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Tag: Jim Carrey (1-9 of 9)

Shia LaBeouf -- who is 'NOT FAMOUS ANYMORE' -- fires back at Jim Carrey, quickly recants

The tags on this post are not entirely accurate; Shia LaBeouf and Jim Carrey aren’t exactly in a celebrity feud. Why? Because in order to be in a celebrity feud, one must be a celebrity. And Shia wants you to know that he is no longer one of those:

Reeaally embracing that retirement “from all public life,” Shia.

Anyway, here’s the LaBeef: While presenting the award for Best Motion Picture — Comedy or Musical at the Golden Globes last night, Jim Carrey decided to have a little fun at the Transformers star’s expense. He began his patter by quoting an old chestnut that may have originated with actor Edmund Gwenn: “Dying is easy. Comedy is hard.” Then came the kicker: “I believe it was Shia LaBeouf who said that. So young, so wise.”

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There Should Be a Sequel: 'The Truman Show'

Every week, EW will imagine a sequel to a movie that we wish would happen — no matter how unlikely the idea really is.

Fifteen years ago, The Truman Show felt like science fiction. In 1998, the conceit — that a man who, unbeknownst to him, has been living in a giant Hollywood set so that his entire existence could provide easy entertainment for the masses — read like a paranoid fantasy. Bold and imaginative, with just the right balance of the far-fetched and the familiar, it felt like it would’ve been a good fit for The Twilight Zone. Today, it’d be a good fit for Discovery Channel: the idea that millions of Americans would raptly devour a nonstop broadcast of an unexceptional person’s daily life is a given in this post-Snookie age.

Which is why I demand there be a sequel. The universe brought to life by director Peter Weir and writer Andrew Niccol satirized reality TV and social media before most people had even thought of such word combinations. The Truman Show can even claim its very own mental disorder. Imagine where the story could take us now. Besides, Jim Carrey’s already revisiting another of his ’90s masterpieces — why not add this one to the mix?

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Check out 10 now-famous comedians in their early days of stand-up

Patton Oswalt posted a clip on Twitter of his first acting gig at the tender age of 19. The seasoned actor-comedian may not totally appreciate the look back at his performing roots — a faux stand-up routine that doubles as an educational video on college loans — but fans and viewers are sure to be amused by not just the look back at the then-baby-faced Oswalt but also the totally outrageous early 90s fashion. Every comedian started somewhere — often on a dark stage in awesomely dated clothes.

Watch his set below and check out the stand-up routines (and the fashions!) from some of your favorite comedians. (Some  videos may be NSFW due to explicit language.) READ FULL STORY

Who said it: A 'Dumb & Dumber' guy -- or a woman on 'The Newsroom'?

It is a truth universally acknowledged that Will McAvoy is the smartest, noblest, most principled man in news — nay, the world.

Unfortunately, some people will never see Will that way because he happens to be played by Jeff Daniels — a.k.a. Dumb & Dumber‘s idiotic Harry Dunne, a touchstone for a generation of slack-jawed yokels. (Also because Daniels looks exactly like Dave “Joey Gladstone” Coulier, but that’s neither here nor there.)

Then again, it makes a weird sort of sense that The Newsroom — which returns to TV this Sunday — shares a close connection with a Farrelly brothers classic. Despite their impeccable pedigrees (two Peabody Awards! Two PhDs! A B.A. from whatever clown college Maggie went to!), the ladies of Aaron Sorkin’s latest creation could easily be described as dumb (Sloan), dumber (MacKenzie), and dumbest (Maggie).

To wit: They don’t know how email works. They brag about reading Don Quixote “in the original French.” They think LOL means “lots of love.” They can’t add and subtract without counting on their fingers. They don’t get the difference between Ado Annie and Annie Oakley, a mortal sin in Sorkinland. When you sarcastically note that you’re glad “nobody’s invented a way to digitally store images and upload them onto a free website where anyone can see them,” they earnestly reply, “Has someone invented a way to digitally store images?”

And if you mix a bunch of their quotes with quotes from Dumb & Dumber, it’s actually tough to figure out where each line originated. Don’t believe me? See for yourself:
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Jim Carrey apologizes for insulting assault rifle enthusiasts

Jim Carrey has been picking a fight lately with people who support the sale of automatic weapons, calling them “maniacs” in the wake of the Aurora, Colorado, shooting last July and making harsh allegations about their relationships with their mothers in March. The star has also announced his refusal to publicize his role in the gun-happy Kick-Ass 2.

