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Tag: I'm Just a Geek (11-20 of 738)

The 'Game of Thrones' TV Book Club: Let's talk about that Jaime/Cersei scene

Welcome back to the Game of Thrones TV Book Club, a discussion space for Thrones viewers who have also read the five books (so far) of George R. R. Martin’s Song of Ice and Fire series. This week, Darren Franich and Hillary Busis talk disturbing sex scenes, the value of adaptive changes, and just why Davos deserves better than his TV treatment. (You know there’ll be spoilers for the books and the show, right?) For more Thrones fun, check out James Hibberd’s full recap of “Breaker of Chains” and his interview with newly returned Thrones star Aidan Gillen.

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The 'Game of Thrones' TV Book Club: 'Song of Ice and Fire' readers talk Purple Wedding and more

Thought we were done with Game of Thrones articles for a few days, given yesterday’s barrage? Think again! Today EW introduces the Game of Thrones TV Book Club — a discussion space for Thrones viewers who have also read the five books (so far) of George R. R. Martin’s Song of Ice and Fire series.

This week, Darren Franich and Hillary Busis talk 77-course meals, the truth about Jon Snow’s parentage – and what Game of Thrones might do better than ASOIAF. (You know there’ll be spoilers for the books and the show, right?)

DARREN: It’s been about eight years since I first read Storm of Swords, and in rereading the chapters about the Purple Wedding, it struck me that there was one incredibly important aspect that the TV show left out: The 77 courses! Mushroom and snail soup, peacocks stuffed with dates, fish tarts fresh from the ovens: Eat your heart out, Top Chef! Was there anything that you missed from the Literary Purple Wedding, Hillary? Or, conversely, was there any new addition that particularly jumped out at you?

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'Game of Thrones': The 9 most satisfying deaths

The Red God of Death is no stranger to Westeros. Or Essos, for that matter.

When we talk about the Game of Thrones characters who have shuffled off (or, more accurately, been shoved off) this mortal coil, we tend to focus on the show’s most shocking demises – which often strike GoT‘s most noble, likable characters. (Think of the Red Wedding, or Ned’s brutal decapitation, or even the end of Qhorin Halfhand, which admittedly has more oomph in A Clash of Kings than it did on the show.) But those gut-punching sequences are only one piece of the puzzle. As anyone who’s watched “The Lion and the Rose” can attest, Thrones also excels in meting out justice to despicable folks in spectacular ways.

So on the occasion of The Big Thing That Happened Sunday, let’s take a look back at the Thrones deaths most likely to have viewers pumping their fists — instead of clutching their faces in sorrow. READ FULL STORY

'Batman: Strange Days': Watch Bruce Timm's 75th Anniversary cartoon -- VIDEO

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Batman turns 75 in May. Parent company Warner Bros. plans to celebrate this anniversary by continuing to produce ridiculously successful Batman movies, TV shows, videogames, comic books, and pogs, or whatever kids today play with.

But also, they’ve just released a new short animated film created by the great Bruce Timm — the animation guru who was a key architect in the family of DC animated shows, including all-time-great Batman: The Animated Series and the maybe-better-if-you-don’t-mind-the-future Batman Beyond. The short is called Batman: Strange Days, and features Hugo Strange (get it?) and a lot of fog. Watch it below: READ FULL STORY

'Good Wife,' 'Grey's Anatomy' exits: Dear TV, it's not you, it's them

It feels like every day brings news of another major character leaving one of our beloved shows. The recent influx started with Sandra Oh announcing that after 10 seasons, she was ready to say goodbye to Grey’s Anatomy. From there, we’ve had Paul Guilfoyle leaving CSI, Dan Bucatinsky leaving Scandal, Daniel Sharman leaving Teen Wolf, Claire Holt leaving The Originals, Josh Charles leaving The Good Wife, and really recently, even more Grey’s exits, to name a few.

But if television is at its best right now, with actors like Kevin Spacey and Matthew McConaughey joining the ranks of the small screen, then what is up with all the farewells? Was it something TV said?

I highly doubt it, but there’s a little something I’d like to say to TV. READ FULL STORY

IDW to release Harlan Ellison's 'Star Trek' tale as new graphic novel

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Everything in Hollywood has a story, but to pop culture nerds, perhaps no story is more interesting than the one surrounding the controversy behind acclaimed writer Harlan Ellison and his popular Star Trek tale, “The City on the Edge of Forever.”

