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Tag: In Memoriam (31-40 of 310)

'Glee' stars 'leaning on each other' on set following Cory Monteith's death

The stars of Glee got back to work last week following a month of mourning their late castmate Cory Monteith, who died July 13 from a combination of heroin and alcohol. For Harry Shum Jr., who plays Mike Chang on the show, being surrounded by people who love Monteith is just what the cast needed.

“We’ve all been leaning on each other. It’s been a rough patch and a rough time,” he told People magazine on Saturday. “I don’t know when that will ever end, that rough patch of losing a friend like that. It’s so unexpected, but we’re all leaning on each other.”

Before returning to work, the cast and crew gathered July 25 to pay tribute to the actor, who made his name playing Finn Hudson on Glee. Jane Lynch (Sue Sylvester) said that memorial was a necessary part of their grieving process.
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Singer Eydie Gorme dies at 84

Iconic nightclub singer and vocalist Eydie Gorme, best known for her Grammy-nominated 1963 hit, “Blame it on the Bossa Nova,” died Saturday in Las Vegas following a brief illness. She was 84.

Gorme and her husband, Steve Lawrence, met in 1953 when Gorme joined the cast of a local New York TV show hosted by Steve Allen. The duo, who married in 1957, became one of the most enduring vocal teams in pop music history. Lawrence, their son David, and others close to the family were with her at the time of her death, according to Foxnews.com.

In a statement, Lawrence said: “Eydie has been my partner on stage and in life for more than 55 years. I fell in love with her the moment I saw her and even more the first time I heard her sing. While my personal loss is unimaginable, the world has lost one of the greatest pop vocalists of all time.”

In addition to Lawrence and their son, Gorme is survived by a granddaughter. Her other son, Michael, died of heart failure in 1986.

Watch a video of Gorme in action below:
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Chris Colfer remembers Cory Monteith: 'Love and miss you, buddy'

Cory Monteith’s Glee family gathered last week for a memorial on the Paramount Studios lot where the show films, but the tributes didn’t stop there.

Following the private event, Chris Colfer (Kurt) took to Instagram — just as co-star Jenna Ushkowitz (Tina) had done days earlier — to remember his co-worker and friend.
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Twister (board game, not 'nado): A pop culture timeline

Charles Foley, inventor of the board game Twister, died yesterday at 82. May he rest in peace in whichever socially awkward color-coded contortion was his favorite.

I always thought Twister was the greatest board game ever invented — in theory, anyway. In execution, I think I was playing it wrong. I have distinct memories of ending up with my face smushed onto my uncle’s stomach and my other little cousins’ bare toes (THEY were doing it wrong) wriggling under my butt as I tried not to fall. I almost always surrendered out of embarrassment. What I really needed to do was grow up, work out, and play with sexy peers so my strategy could become less “Avoid the body hair of relatives” and more “Whoops! I fell down and touched your whole body.” I can still do it! Twister is timeless and shall never be forgotten.

Below, a brief timeline of the button-candy board game in pop culture:
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Broadway marquees to dim to honor James Gandolfini

Broadway theaters will dim their marquee lights Wednesday night in memory of James Gandolfini, the Sopranos star who earned a Tony Award nomination in 2009.

The Broadway League said Tuesday the lights will be dimmed for one minute at exactly 8 p.m. ET.

The 51-year-old actor died Wednesday in Rome and a funeral will be held Thursday at the Cathedral Church of Saint John the Divine in New York City.

Gandolfini received a Tony nomination for his role in the award-winning “God of Carnage.” He also appeared on Broadway in “On the Waterfront” in 1995 and “A Streetcar Named Desire” in 1992.
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Remembering James Gandolfini -- VIDEO

There’s a silver lining when great performers die. Even though, at 51, the world was undoubtedly robbed of James Gandolfini too soon, he is preserved in a very real way in the movies and television shows that endeared us to him.