However, perhaps inspired by a spirit of national companionship, Carrey has apologized for insulting the owners of high-powered automatic death machines. On Sunday, he tweeted:
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MTV Movie Awards: 10 all-time greatest moments -- VIDEO

Tonight, MTV will broadcast its 21st annual Movie Awards. Truth: Twenty years ago, the golden popcorn for Best Movie went to A Few Good Men (following that: Menace II Society, Pulp Fiction, and Se7en). Safe to say, the show’s tone has changed pretty dramatically from those edgy early days when Dennis Miller hosted and Denzel Washington won Best Male Performance for Malcolm X. (I personally trace the trajectory shift back to the short-lived decision to create a Best Sandwich in a Movie category in 1996.) Yet even as the show’s gotten more mainstream (read: Twilight- and Hunger Games-saturated), it’s never failed to churn out cultural flashpoints that have ranged from steamy to awkward, subversive to surreal, and everything in between. Below, we run down the 10 most memorable moments.

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Jim Carrey's passionate gun control op-ed trades fart talk for earnestness

Here’s that sequel to Ace Ventura: Unlikely Gun Control Advocate we’ve all been waiting for!

Jim Carrey made waves last Monday with a Funny or Die video called “Cold Dead Hand,” which spoofed the pro-gun advocacy of the NRA and the late Charlton Heston. After Fox News’s talking heads spent the rest of the week raking the Golden Globe winner and his liberal ideas over the coals, Carrey shot back with a statement that called the network “a last resort for kinda-sorta-almost-journalists,” “a media colostomy bag that has begun to burst at the seams,” and perhaps most damningly of all, “a giant culture fart.” (And this from a guy who knows his farts.)

But in a new Huffington Post op-ed, Carrey trades name-calling for passionate arguments about why he feels gun control is so essential. “I disagree wholeheartedly with those who say that there are just too many guns out there to control and that more gun laws won’t make a difference,” he writes. “Change must start someplace.” He makes a point to note that he isn’t in favor of eliminating the right to bear arms, “though it is in the vested interests of those who profit by gun sales to make it seem so.” READ FULL STORY

Jim Carrey responds to Fox News: They 'will be remembered as nothing more than a giant culture fart'

We can guess who Bill O’Reilly will dub Pinhead of the Week.

Jim Carrey has released a statement against Fox News (he refers to it in his official statement as “Fux News”) after the network spent the past week attacking his Funny or Die video. In Carrey’s song, “Cold Dead Hand,” which already has racked up over 1.8 million views, the comedian takes on gun enthusiasts with lyrics such as, “The angels wouldn’t take him up to heaven like he planned, cause they couldn’t pry that gun from his cold dead hand.”

Along with the video, Carrey expressed his views about the musical project on Twitter, writing, in part, “Gun folks are afraid that control won’t stop with large magazines. Their nervousness is far less important than the safety of our children. ‘Cold Dead Hand’ is abt u heartless motherf%ckers unwilling 2 bend 4 the safety of our kids.”

Read Carrey’s full statement, where he refers to ‘Fux News’ as “a last resort for kinda-sorta-almost-journalists whose options have been severely limited by their extreme and intolerant views; a media colostomy bag that has begun to burst at the seams and should be emptied before it becomes a public health issue,” below: READ FULL STORY

Jim Carrey takes aim at gun enthusiasts in 'Cold Dead Hand' -- VIDEO

Jim Carrey’s new Funny or Die video ”Cold Dead Hand” could be described as biting social commentary, incendiary liberal nonsense, dumb and dumber, funny, bizarre, or any mixture of the above. The master impressionist pulls double-duty, playing the late Charlton Heston on the set of Hee-Haw and then fronting Lonesome Early and the Clutterbusters (with the band Eels) for a country song spoofing gun enthusiasts.

It’s all pretty provocative, with lyrics like: ”The angels wouldn’t take him up to heaven like he planned, cause they couldn’t pry that gun from his cold dead hand” and ”Only the devil’s true devotees could profiteer from pain and fear.”

In a press release Carrey said, ”I find the gun problem frustrating and ‘Cold Dead Hand’ is my fun little way of expressing that frustration.”

Carrey also took to Twitter yesterday saying, ”Gun folks are afraid that control won’t stop with large magazines. Their nervousness is far less important than the safety of our children,” ”’Cold Dead Hand’ is abt u heartless motherf%ckers unwilling 2 bend 4 the safety of our kids,”’ and much more.

Watch it here and let us know what you think. (It’s a little NFSW): READ FULL STORY

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