Ellison wrote the original teleplay for the penultimate episode of the first season in early 1966, which he notes, “was changed vastly when the episode aired” on April 6, 1967. “The City on the Edge of Forever” focuses on the USS Enterprise discovering a portal through space and time, which ultimately leads to an accidental altering of history that Kirk and Spock, trapped in the 1930s, must race against time to correct. At its core, however, the episode is a genuine and moving love story between Captain Kirk and social worker Edith Keeler (Joan Collins).
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J.J. Abrams made you a mystery box

Anyone who watched Lost knows that creator J.J. Abrams is into mystery. And now he’s using his love of mystery for charity — kind of.

In 2007, Abrams gave a TED talk in which he spoke about a box his grandfather gave him. Abrams never cracked open the lid. Why? On principle: “The thing is that it represents infinite possibility,” Abrams explained. “It represents hope. It represents potential. And what I love about this box, and what I realize I sort of do in whatever it is that I do, is I find myself drawn to infinite possibility, that sense of potential. And I realize that mystery is the catalyst for imagination.” Ahh, so that’s why he’s so into creating mysteries that we never find out the answers to.

Bitterness aside, Abrams’ entire TED talk is worth watching for anyone interested in why his work is the way it is. And it serves as a fitting setup to his latest project: the Mystery Box.

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Want to know all the stuff 'The Lego Movie' is riffing on? Here's a reference guide

Before The Lego Movie could hit theaters last Friday, some assembly was required.

Correction: A lot of assembly.

Phil Lord and Chris Miller’s incredibly entertaining “block”buster is a hyperkinetic Frankenfilm, cobbled together from a variety of sources both huge (the classic “hero’s journey” monomyth) and teeny (does a certain dolphin noise sound familiar?). The movie is also filled with casting in-jokes, snippets of dialogue borrowed from other movies, and callbacks to the directors’ past work. All in all, it’s enough to make your head spin, Lego minifigure-style — there’s no way for one person to catch all these references in a single viewing.

That, happily, is where we come in. Check below for a guide to some of the film’s most notable references, compiled both from the movie itself and a close reading of its actual script. And since the film’s jam-packed enough that there’s no way to note everything Lord and Miller are riffing on, feel free to add missing pieces in the comments. Caution: It’s spoiler city down there. READ FULL STORY

Ken Burns launches new iPad app

History class just got a little more interactive.

Ken Burns — the documentary filmmaker known for his style of using archival footage — partnered with digital agency Big Spaceship to create an app that curates his films into hour-long “mixtapes,” according to Wired.

The app, “Ken Burns,” allows users to surf a timeline year by year, seeing how clips from each film line up chronologically with each other. “Zoom in on 1869, for example, and a cloud of clips from The Civil War, The West, and The National Parks orbit in parallax formation around one another; swipe to 1930, and it’s clips from Jazz, Prohibition, Baseball, Huey Long, Thomas Hart Benton and The Dust Bowl. You can also watch its six playlists straight through – they range in length from 20 minutes to an hour long – or select individual clips à la carte,” according to Wired.

Released today, the app is free to download from the app store. The full, premium version of the app is $9.99. Check out an intro video/demonstration below: READ FULL STORY

Regrets over Ron/Hermione pairing?! An open letter to J.K. Rowling

Dear J.K. Rowling,

Hello. I wish we were speaking under better circumstances, like I was congratulating you on the completion of the long-rumored Marauders prequel, but instead, I’m quite upset with you at the moment.  Your comments over the weekend that you might do things differently when it came to the romantic pairings of the golden trio in Harry Potter ignited a firestorm of fandom wars that had been mostly put to rest over the past few years, as readers went from arguing over who Hermione should wind up with and started caring more about whether Peeta and Katniss were a good match.

You said Ron and Hermione were only together in the books because of “wish fulfillment” on your part, and that it had “very little to do with literature and far more to do with me clinging to the plot as I first imagined it.” And you spoke about how you wish you could do things differently. Um, what? You’re dropping this info in 2014? What am I supposed to do with this information NOW? I can’t just ignore it! (Also, I probably owe some Harry/Hermione shippers an apology for calling them delusional from about 2003-2007.) READ FULL STORY

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