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Tag: Leonardo DiCaprio (1-10 of 29)

The greatest Best Actor race? Where does this year's class rank in Oscar history?

This year’s Best Actor race is shaping up to be one of the greatest of all time. And by greatest, I mean both the most competitive and also the most outstanding, in the sense that each nominee is excellent — hypothetical winners in almost any other year. They also reflect the depth of superb male performances in 2013. Consider: Tom Hanks (Captain Phillips), Robert Redford (All Is Lost), Joaquin Phoneix (Her), Oscar Isaac (Inside Llewyn Davis), and Michael B. Jordan (Fruitvale Station) all missed the cut.

EW’s Owen Gleiberman recently analyzed this year’s Best Actor race, calling it the most “fiercely, thrillingly white-hot competitive” race in memory. Matthew McConaughey is the presumed front-runner for his transformative performance as an HIV patient in Dallas Buyers Club. He’s won most of the pre-Oscar prizes, and the media is still enamored with the McConaissance that has him tackling challenging projects after more than a decade of playing shirtless dudes. Chiwetel Ejiofor breaks your heart as Solomon Northup in the epic 12 Years a Slave, an unforgettable movie experience that depends almost entirely on his graceful performance. Leonardo DiCaprio — who’s never won an Oscar despite being Hollywood’s most famous face for 15 years — is making a strong late push for his performance as a crooked financier on The Wolf of Wall Street. Bruce Dern would become the oldest Best Actor winner if he takes home the prize for his stoic role in Nebraska as an aging man who sets out to collect his dubious sweepstakes winnings. And Christian Bale, an Oscar winner who is likely on the short list of greatest working actors in their prime, is the so-called long-shot for his amazing performance as a 1970s scam artist who gets in over his head with crooked pols and the FBI. It truly is a murderer’s row: three glamorous Hollywood leading man in the prime of their careers, one old-timer conjuring up screen magic to remind audiences of his greatness, and one completely mesmerizing performance from an English actor who finally received the leading role that was equal to his obvious talents.

So is this the greatest “class” of Best Actor nominees in history? And if not, where does it rank? Today, on Sirius radio, EW’s Darren Franich, Lanford Beard, and I nominated the best Best Actor races in Oscar history. Darren selected 1968, the year Rod Steiger took home the trophy for In the Heat of the Night, edging Warren Beatty (Bonnie & Clyde), Dustin Hoffman (The Graduate), Paul Newman (Cool Hand Luke), and Spencer Tracy (Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner). Lanford chose 2006, the year Philip Seymour Hoffman won for Capote, with Terrence Howard (Hustle & Flow), Heath Ledger (Brokeback Mountain), Joaquin Phoenix (Walk the Line), and David Strathairn (Good Night, and Good Luck) in the mix.

Click below for one guy’s top 10 all-time Best Actor races, with the main criteria being iconic performances and legendary actors. Feel free to disagree in the comments. READ FULL STORY

Leonardo DiCaprio on 'Titanic': 'I'm incredibly proud of it'

Remember that time when Leonardo DiCaprio starred in that one movie about that one boat? Titanic, it might have been called? Just kidding. We know it’s Titanic because we’ve watched it a million times, and DiCaprio appreciates that. READ FULL STORY

'Wolf of Wall Street' QuickDraw: Fewer clothes, still vulgar

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Anyone who’s seen The Wolf of Wall Street knows it really earned that ‘R’ rating. So what would the film look like if the naked ladies were stick figures and the bad words were bleeped? Still pretty dirty, actually.

Check out EW’s QuickDraw of the Oscar nominee below, and note how Leonardo DiCaprio’s voice can make anything sexy — even a doodle. (Warning: NSFW) READ FULL STORY

'Saturday Night Live' best host poll: Will Jonah Hill's heart go on? -- VOTE

Martin Scorsese’s one and only muse, Jonah Hill, hosted Saturday Night Live for the third time over the weekend, and not only did he bring along his Wolf of Wall Street sidekick, Leonardo DiCaprio — an SNL virgin — but he also reunited with his Superbad pal Michael Cera. Hill, who may have forgotten to mention that he’s now a two-time Oscar nominee (for Wolf and Moneyball), also resurrected his Catskills-comic-inspired 6-year-old Adam Grossman and… and…

Okay, let’s cut to the chase. The show was solid. Some real funny bits. But Jonah and Leo doing their Titanic relaxation exercise was the show-stopper, a moment that crowned Hill as king of the comedy world — at least for a moment. If Hill had dropped the mic right then, I think he’d already done enough to advance in our Saturday Night Live best host poll.