We’ve written a lot about Gandolfini over the past 20 hours and will continue to do so to remember and honor his life and talents. But, when it comes down to it, Gandolfini can do that himself, too. So, EW created a little video tribute, chronicling some of Gandolfini’s best performances over the years.
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James Gandolfini's best 'Sopranos' lines: The Tao of Tony

While James Gandolfini died Wednesday at the far-too-young age of 51, the actor left behind a body of work that belies his only half-century of life. And nothing stands out in that career quite like Gandolfini’s near-decade embodying Tony Soprano on HBO’s The Sopranos.

David Chase’s groundbreaking series about the complicated mob boss was powerful for many reasons, none more so than Gandolfini’s delivery of Chase’s dynamic dialogue. During six seasons and 86 episodes, Gandolfini’s Soprano unspooled a life philosophy through impatient (but ultimately loving) interactions with his family, gruff instructions to his underlings and reluctant therapy sessions with Dr. Melfi.

Here is Life According to Tony Soprano, in his 16 best quotes:
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Tilda Swinton leads dance-along tribute to Roger Ebert

While it wasn’t officially a memorial event, the 15th Annual Ebertfest in Champaign, Ill., turned into a five-day-long celebration of the life of late, great film critic Roger Ebert. Perhaps most joyous of the many tributes, Oscar-winner Tilda Swinton stopped by to bring a 1,500-person auditorium to its feet for a dance-along to Barry White’s 1974 hit “You’re the First, the Last, My Everything.”

Introduced by Ebert’s widow, Chaz, and calling the dance a “spiritual service,” Swinton ran down into the audience and led a conga line through the aisles.

Check out the celebration below.

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Jonathan Winters' Mad Mad Mad Mad World: His life in comedy -- VIDEO

Bill Cosby was once asked whom he would choose if he had $50 in his pocket to buy a ticket to see only one stand-up comedian, live, in their prime. The comic legend barely took a breath before answering, “Jonathan Winters will make every last one of us stand there in awe.”

Winters, who died yesterday at the age of 87, was a master of voices, mimicry, and right-field spontaneity. “What I do is verbal paintings,” he told National Public Radio in 2011. “I paint a picture. Hopefully you’ll see the characters and what they’re doing and what they’re saying.”

For decades after he became famous for his comedy albums, he was a coveted late-night guest because no one — not the audience, not hosts like Jack Paar and Johnny Carson, likely not Winters himself — knew what he was going to do. An evening with Winters on the sofa was can’t-miss television, and a generation of comics that followed him — like Robin Williams and Jim Carrey — marveled and were inspired by his daring, try-anything antics.

Winters often joked about the mental hospital, playing slightly disturbed characters who belonged to or claimed to have escaped from the asylum. He was drawing from personal experience. At the height of his early fame, he had committed himself to a mental hospital and went on to live with what he diagnosed as bipolar disorder. “I need that pain — whatever it is — to call upon it from time to time, no matter how bad it was,” he told NPR.

So there was a bit of the tortured genius to him, but his comedy was rarely dark. It was manic and sly. Cosby compared Winters’ talent to jazz master John Coltrane, a improvisational artist who could inflate whole stories and characters off a single verbal cue. He was unstoppable, unpredictable, and inimitable. Take a look at some of his best work. READ FULL STORY

Annette Funicello's most memorable musical moments -- VIDEO

Annette Funicello, the ’50s and ’60s teen dream who passed away Monday after a long battle with multiple sclerosis, rose to fame as a “Mouseketeer” on the original Mickey Mouse Club and starred with fellow idol Frankie Avalon in a series of iconic big-screen “Beach Party” hits, including Beach Blanket Bingo and Bikini Beach. Along the way she made quite an impression on the music scene, singing and dancing her way into the hearts of millions with songs like “Tall Paul,” “Pineapple Princess,” “Because You’re You,” and “Beach Blanket Bingo.”

People put together a loving tribute to Funicello’s career in music, “Her Life in Song,” which showcases her most memorable moments from the Mickey Mouse Club, her films with Avalon and much more. Check it out below. READ FULL STORY

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