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Tag: In Memoriam (21-30 of 327)

Philip Seymour Hoffman remembered in video tribute -- VIDEO

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A little over a month ago, we lost Philip Seymour Hoffman. Eulogies have included essays, written remembrances of his best work, and — because it is 2014 — tweets. But the latest honoring of the late actor is perhaps the most telling of Hoffman’s impact on the world: Filmmaker Caleb Slain put together a 20-minute supercut of Hoffman’s best roles, including clips from The Master, Doubt, Boogie Nights, and Almost Famous, that shows his amazing range as an actor.

On the Vimeo page for the video, Slain writes that “200 hours of work went into breaking down 47 of Hoffman’s roles.” What resulted is a touching tribute that reminds us of Hoffman’s talents and how much the film world — including audiences — will be missing now that he’s gone.

Watch the tribute below: READ FULL STORY

Cory Monteith missing from on-air Oscars 'In Memoriam' tribute

The 2014 Oscars “In Memoriam” tribute honored all of those we lost this year in the world of film, followed by Bette Midler performing “Wind Beneath My Wings.” However, as viewers might have recognized, there was one name missing from the list: Cory Monteith.

Cory Monteith, who died in July, was best known for his television work as Finn Hudson on Fox’s Glee, but he wasn’t a stranger to the big screen either. Monteith starred in 2011’s Monte Carlo, Glee: The 3D Concert Movie, and more.

However, Monteith did make the Oscars In Memoriam gallery on their site.

Harold Ramis: Watch the comedy legend's best moments -- VIDEO

While comedy legend Harold Ramis died Monday at age 69, he leaves behind an astonishingly successful (and hilarious) body of work that will be enjoyed for years to come. Below, watch some of his biggest moments as an actor, writer, and director:

Harold Ramis remembered: Celebrities react to comedy legend's death

Harold Ramis died on Monday morning, causing fans of the star and his many comedies — including Groundhog Day and Caddyshack — to grieve on social media. Read below for statements and tweets from his famous fans, ranging from Parks and Recreation actress Rashida Jones to Family Guy mastermind Seth MacFarlane, and check back as we’ll continue to update this page throughout the day. READ FULL STORY

Celebrities pay tribute to Shirley Temple

Early-rising stars — including Whoopi Goldberg, James Franco, and Olivia Munn — have already begun to pay tribute to the late Shirley Temple Black, who died Monday at the age of 85. Expect more tributes to pour in as the day goes on; in the meantime, here’s who’s remembering America’s sweetheart so far:

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Russell Brand on Philip Seymour Hoffman: Our culture 'does not know how to treat its addicts'

Reformed substance abuser Russell Brand — who’s been clean and sober for over a decade — has spent years crusading on behalf of addicts. In 2011, when his friend Amy Winehouse died of accidental alcohol poisoning, he wrote a long tribute to her, taking pains to specify that addiction is a disease: “We need to review the way society treats addicts,” he wrote, “not as criminals but as sick people in need of care.” The following year, he testified before his home country’s Parliament to advocate decriminalizing drug addiction, saying again that those suffering from the disease should be treated with compassion.

And now Brand has weighed in on the recent passing of Oscar winner Philip Seymour Hoffman, who died of an apparent heroin overdose early last Sunday.

The comedian begins his Guardian column in an unusual way: by declaring that the demise of, say, a wild young star like Miley Cyrus or Justin Bieber would not be particularly shocking. The death of Hoffman, however — “a middle-aged man, a credible and decorated actor, the industrious and unglamorous artisan of Broadway and serious cinema” — strikes us as particularly tragic. In Brand’s eyes, however, it shouldn’t; “the man was a drug addict and his death inevitable.”

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This Week's Cover: The life and legacy of Philip Seymour Hoffman

The sudden death by apparent overdose of actor Philip Seymour Hoffman stunned Hollywood and left his family, friends, and colleagues shattered. In this week’s cover story, EW pays tribute to Hoffman, widely considered the greatest screen and stage actor of his generation.

Film critic Owen Gleiberman traces the arc of the Oscar-winning actor’s tragically curtailed career, exploring his ability, in role after role, to plumb his own depths to bring often deeply flawed characters to vivid life and to “lay bare the things that make people tick” — an emotionally wrenching process that clearly took a personal toll on the actor. We look back at Hoffman’s 10 most essential film performances — including his acclaimed work in movies like Capote, Doubt, and Boogie Nights, as well as lesser-known gems from throughout his career — and look ahead to the various projects he was working on at the time of his death, including the final installments in the Hunger Games franchise.

Director Brett Ratner, a fellow NYU film school student of Hoffman’s who later worked with the actor on the film Red Dragon, contributes a personal remembrance, while other friends and fellow actors and filmmakers offer their own tributes to Hoffman as both an artist and a man. “He was the warmest, most generous person and just overflowing with love and affection for his friends and family,” says actor Todd Louiso, a longtime friend of Hoffman’s who directed him in the 2002 film Love Liza. “I know the past two years have been really rough for him. To find out [about his death] doesn’t really compute to me. It just shows how strong that disease [of addiction] is.”

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Ian McKellen pays tribute to Philip Seymour Hoffman

Sir Ian McKellen is the latest celebrity to take to social media to remember Philip Seymour Hoffman, who was found dead in his New York apartment on Feb. 2.

McKellen updated his Facebook page with a post remembering Hoffman’s work as Konstantin in The Seagull, a production McKellen attended at New York’s Central Park in 2001. “He was without doubt one of the most accomplished screen actors of our time,” he writes.

More recently, Hoffman saw McKellen perform at the Cort Theatre. Sadly, however, the pair never met. Read McKellen’s tribute below:

Philip Seymour Hoffman: 12 scenes that make us miss him most

Philip Seymour Hofman passed away at the age of 46 on Sunday. Throughout his Oscar-winning career, the actor gave many memorable performances — from the mysterious and calculating Lancaster Dodd in The Master, to the hot-tempered Gust in Charlie Wilson’s War, to Lester Bangs, the iconic rock journalist in Almost Famous.

Check out some of our favorite scenes below, and tell us yours in the comments. READ FULL STORY

Philip Seymour Hoffman remembered: Celebrities react to star's death

Philip Seymour Hoffman’s death Sunday was shocking to his fans and to those who knew him and worked with him. Celebrities from Steve Martin to his Hunger Games: Catching Fire co-star Sam Claflin took to Twitter and other social media to share their memories of the late actor.

We’ll continue to update this post.
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