But if Hill is here to stay, who’s on the outside looking in? It’s certainly not Drake, who debuted in first place with a solid 54 percent. And it’s certainly not Jimmy Fallon, who slipped to second but can be counted on to hang around with 24 percent. Josh Hutcherson refuses to go quietly, scoring double-digits again, and Kerry Washington edged Paul Rudd to survive another elimination.

A quick rundown on our simple objective: To identify the best, funniest, most memorable SNL host, the most memorable guest who fit in with the cast and put on a performance that you, your mom, and your co-worker were all chuckling about on Sunday afternoon. It's subjective, of course, but let's reward the guest hosts who brought something special to the table. My own personal bottom line: Do you want to see this host back on the show next season?

So far, Bruce Willis, Miley Cyrus, Edward Norton, Lady Gaga, Tina Fey (Blerg), John Goodman, and Rudd have been eliminated.

Below, I’ve embedded one representative clip for each of the five hosts currently in the race. After the poll closes, the host with the least support will be eliminated, and the surviving four will face off against Melissa McCarthy on Feb. 1.

Watch the clips, refresh your memories, and vote. READ FULL STORY

SNL: Here are two GIFs of Leo and Jonah's 'Titanic' hug

Admit it, your favorite part of Saturday’s SNL was Leonardo DiCaprio’s surprise cameo during Jonah Hill’s monologue. Below, find two GIFs of Leo and Jonah reenacting a famous scene from Titanic. READ FULL STORY

'Saturday Night Live' recap: Jonah Hill gets a boost from Leonardo DiCaprio

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If you happened to tune in to SNL after Jonah Hill’s monologue, you probably thought it was an uneven mix of sketches with a laugh here and there. If you viewed the show in its entirety like I did, your ride started off with a BANG and slowly lost steam as the episode went along, but not without hitting a few other highs (and lows) along the way. Hill was returning for his third time in the host’s seat (or the Benihana seat), a strong addition to his Actor’s Stat Card, which also now reads, “two-time Academy Award nominee.” The host could hardly mention as much in his monologue before the anticipation started to build: It really seems like they’re building up to a Leo cameo right now. But there’s no way he’ll stop by, right? Are they…? Is he…? And then, there he was in all of his bronzed boyish charm, Leonardo DiCaprio. I gasped. READ FULL STORY

Best from backstage at the Golden Globes: Leo on Marty, Bono on Mandela, plus Jennifer Lawrence, more

The best way to interview a celebrity? After they’ve won an award. Backstage at the Golden Globes, the parade of celebs — including A-listers like Jennifer Lawrence, Leonardo DiCaprio, and even U2 — were more than happy to greet the press and answer any and all questions.

Read on for some of our favorite quotes from the free-for-all press room:

Leonardo DiCaprio (winner — Best Actor, Drama for The Wolf of Wall Street) on Martin Scorsese and getting obsessed with his Wolf role:
I’m just thankful that Marty Scorsese is still as punk-rock, still as vital at 71 years old.

I stopped this film and it was like a giant adrenaline dump. I haven’t been able to work since, really. It was a phenomenal experience. Making movies is an interesting process. You put your entire life on hold. And these characters really do envelop you, for better or for worse. So, thank God none of the attributes of this character rubbed off on my real life, because I probably wouldn’t be standing here today.

