, few have gotten the short shrift like Jacob Kurtzberg, better known as Jack Kirby.

READ FULL STORY

'Disney Infinity 2.0': Anything your heart, or imagination, desires

Disney Infinity 2.0 made me feel eight years old. And I mean that in the best way possible.

There’s a certain magic to playing with toys when you’re young. Action figures spring to life in your imagination, and pieces of furniture transform into the sites of epic battles. A hallway can become a racetrack, a chair a mountaintop, and all it takes is a couple plastic figures to create a spark of inspiration.

Infinity 2.0 lets players create whatever they can imagine, and the spark this time around is bringing together the Mouse House’s vast catalogue of franchises and some of the most famous superheroes in the world, Marvel’s Avengers. By creating a cohesive art style and setting players loose in the game’s Toy Box mode, Infinity 2.0 is a brilliant package for kids looking for a creative outlook—and it can satisfy an older crowd, too.

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We texted Groot some of our burning pop-culture questions

You can now text Groot, and, as you could probably guess, the Guardians of the Galaxy tree does not have a very wide vocabulary. Still, we at EW decided to see if Groot could weigh in on some of our burning pop-culture questions.

Just how are we texting Groot? Well, anyone can reach him at (866) 740-4531. As TechCrunch reported, credit goes to developer Ricky Robinett, who created the chatbot. Groot is apparently quite popular: As Robinett tweeted this morning: “Groot had a busy night last night, he has now sent over 60,000 messages!”

But what does Groot have to say about Taylor Swift’s new album? Can he confirm who is playing Doctor Strange? Here’s our (somewhat one-sided) conversation. READ FULL STORY

Loki fans, rejoice: Here's an entire movie about him

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Few comic book characters have received a bigger boost from a movie adaptation than Loki, Son of Odin. Before 2011’s Thor, Loki was generally rendered as a malicious grinning creep, a “trickster” bad guy with less substance than a season-3 Adam West Batman villain.

There were occasional exceptions–but nothing that ever matched the geekosphere-spanning depth charge of Tom Hiddleston’s scene-stealing performance. Hiddleston gave Loki an air of dreamy-tragic cool–he’s Asgard’s rebel without a cause–and then Avengers gave Hiddleston a greatest-hits selection of villainous one-liners. The character was practically the co-lead in Thor: The Dark World–and in a franchise that’s shockingly low on even halfway decent villains, he’s arguably just as important for the ongoing health of the onscreen Marvelverse as any of the non-Downey superheroes. READ FULL STORY

Robert Downey Jr. says 'Guardians' is the best Marvel movie

According to Tony Stark, Tony Stark needs to step up his game.

In an interview with the Toronto Sun, actor Robert Downey, Jr.—Iron Man himself—told the paper that Guardians of the Galaxy, “in some ways, is the best Marvel movie ever.” Surprised? Given the similarities between his portrayal of Tony Stark and his actual public persona, he doesn’t blame you. “It’s odd for someone with—on occasion—an ego the size of mine to actually say that,” said Downey. READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly: 3 stories show why Daredevil is the best superhero

Entertainment Geekly is a weekly column that examines pop culture through a geek lens and simultaneously examines contemporary geek culture through a pop lens. So many lenses! Sometimes we’ll look back at an essential part of the last few decades of geek history. Today: Three very different, equally fantastic takes on Daredevil.

Blind man, blind lawyer, blind superhero. Lives on the baddest best side of the best bad city. Hates bad people; fights them in court and fights them on the street. Wears red. Has a best friend: tubby, lovable, concerned. Has a girlfriend; probably has another. Has a secret identity; it’s never too secret, unfortunately. Drives himself too hard, definitely. Crazy, maybe. Raised in his city, loves his city, watches his city take everything away from him, over and over again. That’s Daredevil. That’s the formula. That’s how you get three of the greatest superhero stories ever told. READ FULL STORY

Vin Diesel hints that he's going to be in another Marvel movie

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Vin Diesel officially joined the Marvel family in Guardians of the Galaxy. And you don’t turn your back on family…even if they already cast you as a talking tree in one of their multifarious film franchises. So Diesel posted a message on his Facebook page, which strongly hinted that he might have a key role in another strand of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. “Vin and Marvel… you all made it happen!” writes Diesel, before dropping the big bombshell. “I get the strange feeling that Marvel thinks I’m Inhuman… Haha.” READ FULL STORY

So does it matter that 'Guardians of the Galaxy' is just 'The Avengers'?

Listen, fun is fun. Even fun that feels an awful lot like other fun—even fun that was specifically designed by a fleet of fun engineers to remind you at the microscopic level of fun you had two years and three months ago.

Thus: Guardians of the Galaxy, a movie that is undeniably fun, is also undeniably The Avengers. And Thor, and Iron Man, and Captain America: For all the chatter over the last couple years that Guardians would mark a wild departure from the Marvel Studios superhero safe zone, James Gunn’s space (rock) opera looks an awful lot like the nine other Marvel films, if you scrape away the mixtape-soundtrack and all the pastel-skinned aliens.

Consider: READ FULL STORY

Stan Lee cancels Comic-Con plans

Stan Lee won’t be making it to Comic-Con this year.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, the otherwise healthy Lee is canceling his appearances after losing his voice due to a case of laryngitis.

Lee created many of Marvel’s most recognizable characters—including Spider-Man and the Fantastic Four—with help from legendary artists like Steve Ditko and the late Jack Kirby. Over the years, his name has become synonymous with the comics industry.

As such, he’s become a staple both on the convention circuit and in superhero flicks—go see a movie with a Marvel character in it and odds are there’s a Stan Lee cameo. At 92 years old, Lee is mostly retired from Marvel and writing comics, but still regularly engages with fans both online and on the road.

Lee’s illness is not expected to interfere with any of his other scheduled appearances.

'Hawkeye' #19 to tackle deafness with sign language, empty word bubbles

There are a lot of reasons to be reading Hawkeye, Matt Fraction and David Aja’s comic about what life is like for the Avenger who isn’t imbued with any godlike powers or power armor. The adventures of Clint Barton and Kate Bishop, the Hawkeyes of two different Coasts, are regularly among the best in superhero comics, and the most inventive.

Like next week’s long-awaited Hawkeye #19, which will feature dialogue almost entirely in sign language.

Taking place after a battle that leaves Clint Barton with severe ear damage, the story will explore how he deals with a sudden loss of hearing. It’s the sort of thing that’s happened to Hawkeye before, but never quite like this: Word bubbles will be blank, the sign language used will not be interpreted, and body language will be more important than ever.

“If nothing else, it’s an opportunity for hearing people to get a taste of what it might be like to be deaf,” writer Matt Fraction said in an interview with The New York Times.

Hawkeye #19 marks the second time Fraction and Aja make a bold departure from convention. Last summer’s 11th issue, “Pizza Is My Business,” told a dialogue-free story entirely from the perspective of Hawkeye’s pizza-loving dog Lucky as the perplexed dog solves a murder. It may very well be crowned with an Eisner Award for best single-issue story of the year at Comic-Con tomorrow.

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