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Tag: Kevin Costner (1-4 of 4)

Durham Bulls celebrate 25th anniversary of 'Bull Durham' in awesome(ly bad) ways

To honor Bull Durham, the 1988 film that made both their team and comical minor league baseball ballpark promotions famous, the Durham Bulls are hosting movie-themed activities throughout their 2013 home schedule. Cue the “Bull Durham Racers,” people wearing mascot-size costumes of Nuke, Crash, and Annie, who run across the warning track and then mingle with the crowd for photo ops. Check out a video below.

Trivia contests are also planned, along with videos of current and past players reciting famous lines from the Kevin Costner-Susan Sarandon film. Other tributes include the “Nuke Dog” at concession stands, various giveaway items, and Bull Durham-era throwback jerseys worn by the team at all Saturday home games (which will be auctioned off for charity at season’s end). If you’re a diehard Bull Durham fan with some vacation time, you may want to head to North Carolina on Sunday, June 16, when the players will also wear those throwback jerseys for a “game-long tribute to the film coinciding with the exact weekend it was released a quarter century ago.” Hope you enjoy that, visiting team (Indianapolis Indians)! And you know that bull mascot is goin’ down. READ FULL STORY

Nine things you didn't know about 'Bull Durham' -- the greatest sports comedy ever made

Like The Shawshank Redemption and Tommy Boy, Bull Durham is one of those movies that always seems to be on TV. It doesn’t matter whether it’s two in the afternoon or two in the morning, somewhere in the outer reaches of cable, Kevin Costner, Tim Robbins, and Susan Sarandon can be found bickering about baseball and who’s taking whom to bed. In my opinion, it’s probably the best sports comedy ever made, right up there with Caddyshack, and the original Bad News Bears. Still, as many hours as I’ve spent in the company of Crash Davis, Nuke LaLoosh, and Annie Savoy, I was surprised how much I didn’t know about the film until I spoke with the cast and crew for an oral history about the making of Bull Durham, which can be found at our Sports Illustrated sister site.

As a taste of what you’ll get, here are nine things you probably didn’t know about Ron Shelton’s 1988 baseball classic.

READ FULL STORY

Your party is a wonderland: 'Vanity Fair' Paramount portrait is an A-list playground

Image credit: Art Streiber, exclusively for Vanity Fair

Well, I just lost my afternoon. In honor of Paramount’s 100th anniversary, Vanity Fair has “assembled 116 of the greatest talents ever to work at the studio.” That means Leo, Bob, and Marty, some icons of the studio’s golden age (hello, Eva Marie Saint, Jerry Lewis, and Michael York!), almost the entire casts of Transformers and Star Trek, and even that Canadian whippersnapper Justin Bieber, whom you might remember from a little indie film called Never Say Never. And that’s just the tip of the iceberg (Titanic zing, hey-yo!).

Because Vanity Fair knows you want to see every one of those 116 faces up close and personal, they’ve installed a zoom function on their site. Fair warning, PopWatchers: This thing is addictive. Click through at your own risk. Below, we scope out a few of the famous faces and hand out our portrait honors. READ FULL STORY

'Hatfields & McCoys': 5 things to expect from History's miniseries

Tonight, the miniseries Hatfields & McCoys, starring Kevin Costner and Bill Paxton as the patriarchs at the center of the great American family feud, premieres on History (9 p.m. ET). Here’s what awaits you:

1. A bullet-riddled history lesson. Most people have heard of “the Hatfields and the McCoys,” but if you don’t know their story, this three-night event will fix that. The basics: The Hatfields are from West Virginia and the McCoys are from Kentucky, separated by the Tug Fork River. At least according to the miniseries, Devil Anse Hatfield (Costner) and Randall McCoy (Paxton) fought side-by-side in the Confederate army until Anse believed the Civil War was lost and deserted. While Randall went through further hell, Devil Anse’s timber business flourished. In January 1865, Randall’s brother Asa Harmon McCoy, who’d fought for the Union army, was killed — by Devil Anse’s uncle Jim Vance (Tom Berenger). In 1878, the families went to court over the ownership of a pig and a relative of both families whose testimony swayed the jury in favor of the Hatfields was killed by two McCoys. In 1880, Devil Anse’s son Johnson “Johnse” Hatfield (Matt Barr) began courting Randall’s daughter Roseanna McCoy (Lindsay Pulsipher) and eventually got her pregnant. Needless to say, by the time Devil Anse’s brother Ellison Hatfield (Damian O’Hare) was killed by three of Roseanna’s brothers in 1882, the feud was officially on. Devil Anse retaliated by having the McCoy boys tied to pawpaw trees for a firing squad execution. (The location is one of the stops on the official Hatfield-McCoy Feud Driving Tour.) And that, by the way, only takes you to the midpoint of the miniseries. READ FULL STORY

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