Bono (winner, with U2 for Best Song “Ordinary Love” from Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom), on understanding Mandela: 
There’s a few firsts, but the most powerful was to be with the great man on Robbin Island and hearing his voice crack as he spoke about his experience spending so much time on Robbin Island. And few so stoic and so kind of dismissive of his own pain. The first moment in our entire relationship that I saw him just lose it was on Robbin Island, and I’m not sure if you know this, but Mr. Mandela from cutting rocks on Robbin Island of salt had lost the use of his tear ducts. So this great man through all this historical triumph, was unable to cry. And in 2004 he had an operation to fix his tear ducts. It just so struck us on that occasion. It was very emotional on Robbin Island. And to be on the island with for Edge and myself is something we’ll never forget.
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'The Wolf of Wall Street': Greed is awesome. No, wait...awful!

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Money is a drug in The Wolf of Wall Street — the most powerful intoxicant “of all the drugs under God’s blue heaven,” the movie’s ­depraved protagonist, Jordan Belfort, blusters in the opening scene. There’s a lot of substance abuse in Martin ­Scorsese’s polarizing new movie — pills by the fistful, cocaine by the shovel, and women by the hour (they’re mostly treated as substances, and mostly abused). But it’s cash, pumped in via telephone, ticker, and wire transfer, that tops them all. In one of the film’s most entertaining scenes, Belfort, played with witty belligerence by Leonardo DiCaprio, tosses his favorite fix at a pair of federal agents, who walk away. He’s flummoxed: Why aren’t they junkies too?

The Wolf of Wall Street’s detractors have faulted the filmmakers for failing to maintain a critical distance from their repellent characters. In turn, some of its champions have belittled those critics as prigs who want a movie’s moral boundaries drawn in bold black lines and its judgments made reassuringly clear. The dispute has been noisy and nasty (turns out that cocaine really does make people angry!). My own take: The blazing and funny Wolf doesn’t lack moral per­spective, but it’s awfully self-serving about where it places its indignation. Treating money as a drug turns Belfort’s story from one of crime and (lack of) punishment into an allegory of ­addiction — of excess leading to downfall, recovery, and, possibly, relapse. It’s an unsustainable metaphor that, just as the system did, lets him off too easily.
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Leonardo DiCaprio casually tells Ellen about the time he almost got attacked by a shark -- VIDEO

For most people, having a close encounter with a great white shark would probably be a terrifying experience. For Leonardo DiCaprio, it seemed like just another day at work.

The Wolf of Wall Street star sat down with Ellen DeGeneres on her talk show and told the story about when DiCaprio got stuck in a cage with a shark while filming Blood Diamond back in 2006. The conversation started by talking about the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation which the actor started in 1998 to protect endangered species and their eco systems, including sharks. DiCaprio has traveled to numerous places with the organization, including Nepal looking for endangered tigers, but it was during one scuba session with sharks that things got a little choppy.

“They actually said, ‘In 30 years, this has never happened.’ The tuna kind of got stuck on the top of the cage, and the great white leapt out and tried to bite it and went into the cage with me. Half of its body was in and out and I’m flatted down at the bottom. It was this far away and it chomped a few times, but I survived it.”

Watch DiCaprio tell the story below:
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George Clooney takes shots at Leonardo DiCaprio and Russell Crowe

George Clooney is confident. Confident enough to live in Clark Gable’s old house and look like he truly belongs there. Confident enough to open an interview with a colorful anecdote he’s told before — to the very same magazine that’s currently featuring him on its cover. (To be fair, it’s a great anecdote; Clooney says he won a new dog’s heart by rubbing himself with turkey. In 2011, it was a turkey meatball; two years later, he’s calling it turkey bacon.)

And he’s also confident enough to call B.S. on Leonardo DiCaprio, based largely on the other star’s basketball prowess — or lack thereof. “The thing about playing [basketball against] Leo is you have all these guys talking sh–,” Clooney says in the latest edition of Esquire. Clooney, by contrast, knows “that you don’t talk sh– unless you can play.” And in the end, he continues, Leo and his trash-talking teammates were no match for Clooney and his quieter pals: “’We’re all like 50 years old, and we beat them three straight: 11–0, 11–0, 11–0.”

It’s a cute, pretty harmless story until Clooney gets to the kicker — “The discrepancy between their game and how they talked about their game made me think of how important it is to have someone in your life to tell you what’s what. I’m not sure if Leo has someone like that.”

READ FULL STORY

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